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  • Author or Editor: K. S. Rymal x
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Abstract

A portable, rapid, and relatively simple spot test is applied to the determination of ascorbic acid in the juice from single fruit of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). For this application reference strips with ranges of 12.5 to 100 mg/ml (± 12.5 mg/ml) and 30 to 46 mg/ml ±2 mg/ml were prepared. Standard titrimetric estimations conducted on the same samples consistently confirmed the spot test results.

Open Access

Abstract

The force necessary to puncture pods of southernpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) walp) was measured with a Model 1122 Instron fitted with a 1 mm diameter stainless steel probe. ‘California Blackeye No. 5’ and the breeding lines CR 22-2-21 and Ala 963.8 represented types with low, intermediate and high pod factor resistance, respectively, to the cowpea curculio, Chal-codermus aeneus (Boh.). Pods were selected at 7 stages of maturity for each type. There were no consistent differences in pod puncture force at the 3 immature stages, but at the 4 mature stages pod puncture forces for the resistant lines were significantly higher than for the susceptible cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

Thermal blast peeling yielded products of comparable quality to freeze–heat-peeled tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Both methods resulted in higher peeled yields and firmer fruit than did caustic, steam-peeling, or peeling by scalding. Thermal blast peeling may thus be a practical alternative to traditional methods.

Open Access

Abstract

Bighart, an improved Pimiento pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) variety (Fig. 1), was developed at the Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, and released to the Associated Pimiento Canners in February 1969. Bighart averaged 74% more yield than the commercial Truhart variety in 2 years’ trials at the North Alabama Horticulture Substation, Cullman, Alabama. Bighart fruits were 37% heavier, had 13% thicker walls and gave a 10% higher recovery of canned product than those of Truhart. In addition, the concentrated fruit set and fruit maturity of Bighart promises suitability for machine harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

In the article “AU-Jubilant' and ‘AU–Producer’ Watermelons“ by J.D. Norton, R.D. Cosper, D.A. Smith, and K.S. Rymal (HortScience 21:1460–1461, Dec. 1986), the following corrections should be noted: The legends to Figs. 3 and 4 were reversed. The legend to Fig. 3 should read “Fruit of ‘AUProducer’ watermelon.”; the legend to Fig. 4 should read “Fruit of ‘AU–Jubilant’ watermelon.” In the legend to Fig. 1, the word should be “Pedigree”. In the literature citations, ref. 1 should read J. Amer. Soc. Hort Sci. instead of HortScience, and, in ref. 7, the volume number should read 105 instead of 195.

Open Access

Abstract

‘AUrora’ is a multiple disease resistant muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cultivar developed by the Dept. of Horticulture, Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn Univ., adapted to growing conditions in the Southeastern United States. ‘AUrora’ has resistance to downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis), powdery mildew, (Spherotheca fuliginea), and gummy stem blight (Didymella bryoniae). ‘AUrora’ is especially suited for home, local and commercial markets where “jumbo” size fruit is preferred.

Open Access

Abstract

‘AU-Roadside’ is a new plum cultivar developed by the Dept. of Horticulture, Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn Univ., for growing in areas where chilling of 700 hr of temperature below 7°C occurs. ‘AU-Roadside’ has produced high yields of excellent quality fruit where certain fruit problems and diseases occur.

Open Access

Abstract

Prevalence of diseases, particularly anthracnose, fusarium wilt, and gummy stem blight, is a major factor limiting production of watermelons in the southern United States. Although satisfactory control of anthracnose and gummy stem blight may be accomplished with the proper application of organic fungicides during normal weather conditions, chemical control is not effective during periods of high humidity and rainfall. Furthermore, the 3 leading cultivars, Charleston Gray, Jubilee, and Crimson Sweet, are not resistant to either anthracnose or gummy stem blight (1,2, 7).

Open Access

Abstract

Fatty acids of the seed oils of ‘Chico Grande’, ‘Rutgers’, and ‘Golden Jubilee’ tomatoes, determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), showed no significant quantitative or qualitative differences among cultivars. The major fatty acids were linoleic, 58.0%; oleic, 19.9%; palmitic, 15.6% and stearic, 4.5%. Seven minor acids included linolenic, 1.8%; and trace amounts of myristic, myristoleic, palmitoleic, margaric, arachidic, and a 17 C acid not identified.

Sixteen amino acids of the solvent extracted seed meals, determined by ion exchange chromatography, showed significant quantitative differences among the 3 cultivars in glutamic acid, glycine, tyrosine, arginine, and lysine. ‘Golden Jubilee’ seed meal protein contained 10.22% lysine compared to 9.23% for ‘Rutgers’, 9.04% for ‘Chico Grande’ and 7.63% for commercial soybean meal. The tomato seed meals were significantly different from the soybean meal in 10 of 16 amino acids. Soybean meal was higher in threonine, serine, and histidine than any of the tomato seed meals and higher than one of them in leucine and isoleucine. All the tomato seed meals and soybean meal were low in methionine.

Open Access