Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: Kathleen G. Haynes x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Kathleen G. Haynes

Although potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber yellow flesh per se is known to be controlled by a single gene, the intensity of yellow flesh varies widely in Solanum L. species. Many diploid species have very intense yellow flesh, as compared to the commercial tetraploid yellow-flesh cultivar `Yukon Gold'. Inheritance of yellow-flesh intensity at the diploid level was investigated in a hybrid population of S. phureja ssp. phureja (Juz. & Buk.)-S. stenotomum ssp. stenotomum (Juz. & Buk.) (PHU-STN). Six randomly chosen male parents were crossed to five randomly chosen female parents in a Design II mating scheme. In 1993, ≈12 progeny (clones) from each of the 30 families were planted in a randomized complete block design with two replications in Presque Isle, Maine, and evaluated for tuber yellow-flesh intensity as measured by a reflectance colorimeter. Twenty-five tubers from each plot were scored using the YI E-313 yellow intensity scale. An average YI E-313 score was obtained for each plot. Narrow-sense heritability on a plot mean basis was estimated as 0.99 with a SE of 0.65 to 0.72. There were significant differences among clones within a family. Results suggest that rapid progress can be made in breeding for intense yellow flesh in this diploid population. Clones from this population that produce 2n gametes represent an important source of germplasm for enhancing the intensity of the yellow-flesh trait in tetraploid potatoes.

Free access

John R. Stommel and Kathleen G. Haynes

Fruit of the cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) store predominantly glucose and fructose whereas fruit of the wild species L. hirsutum Humb. & Bonpl. characteristically accumulate sucrose. Reducing sugar and sucrose concentrations were measured in mature fruit of parental, F1, F2, and backcross (BC1) populations derived from an initial cross of L. esculentum `Floradade' × L. hirsutum PI 390514. Generational means analysis demonstrated that additive effects were equal to dominance effects for percentage of reducing sugar. It was determined that a single major gene, dominant for a high percentage of reducing sugar, regulates the percentage of reducing sugar in tomatoes. We propose that this gene be designated sucr. Only additive effects were demonstrated to be important for glucose: fructose ratios. Using L. hirsutum as a donor parent for increasing total soluble solids concentration in the cultivated tomato is discussed.

Free access

John R. Stommel and Kathleen G. Haynes

Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum coccodes, is a serious ripe tomato fruit rot disease. Genetic resistance to anthracnose is not available in commercial tomato cultivars, but has been reported in small-fruited Plant Introductions (P.I.), and with lesser intensity in a number of breeding lines. Transfer of high levels of resistance from these breeding lines or P.I.s to elite materials has proven difficult. Inheritance of resistance has been described as complex with at least six loci influencing resistance reactions. Segregating populations originating from a cross between a susceptible tomato breeding line and a large-fruited breeding line (88B147) with resistance derived from Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme P.I. 272636, were evaluated for anthracnose resistance. Analysis of anthracnose resistance in puncture-inoculated fruit indicated small, but significant, additive genetic effects for resistance. Additional populations were developed from crosses of a susceptible inbred processing tomato cultivar with: 1) the resistant P.I. 272636, 2) an unadapted small-fruited resistant line developed from P.I. 272636, and 3) the large-fruited breeding line 88B147, also with resistance derived from P.I. 272636. Small additive effects identified in large-fruited material, in comparison to the resistant P.I., suggests that resistance loci have been lost during germplasm development. This is consistent with the relatively larger lesions observed in large-fruited lines derived from P.I. 272636. Positive correlations were noted between small fruit size and high levels of anthracnose resistance. Identification of molecular markers linked to resistance genes in the respective populations will be discussed.

Free access

John R. Stommel and Kathleen G. Haynes

Inheritance of resistance to tomato anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum coccodes (Wallr.) S.J. Hughes was evaluated in parental, F1, F2, and backcross populations developed from crosses between adapted resistant (88B147) and susceptible (90L24) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) breeding lines. Resistance was evaluated via measurement of lesion diameters in fruit collected from field-grown plants and puncture inoculated in a shaded greenhouse. Backcross and F2 populations exhibited continuous distributions suggesting multigenic control of anthracnose resistance. Anthracnose resistance was partially dominant to susceptibility. Using generation means analysis, gene action in these populations was best explained by an additive-dominance model with additive × additive epistatic effects. A broad-sense heritability (H) of 0.42 and narrow-sense heritability (h2) of 0.004 was estimated for resistance to C. coccodes. One gene or linkage group was estimated to control segregation for anthracnose resistance in the cross of 90L24 × 88B147.

Full access

Kathleen G. Haynes, Lincoln Zotarelli, Christian T. Christensen, and Stephanie Walker

Consumer demand for specialty market potatoes has been growing. Cultivated South American diploid potatoes possess great variation for skin and flesh colors, shape, and taste. A long-day adapted population of Solanum tuberosum groups Phureja and Stenotomum (phu-stn) was evaluated for characteristics associated with the type known as papa criolla or papa amarilla in South America. Tubers have intense yellow flesh and may be fried or roasted and eaten whole. A U.S. northern location (Maine), representative of a seed growing region, and two southern locations (Florida and New Mexico), representative of potato growing regions near large Hispanic populations, evaluated yellow-fleshed clones selected within a phu-stn population. Agreement between selectors at two locations was greater than 50%. Tuber skin color and shape were highly correlated between locations; flesh color and tuber dormancy moderately so; eye depth had low correlation between locations; and appearance and skin texture had low or no correlation between locations. Tuber dormancy was generally short, but a few longer dormant clones were identified. There were significant differences among clones for yields, with the highest yields occurring in Maine. More intense evaluations are planned for a subset of these clones before possible release as new varieties. Future breeding efforts will be undertaken to lengthen tuber dormancy in this population.

