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Open access

R. A. Jones, P. G. Smith, A. H. Millett, and K. A. Kimble

Abstract

‘Royal Red Cherry’ and ‘Short Red Cherry’ are indeterminate, fruitful and multiple disease resistant tomato cultivars. ‘Royal Red Cherry’ is similar to ‘Large Red Cherry’ and ‘Jumbo Cherry’ in fruit size and quality, but is a more prolific yielder. ‘Short Red Cherry’ has a more compact vine type that is based on the brachytic (br) gene and it is most desirable for the patio, container gardener. ‘Short Red Cherry’ is generally earlier in production pattern than ‘Royal Red Cherry’.

Free access

C.J. Coyne, D.C. Smith, S.A. Mehlenbacher, K.B. Johnson, and J.N. Pinkerton

Resistant cultivars are a promising disease control method for eastern filbert blight, which is devastating hazelnut production in Oregon. In 1990, two studies were begun to evaluate the relative resistance of European hazelnut (Coyhls avellana) genotypes to the causal fungus, Anisogramma anomala. A randomized block design of 40 genotypes was planted using inoculated trees planted in the borders as the disease source. The first- and second-year disease incidence (percent) were compared to the published disease incidence (percent) based on exposing potted trees of 44 genotypes to high doses of inoculum. Disease incidence was significantly correlated between the two studies in 1991 (r =0.41, P = 0.02) and in 1992 (r =0.64, P = 0.001; rs = 0.35, 0.025 < P < 0.050). Three genotypes, however, showed no disease in the field, but they had disease in >70% of the potted tree study. A plot of disease incidence in the field planting indicates that the inoculum was present throughout the blocks.

Free access

Mark A. Walker, Dale M. Smith, K. Peter Pauls, and Bryan D. McKersie

The chilling tolerance of commercial Lycopersicon esculentum cultivars (H2653, H722), Solanum lycopersicoides, an F1 hybrid of S. lycopersicoides × Sub-Arctic Maxi, and 25 BC2F2 lines of L. hirsutum × H722 (backcrossed twice to H722) was evaluated using a chlorophyll fluorescence assay. The ratio of the initial to the peak fluorescence (Fo: Fp) measured from fully expanded leaves was chosen as an indicator of plant health. Chilling induced an increase in Fo: Fp that was correlated with the sensitivity of the plant to low-temperature stress. Values of Fo: Fp remained low for cold-treated S. lycopersicoides and the F1 hybrid, which showed few symptoms of chilling-related damage, whereas the commercial cultivars, which were essentially intolerant to low temperatures, had large increases in Fo: Fp. A full range of Fo: Fp values was measured in the 25 BC2F2 lines, indicating that some chilling tolerance from the L. hirsutum parent was expressed by plants in these populations.

Free access

H.G. Taber, D.F. Cox, B.C. Smith, and K.A. Klock

Sap nitrate was determined with the ion-selective electrodes, HACH combination nitrate electrode, and the CARDY nitrate meter on pepper petioles over five sample dates (n = 160). The electrode values were compared to the Cd reduction method performed on a Lachat automated ion analyzer with flow injection analysis. Thirty petioles were collected from plots of each of several N rate studies and the sap expressed by a hand-held garlic press. Correlation among the techniques were similar (r > 0.9), but the CARDY meter constantly read 100 to 175 ppm higher than the HACH. Across all dates the standard deviation of the difference, compared with the Cd reduction, for the HACH = 16 ppm, while for the CARDY it was 50. While the CARDY meter is easier to use and has fewer steps, the HACH electrode values were closer to the true readings and less erratic. One must use care when interpreting nitrate sufficiency value ranges with different quick-test techniques.

Free access

K.J. Vining, Q. Zhang, A.O. Tucker, C. Smith, and T.M. Davis

Mentha longifolia, a wild relative of the polyploid, cultivated Mentha (mint) species, was evaluated as a potential model system for genetic research relevant to the cultivated mints. Fourteen Mentha longifolia accessions maintained by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR), were highly diverse with respect to geographic origin, oil composition, verticillium wilt resistance, aspects of morphology, and molecular marker polymorphism. Accession CMEN 584 was the only carvone chemotype, while CMEN 682 was the only accession with high menthol content. Trans-piperitone oxide was the primary oil component of accessions CMEN 17 and CMEN 18, while pulegone was most abundant in CMEN 20, CMEN 500, CMEN 501, and CMEN 585. Four accessions—CMEN 585, CMEN 17, CMEN 501, and CMEN 81—were consistently resistant to verticillium wilt, while CMEN 584 and CMEN 516 were highly susceptible. Pairwise similarity coefficients were calculated and a UPGMA (unweighted pair-group analysis) tree was constructed on the basis of 63 informative randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker bands. CMEN 585 and CMEN 584 shared the greatest number of bands (16), and formed a distinct cluster in the UPGMA tree. Seven pairs of accessions had no bands in common, emphasizing the high degree of molecular diversity represented by these accessions. The favorable features of diploid (2n = 2x = 24) genome constitution, comparatively small genome size (400 to 500 Mb), self-fertility, fecundity, and diversity with respect to economically relevant traits, contribute to M. longifolia's potential usefulness as a model system for the cultivated mints. As a perennial species amenable to vegetative propagation, M. longifolia's spectrum of susceptibility/resistance to an important vascular wilt disease encourages its further evaluation as a system for broader studies of plant–microbe interactions and disease resistance mechanisms.

