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  • Author or Editor: K. Kobayashi x
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Abstract

Summer-sprouting in Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum) occurred more frequently in scale-propagated plantlets than in yearling planting stock. Cultivars without summer-sprouting in scale-propagated plantlets had no summer-sprouting in yearling planting stock. Cultivars having high percentages of summer-sprouting in scale-propagated plantlets also had high percentages of summer-sprouting in yearling planting stock.

Open Access

Abstract

Ethylene and ethane production and electrolyte leakage were determined during water stress of leaves of asceptically-cultured plum (Prunus insititia L. cv. Pixy). Ethylene production increased to a maximum at about 50% leaf water loss and decreased as water deficit increased. Ethane production and electrolyte leakage were highly correlated, increasing only after 50% water loss to a maximum at about 72% water loss, indicating an increase in cell injury and death.

Open Access

Curricula in the Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa were created and modified in the last few years to educate students on topics related to environmental sustainability. New programs included an Organic Food Crop Production course and the Sustainable and Organic Farm Training program. The courses Tropical Production Systems, Vegetable Crop Production, and Weed Science were modified to incorporate concepts of environmental sustainability. The new curricula and modified courses were designed to actively engage students and to promote self-learning through in-depth coverage of sustainable horticultural theory, a hands-on practicum, farm visits, and cocurricular activities. Students were exposed to a broad range of topics, including agroecology, urban agriculture, organic food production, marketing, aquaponics, and landscape ecology from a unique tropical perspective.

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Reducing grower reliance on off-island inputs to promote plant nutrition was identified by industry as a high priority in efforts to improve agricultural sustainability in Hawai’i. A variety of knowledge gaps exist that prevent producers from using locally produced amendments in the fertility program. This study will focus on recent transdisciplinary efforts at the University of Hawai’i to improve understanding of factors that affect variability in the quality, application, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of locally produced composts, vermicomposts, rendered animal products, and algae in Hawai’i. A series of greenhouse, experiment station, and on-farm trials have supported several conclusions, including 1) aqueous extracts of vermicomposts and high-quality, farmer-produced thermophilic composts can effectively improve crop growth and reduce costs associated with the use of these inputs; 2) replacement of peat and other imports with local materials in vegetable seedling production have the potential to improve seedling vigor and reduce costs in the long term; 3) commercially produced rendered meat products, alone and in combination with commercial composts, are a valuable local source of nitrogen (N); and 4) invasive algae from coral reef remediation may provide a significant source of potassium (K) in the near term, but K content of algae is highly dependent on species and location of growth.

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