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  • Author or Editor: K. L. Olsen x
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Abstract

Excellent firmness retention in ‘Golden Delicious’ apples was achieved in a “rapid CA” (rapid reduction of O2 by use of N2 flushing) storage procedure. Pretreatment of the fruit with high levels of CO2 prior to rapid CA had little or no effect on firmness. Higher flesh calcium content was beneficial in firmness retention when fruit was stored in air, in “slow CA” (O2 reduced by fruit respiration), or held in air for 10 days prior to rapid CA. Rapid CA provides an effective means to control softening in ‘Golden Delicious’ apples and to avoid injury caused by calcium and high CO2 treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Delicious’ apples treated with a 1,000 ppm spray of succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) at 70 to 80 days after full bloom were firmer than control fruit at harvest and remained firmer throughout the 9-month storage period.

Open Access

Abstract

Studies of low-O2 storage of ‘Delicious’ apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) were conducted in Oregon (1981), Washington (1982), and British Columbia (1981 and 1982). A combination of 1% O2 with 1% CO2 was the most promising for control of storage scald and quality preservation of ‘Delicious’ apple fruit grown in Oregon. A combination of 1% O2 with <0.03% CO2 effectively reduced or eliminated the incidence of storage scald and preserved dessert quality of apples grown in Washington. Early-harvested apples from British Columbia developed a high incidence of storage scald after 7 months of storage in 1% O2 with 0.05% CO2. Apples harvested at commercial maturity, however, developed only slight or minimal storage scald symptom after 7 months of storage in 1 and 0.5% O2 with 0.05% CO2. A high incidence of low-O2 injury (i.e., ribbon-like, depressed skin browning) was found in fruit from Oregon stored for 9 months in 0.5% O2 (with or without CO2) and in 1.0% to 1.5% O2 with <0.03% CO2. No low-02 injury was found in fruit from Washington or British Columbia after low-O2 storage.

Open Access