Free access

James L. Green, R.G. Linderman, B. Blackburn, and K.A. Smith

Verticle gradients of moisture, salinity, specific fertilizer ions, and pH in the root zone in the closed, insulated pallet system (CIPS) are relatively stable compared with those in the open container system (OCS). Establishment of the VA mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and maintenance of the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae were greater in CIPS than in control OCS. In CIPS, percent corn root length colonized by G. intraradices was greatest in roots in the top stratum of the root medium. Colonization was significantly greater in copper-coated root-containment pouches. Population maintenance in CIPS of T. harzianum, initially uniformly inoculated throughout the root medium, was highest in the top stratum of the root medium where K+ and \batchmode \documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amsmath} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \(\mathrm{NO}_{3}^{-}\) \end{document} concentrations were highest. Efficacy of S. carpocapsae in parasitizing Galleria mellonella larvae, while greater in CIPS, was significantly related to host plant in CIPS but not in OCS. Inoculation with bacterial antagonists Bacillus cereus, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Serratia plymuthica significantly increased plant growth in CIPS, but not in OCS. Phytophthora cinnomomi root rot infection readily occurred in inoculated plants, but did not spread to noninoculated plants in CIPS when roots were contained within plant pouches. Because of the stability of the root zone parameters and the lack of leaching-dilution of exudates, volatiles, and other materials from the root zone, CIPS is an excellent system for evaluating effects of microorganism and other factors on root growth and development.

Open access

Melinda A. Miller-Butler, Barbara J. Smith, Brian R. Kreiser, and Eugene K. Blythe

Strawberry anthracnose diseases are caused primarily by three Colletotrichum species: C. acutatum J.H. Simmonds, C. fragariae A.N. Brooks, and C. gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. & Sacc. Molecular markers are being used in breeding programs to identify alleles linked to disease resistance and other positive agronomic traits. In our study, strawberry cultivars and breeding germplasm with known anthracnose susceptibility or resistance to the three anthracnose-causing Colletotrichum species were screened for two sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers linked to the Rca2 gene. The Rca2 resistant allele SCAR markers were associated with varying degrees of significance for a strawberry plant’s anthracnose resistance to C. fragariae but not to C. acutatum or C. gloeosporioides. Although the presence or absence of the markers associated with the Rca2 resistance gene is an imperfect indicator of anthracnose resistance, it may serve as a useful starting point in selecting germplasm for breeding programs.

Open access

Melinda A. Miller-Butler, Barbara J. Smith, Kenneth J. Curry, and Eugene K. Blythe

Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide an accurate, rapid, nondestructive method of identifying anthracnose-resistant germplasm. The purpose of this study was to statistically compare two methods (visual and image analysis) of evaluating disease severity of strawberry germplasm screened for anthracnose resistance. Detached leaves of 77 susceptible and resistant strawberry clones were inoculated with one Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. & Sacc. and two C. fragariae A. N. Brooks isolates. Anthracnose disease symptoms on each leaf were assessed quantitatively via computer-based image analysis to determine percentage lesion area and qualitatively by two independent raters using a visual disease severity rating scale (0 = no symptoms to 5 = entire leaf dead). The two visual raters’ average disease severity ratings (n = 3413) were in substantial agreement with a weighted Cohen’s kappa coefficient (k) of 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79–0.82]. There was a strong positive correlation between percent lesion area determined by image analysis and the visual disease scores of the two raters (r p = 0.79). Image analysis provided a precise measurement of percent lesion area of infected leaves while visual assessment provided more rapid results. Our results indicate that detached leaf inoculations can be used as a rapid preliminary screen to separate anthracnose-susceptible from -resistant germplasm in large populations within breeding programs. It also may be used for assessing the resistance/susceptibility of parental breeding lines to various Colletotrichum species and isolates, for mapping germplasm for resistance genes, and in pesticide development studies.

Open access

Joseph D. Norton, J. M. Snell, D. A. Smith, and K. S. Rymal

Abstract

‘AU-Roadside’ is a new plum cultivar developed by the Dept. of Horticulture, Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn Univ., for growing in areas where chilling of 700 hr of temperature below 7°C occurs. ‘AU-Roadside’ has produced high yields of excellent quality fruit where certain fruit problems and diseases occur.

Open access

J. D. Norton, R. D. Cosper, D. A. Smith, and K. S. Rymal

Abstract

‘AUrora’ is a multiple disease resistant muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cultivar developed by the Dept. of Horticulture, Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn Univ., adapted to growing conditions in the Southeastern United States. ‘AUrora’ has resistance to downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis), powdery mildew, (Spherotheca fuliginea), and gummy stem blight (Didymella bryoniae). ‘AUrora’ is especially suited for home, local and commercial markets where “jumbo” size fruit is preferred.