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  • Author or Editor: K. R. Scott x
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Abstract

Visible injury in chilled avocados (Persea americana Mill.) was observed first in the distal end of fruit. The proximal end remained apparently unaffected unless exposure to chilling temperature was prolonged. In contrast, the concentration of endogenous Ca of individual fruit was always highest in the proximal end and lowest in the distal end. Severity of visible injury in stored fruit was significantly reduced when Ca was applied to harvested fruit by vacuum infiltration of CaCI2·

Open Access

`Delicious' (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) apples were kept in sealed polyethylene bags (thickness 0.05 mm) and exposed to ethanol, propan-1-ol, butan-1-ol, and pentan-1-ol during storage at 0 °C. Rates of application varied from 1.85 to 120 mmol·kg-1. Complete control of superficial scald was achieved using 30 mmol·kg-1 of fruit with butan-1-ol or propan-1-ol; ethanol required 120 mmol·kg-1 to control the disorder, but at this concentration, purpling of the red skin occurred. Butan-1-ol and propan-1-ol did not affect the color. Pentan-1-ol caused severe skin injury resembling soft or deep scald of `Jonathan' apples. Apples were also kept in high purity N at 20 °C for up to 8 days before storage at 0 °C. Complete control of scald occurred with a 6- or 8-day exposure to N. Control of scald appears to be due to the accumulation of ethanol during exposure to N. Nitrogen treatments did not affect skin color.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Ethephon applications at 250 to 1500 ppm rates during final swell of ‘Babygold-9’, a clingstone peach, accelerated maturation as measured by firmness and skin and flesh color changes and reduced titratable acidity. High rates were phytotoxic and detrimental to fruit quality. Increased immature fruit abscission appears to limit the practical use of ethephon at this growth stage in peach.

Open Access

Abstract

Respiration at 20°C of carrot roots (Daucus carota L.), potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) and zucchini fruits (Cucurbita pepo L.) was reduced following exposure to either high levels of CO2 or low levels of O2 for a few days at 20°C. The reduced respiration rates were maintained for at least 2 weeks after treatment while the produce was ventilated with air.

Open Access

Abstract

Bitter pit was controlled and senescence delayed in apples stored at ambient temperature (~20°C) by dipping the fruit in calcium chloride after harvest. The application of a partial vacuum while fruit were submerged was the most effective method. This permitted rinsing of the fruit afterwards to reduce the likelihood of skin injury.

Open Access

Abstract

The application of methyl linoleate to ‘Jonathan’ apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) after harvest reduced the level of hexanol in the fruit and the incidence of soft scald that developed in the fruit during cool storage.

Open Access

Abstract

For the control of soft scald of ‘Jonathan’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), a dip containing both diphenylamine and a vegetable oil was generally more effective and was considered to be more desirable than the use of either compound alone.

Open Access

Abstract

CaCl2 dips reduced the incidence of storage breakdown in ‘Jonathan’, ‘Cox’s Orange Pippin’ and ‘Twenty Ounce’ apples. The use of CaCl2, benomyl and diphenylamine in a single dip further enhanced the effect of CaCl2 The uptake of water into fruit was increased by reducing the dip temperature from 20° to 5°C or by increasing the dip time from 0.5 to 30 minutes but CaCl2 dipping was no more effective in controlling breakdown at 5° than at 20°.

Open Access

Cyperus kyllingia and Cyperus brevifolius are problematic turfgrass weeds in Hawaii. Both are closely related weed species with similar morphology and growth characteristics. C. kyllingia appears to be a more successful weed with regards to interference than C. brevifolius. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to compare the levels of interference exerted by C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius upon Cynodon dactylon turfgrass. C. kyllingia reduced the growth of C. dactylon by about 50 %, while C. brevifolius did not significantly reduce C. dactylon growth. These results correspond with the chemical profiles of C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius. Analysis has shown that C. kyllingia contains two sesquiterpenes which have been identified as potentially allelopathic components of Cyperus rotundus. C. brevifolius contains waxes and the two sesquiterpenes found in C. kyllingia are absent. This suggests that allelopathy may be the mechanism responsible for the different levels of interference exhibited by C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius, and these species may provide an important model for the study of allelopathy.

Free access

Abstract

The application of fat soluble antioxidants to ‘Jonathan’ apples (Malu.s domestics Borkh.) after harvest reduced the incidence of soft scald which developed in the fruit during cool storage, increased the amount of unsaturated fatty acidss in the surface lipids, and reduced the level of hexanol in the fruit. Diphenylamine, butylated hydroxvanisole and ethoxvquin were the most effective of the compounds tested.

Open Access