Free access

John R. Stommel, Robert W. Goth, and Kathleen G. Haynes

Bacterial soft rot of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), caused by Erwinia spp., is a destructive postharvest market disease of this crop. Control is presently limited to chemical treatments. Methods of inoculating pepper fruit were evaluated to develop a reliable technique for soft rot resistance screening. Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) was isolated from partially decayed field grown pepper fruit at Beltsville, MD. Fruit were inoculated with suspensions of Eca via: (a) abrasion with Carborundum, (b) hypodermic puncture, or (c) non-wounded tissue. Inoculated fruit were held under high humidity at 21-23C for two to three days prior to scoring. Degree of soft rot decay was determined via fruit weight loss from two replicates of the experiment over the course of the growing season. Significant differences were not evident among varieties or experiment dates for weight loss due to tissue decay. Hypodermic puncture inoculation was superior to other methods for inducing fruit rot.

Free access

Robert W. Goth, Ernest W. Goins, and Kathleen G. Haynes

Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) is a serious aphid transmitted virus disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Field observations suggest that the cv. BelRus is tolerant to PLRV. Greenhouse grown BelRus and PLRV susceptible potato cvs. Green Mountain and Katahdin were tested for PLRV with enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and subsequently infested with PLRV infected green peach aphids (Myzus persicae). ELISA was used to test leaves from the top, middle and bottom portion of the plants at 7 day intervals beginning 7 days after aphid infestation. PLRV was detected in all tested locations of the Green Mountain and Katahdin plants 21 days after inoculation. In BelRus, throughout the 11 week test, PLRV was detected predominantly in the top portion of the plants and at low titres. These results suggest that tolerance to PLRV infection in the cv. BelRus may be due to suppression of virus replication.

Free access

Kathleen G. Haynes, William E. Potts, Jesse L. Chittams, and Diane L. Fleck

For the yellow-flesh fresh market, potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) varieties with intense yellow flesh are desired. Twenty-five yellow-flesh clones, including 24 U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) selections and the check variety `Yukon Gold', were evaluated for tuber yellow-flesh color, as measured by a reflectance colorimeter, and for individual tuber weight in replicated field trials in Presque Isle, Maine, in 1991 and 1992. There were significant differences among clones for yellow-flesh intensity. Yellow-flesh intensity in two USDA selections was significantly less than in `Yukon Gold'. In four USDA selections, yellow-flesh intensity was significantly greater than in `Yukon Gold'. In general, there was an inverse relationship between tuber weight and yellow-flesh intensity. Subsamples of tubers whose weight fell between the 10 to 90, 25 to 75, 35 to 65, and 40 to 60 percentile were compared to the full sample. There was good agreement between the 10 to 90 and 25 to 75 percentile subsample and the full sample regarding the average yellow-flesh intensity and in the consistency of pairwise comparisons between individual selections and `Yukon Gold'. For determining yellow-flesh intensity, the 25 to 75 percentile subsample was as informative as the full sample.

Free access

Kathleen G. Haynes, Joseph B. Sieczka, Melvin R. Henninger, and Diane L. Fleck

For the yellow-flesh fresh market, potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars with intense yellow-flesh are desired. The effects of clone, environment and clone × environment interactions on the intensity of the yellow-flesh trait in tetraploid potatoes were investigated. Twenty-four yellow-flesh clones, including 23 USDA selections and the check cultivar Yukon Gold, were evaluated for tuber yellow-flesh color as measured by a reflectance colorimeter in replicated field trials in Presque Isle, Maine in 1991 and 1992, and in Riverhead, N.Y., and Bridgeton, N.J., in 1992 and 1993. There were significant differences among environments and among clones for yellow-flesh intensity. The clone × environment interaction was also significant. Broad-sense heritability of yellow-flesh intensity was estimated as 0.93 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.92-0.97. The instabilities noted in some of these clones, although statistically significant, are of limited practical concern. The intensity of yellow-flesh will be an important trait for breeders to select in developing new yellow-flesh cultivars. However, in testing yellow-flesh clones for future cultivar release, the role of environment and clone environment interactions on other agronomic traits will probably be more important than the environment and clone environment interactions on the intensity of yellow-flesh.

Free access

Aref A. Abdul-Baki, John R. Teasdale, Robert W. Goth, and Kathleen G. Haynes

The use of mulches in vegetable production is undergoing a radical change away from high-input, nonrenewable resources, such as plastic, to the use of high-residue organic mulches from cover crops. The purpose of this study was to compare the marketable yield of various fresh-market tomato genotypes when grown under plastic and hairy vetch mulches. In 1996 and 1997, 12 fresh-market tomato genotypes were evaluated for yield on the North Farm of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), MD in a randomized split-plot design. Tomatoes were grown in conventional tillage plastic mulch (PM) and no-till hairy vetch mulch (HVM). Early blight, caused by Alternaria solani Sor., developed naturally in the plots both years and was recorded over time. All 12 genotypes were susceptible to early blight. Area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) was calculated for each plot. AUDPC was similar both years. However, the year × mulch and year × mulch × genotype interactions were significant for AUDPC. Adjusting yields for AUDPC had a minimal effect on the data. Overall, yields were similar in PM and HVM both before and after adjusting for AUDPC. However, the mulch × genotype interaction was significant. The yield of eight of the genotypes was significantly higher in the HVM than in the PM system both years, ranging from 12% to 57% higher in 1996 and 10% to 48% higher in 1997. There was no yield difference for one genotype in HVM as compared to PM. The yield in the remaining three genotypes was either higher under HVM than PM or there was no difference. As yields from the HVM system are greater than or equal to yields in the PM system, soil compaction is reduced and nitrogen inputs are lower. The no-till HVM system is at least as good, and often better, than the conventional tillage PM system.