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  • Author or Editor: K.A. Moore x
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Salvia (Salvia splendens) `Red Vista' or `Purple Vista,' french marigold (Tagetes patula) `Little Hero Orange,' bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) `Better Bell,' impatiens (Impatiens wallerana) `Accent White,' and wax begonia (Begonia ×semperflorens-cultorum) `Cocktail Vodka' were grown in 0.95-L (1-qt) containers using a 5 pine bark: 4 sedge peat: 1 sand substrate (Expts. 1 and 2) or Pro Mix BX (Expt. 2 only). They were fertilized weekly with 50 mL (1.7 fl oz) of a solution containing 100, 200, or 300 mg·L-1 (ppm) of nitrogen derived from 15N-6.5P-12.5K (1N-1P2O5-1K2O ratio) or 21N-3P-11.7K (3N-1P2O5-2K2O ratio) uncoated prills used in the manufacture of controlled-release fertilizers. Plants grown with Pro Mix BX were generally larger and produced more flowers or fruit than those grown with the pine bark mix. With few exceptions, plant color, root and shoot dry weights, and number of flowers or fruit were highly correlated with fertilization rate, but not with prill type. There appears to be little reason for using the more expensive 1-1-1 ratio prills, since they generally did not improve plant quality and may increase phosphorous runoff from bedding plant nurseries.

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Growth of hand-watered and subirrigated `Ultra Red' petunia (Petunia ×hybrida Hort.) and `Super Elfin Violet' impatiens (Impatiens wallerana Hook.f.) plants were compared when grown using four controlled-release fertilizer rates and four fertilizer placements in the pot. Furthermore, the amount of NO3-N leached from hand-watered plants was compared to amount captured by subirrigation system. Before planting, Osmocote (14N-6.2P-11.6K) (4 month release) was either topdressed (TD), layered in the middle of the pot (M), layered at the bottom of the pot (B), or incorporated throughout (I) the substrate at 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, or 7.5 kg·m-3 (oz/ft3). Shoot dry mass of petunia plants was similar between both irrigation systems and among the four fertilizer placements. Subirrigated petunias fertilized with 2.5 kg·m-3 had similar shoot dry mass as hand-watered petunias fertilized with 7.5 kg·m-3. Hand-watered impatiens had greater shoot dry mass than subirrigated impatiens. Hand-watered impatiens also had greater shoot dry mass in pots with fertilizer at TD, M, or I than with fertilizer at B, but no difference in growth was observed in subirrigated impatiens among the different fertilizer placements. Finally, significantly more NO3-N was leached from hand-watered plants than was captured with the subirrigation systems.

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Areca palms [Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.], spathiphyllums (Spathiphyllum Schott. `Figaro'), ixoras (Ixora L. `Nora Grant'), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Floramerica'), marigolds (Tagetes erecta L. `Inca Gold'), bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L. `Better Bell'), and pentas [Pentas lanceolata (Forssk.) Deflers. `Cranberry'] were grown in a pine bark-based potting substrate and were fertilized weekly with 0, 8, 16, 32, or 64 mg (1.0 oz = 28,350 mg) of P per pot. Shoot, and to a much lesser extent, root dry weight, increased for all species as weekly P fertilization rate was increased from 0 to 8 mg/pot. As P fertilization was increased from 8 to 64 mg/pot, neither roots nor shoots of most species showed any additional growth in response to increased P. Root to shoot ratio decreased sharply as P fertilization rate was increased from 0 to 8 mg/pot, but remained relatively constant in response to further increases in P fertilization rate.

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In this study, areca palm (Dypsis lutescens), crossandra (Crossandra infundibuliformis), pentas (Pentas lanceolat), and philodendron (Philodendron) `Hope' plants were transplanted into containers filled with four growing substrates and watered daily, every 2 days, or every 3 days using subirrigation or overhead irrigation. Plants were grown in either a pine bark/sedge peat/sand substrate (BSS), Metro-mix 500 (MM), Pro-mix GSX (PM), or a 60% biosolid substrate (SYT). For both irrigation systems, final shoot dry weight of pentas, crossandra, philodendron, and areca palm plants in each substrate was greatest for plants watered every day and least for plants watered every 3 days. At all three irrigation frequencies, pentas, crossandra, and philodendron shoot dry weight in subirrigated pots filled with PM was greater than in overhead watered pots filled with PM. PM had the highest total pore space and moisture content of the four substrates examined. There was no difference in pentas, crossandra, or philodendron shoot dry weight between the irrigation systems, at all three irrigation frequencies, when plants were grown in BSS, MM, or SYT. However, for all four substrates and at all three irrigation frequencies, areca palm shoot dry weight was greater in overhead watered pots than in subirrigated pots. The final substrate electrical conductivity (EC) in all four subirrigated palm substrates was more than double the concentrations in overhead watered palm substrates. In this study, largest pentas, crossandra, and philodendron plants were grown in pots filled with PM and subirrigated daily, while largest areca palm plants were grown in pots filled with MM or SYT and watered overhead daily.

