Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Kanogwan Kerdnaimongkol x
Clear All Modify Search

Transgenic tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Ohio 8245') expressing an antisense catalase gene (ASTOMCAT1) were used to test the hypothesis that modification of the reactive oxygen species scavenging mechanism in plants can lead to changes in oxidative stress tolerance. A 2- to 8-fold reduction in total catalase activity was detected in the leaf extracts of transformants. A 2-fold increase in levels of H2O2 was observed in the transgenic plants with reduced catalase activity. Electrophoretic characterization of multiple catalase isoforms revealed the specific suppression of CAT1 in transgenic plants. Homozygous plants carrying the antisense catalase transgene were used to study the effect of alteration in the expression of catalase on stress tolerance. Transgenic plants treated with 3% H2O2 showed visible damage within 24 hours and subsequently died. In contrast, wild-type and azygous control plants recovered from the treatment. Transgenic plants did not survive 4 °C chilling stress compared to control wild-type and azygous lines. Physiological analysis of these plants indicated that suppression of catalase activity in transgenic tomato led to enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress. Our data support a role for catalase in oxidative stress defense system in tomato.

Free access

Diurnal variation in the chilling sensitivity of tomato seedlings was examined. Sensitivity to chilling in tomato seedlings is a response to light and not under the control of a circadian rhythm. Chilling sensitivity is highest in seedlings chilled at the end of the dark period, and these seedlings become more resistant to chilling injury upon exposure to the light. Diurnal variation in chilling sensitivity was associated with changes in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. The results show an increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at the end of the light period. The recovery of the net photosynthesis rate following chilling was faster in seedlings chilled at the end of the light period. It is suggested that an increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at the end of light period before the chilling plays a role in the resistance to chilling stress in tomato seedlings. Forty-eight hours of 14°C acclimation or hydrogen peroxide pretreatment conferred chilling tolerance to tomato seedlings and were correlated with elevated catalase activity. Acclimated seedlings still exhibited diurnal variation in chilling sensitivity while hydrogen peroxide treated seedlings showed little evidence of a diurnal variation in chilling sensitivity. Transgenic tomato plants expressing an antisense catalase gene were generated. A several-fold decrease in total catalase has been detected in the leaf extracts of transformants. Preliminary analysis of these plants indicated that modification of reactive oxygen species scavenging in plant system can lead to change in oxidative stress tolerance.

Free access

Diurnal variation in the chilling sensitivity of `Rutgers' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings was examined. Chilling sensitivity was highest in seedlings chilled at the end of the dark period, and these seedlings became more resistant to chilling injury on exposure to the light. The development of chilling tolerance in tomato seedlings was a response to light and not under the control of a circadian rhythm. The recovery of leaf gas exchange following chilling was faster in seedlings chilled at the end of the light period. Diurnal variation in chilling sensitivity was associated with changes in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. An increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities was observed at the end of the light period. Catalase activity was significantly higher in all stages of chilling following the light period compared to those chilled after the end of the dark period. Forty-eight hours of 14 °C acclimation or pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide conferred increased chilling tolerance to tomato seedlings. Hydrogen peroxide-treated seedlings showed little evidence of a diurnal variation in chilling sensitivity. These results support a role for light and oxidative stress in conferring increased chilling tolerance to tomato seedlings.

Free access