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Two experiments were conducted to compare the growth of `Ultra White' petunia (Petunia ×hybrida) plants in a subirrigation system versus in a hand-watered system. In Expt. 1, petunia plants were watered with 50, 100, or 150 ppm (mg·L-1) of N of Peter's 20-10-20 (20N-4.4P-16.6K) and in Expt. 2, Nutricote 13-13-13 (13N-5.8P-10.8K) type 100, a controlled release fertilizer, was incorporated into the growing substrate, prior to transplanting, at rates of 3, 6, or 9 lb/yard3 (1.8, 3.6, or 4.5 kg·m-3). In both experiments, there was no difference in petunia shoot dry mass or final flower number between the irrigation systems at the lowest fertilization rate but differences were evident at the higher fertilization rates. In Expt. 1, shoot dry mass and flower number of subirrigated petunia plants fertilized with 100 ppm of N was greater than for hand-watered plants fertilized at the same rate. However, subirrigated petunia plants fertilized with 150 ppm of N were smaller with fewer flowers than hand-watered petunia plants fertilized with 150 ppm of N. Substrate electrical conductivity (EC) concentrations for petunia plants subirrigated with 150 ppm of N were 4.9 times greater than concentrations in pots hand-watered with 150 ppm of N. In Expt. 2, subirrigated petunia plants fertilized with 6 and 9 lb/yard3 were larger with more flowers than hand-watered plants fertilized at the same rates. Although substrate EC concentrations were greater in subirrigated substrates than in hand-watered substrates, substrate EC concentrations of all hand-watered plants were about 0.35 dS·m-1. Subirrigation benches similar to those used in these experiments, appear to be a viable method for growing `Ultra White' petunia plants. However, the use of Peter's 20-10-20 at concentrations greater than 100 ppm of N with subirrigation appeared to be detrimental to petunia growth probably because of high EC concentrations in the substrate. On the other hand, the use of subirrigation with Nutricote 13-13-13 type 100 incorporated at all of the rates tested did not appear to be detrimental to petunia growth.

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Abstract

Potato tubers of Solanum tuberosum cv. Kennebec, produced at elevations from 1533 to 3198 m at 2 levels of insolation per site were grown in a greenhouse at 1533 m to determine the effect of the parental clone's environment on the performance of the succeeding generation. Rate of emergence, early vegetative growth, and tuber growth increased with increasing elevation of the parental clone but there was no significant difference in vegetative growth or tuber yield at vine senescence. The environment of the parental clone had no direct influence on the photosynthetic activity of the clonal progeny, but an inverse relationship between bulking efficiency and altitude of seed tuber production was evident. Shading of the parental clone at each elevation had little influence on the succeeding generation.

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As the horticulture industry enters the 21st century, advances in horticulture science will continue to be more rapid and frequent creating the need for more innovative approaches in information delivery. Moreover, decentralization continues to be a widespread trend. Land-grant universities have a long tradition of providing outreach, but with the development of new telecommunication technologies, larger audiences now can be reached. Many universities throughout the world have developed distance education programs through the use of modern telecommunication technologies. However, the University of Florida has responded to the needs of place-bound students by developing off-campus resident Bachelor of Science (BS) degree programs in horticulture at three locations in the state. These off-campus programs combine on-site instruction augmented with distance education courses to giveplace-bound students a flexible, efficient, and interactive alternative to degree programs offered at the main campus.

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The Oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora capsici, causes root, crown, and fruit rot of winter squash (Cucurbita moschata) and limits production. Some C. moschata cultivars develop age-related resistance (ARR), whereby fruit develop resistance to P. capsici 14 to 21 days postpollination (DPP) because of thickened exocarp; however, wounding negates ARR. We uncovered the genetic mechanisms of ARR of two C. moschata cultivars, Chieftain and Dickenson Field, that exhibit ARR at 14 and 21 DPP, respectively, using RNA sequencing. The sequencing was conducted using RNA samples from ‘Chieftain’ and ‘Dickenson Field’ fruit at 7, 10, 14, and 21 DPP. A differential expression and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of upregulated genes in functional categories relevant to cell wall structure biosynthesis, cell wall modification/organization, transcription regulation, and metabolic processes. A pathway enrichment analysis detected upregulated genes in cutin, suberin monomer, and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways. A further analysis of the expression profile of genes in those pathways revealed upregulation of genes in monolignol biosynthesis and lignin polymerization in the resistant fruit peel. Our findings suggest a shift in gene expression toward the physical strengthening of the cell wall associated with ARR to P. capsici. These findings provide candidate genes for developing Cucurbita cultivars with resistance to P. capsici and improve fruit rot management in Cucurbita species.

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Ilex cornuta Lindl. & Paxt. ‘Burfordii Nana’ (dwarf burford holly), Pittosporum tobira [Dryand]. ‘Variegata’ (pittosporum), and Viburnum odorotissimum Ker Gawl. (sweet viburnum) were transplanted into field plots in an open-sided, clear polyethylene-covered shelter to evaluate growth, aesthetic quality, and establishment rates in response to 2-, 4-, or 7-d irrigation frequencies. Establishment was delayed 1 to 2 months for I. cornuta ‘Burrford Nana’ irrigated every 7 d compared with 2- and 4-d frequencies; however, growth and aesthetic quality were similar among treatments. Plants irrigated every 7 d also had higher cumulative water stress levels. Leaf area, shoot dry weight, and total biomass increased among P. tobira ‘Variegata’ and V. odorotissimum irrigated every 2 d. Pittosporum tobira ‘Variegata’ and V. odorotissimum irrigated every 2 d also had greater canopy size and root dry weight, respectively. Neither cumulative water stress nor establishment was affected by irrigation frequency for either species.

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Previous research on #3 nursery container-grown shrubs suggests that some common shrub species could be established in the Florida landscape under natural rainfall when irrigated with 3 L of water every 4 days in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 8b and 9a or every 2 days in zone 10b until first roots reached the canopy edge (≈20 weeks after planting). The current study evaluated the effects of these irrigation frequency recommendations on plant vigor, canopy growth, root growth, and aesthetic quality of 21 common landscape shrub species (10 Florida native and 11 non-native) planted in Florida in zones 8b, 9a, or 10b. Data suggests that it may be appropriate to adopt the 20-week low-volume irrigation recommendations for the establishment of a wide variety of container-grown Florida native and non-native shrubs. However, Florida native and non-native shrubs should be monitored for symptoms of drought stress for 2 years after planting.

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