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  • Author or Editor: Judy Caldwell x
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Two xeriscape gardens have been designed for the purpose of educating the public about the importance of water conservation through xeriscaping. One was designed and implemented for a temporary exhibit at the South Carolina State Fair in October of 1991. The exhibit was cosponsored by the Clemson University Extension Service and Master Gardener programs.

The second garden has been designed for the Clemson University Botanical Garden. This will be a permanant addition to the botanical garden soley for display purposes. It is designed to be a model for students, professors, and the general public to observe and study principles associated with water conservation in the landscape.

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The City of Clemson, South Carolina recently received funding from America the Beautiful to develop a community/government/educational partnership. The purpose of this project was to promote tree planting initiatives and awareness for future generations as well as to enhance our city and its roadsides. The project involved completing a tree inventory and landscape design for Highway 123, a major highway into Clemson. Presentations were made to city officials and approvals obtained by the highway department before implementation took place. Over 100 trees were planted and an educational pamphlet was published to illustrate the streetscape project and to serve as a guide for city officials. My presentation outlines the goals, methodology and results of this project.

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Two xeriscape gardens have been designed for the purpose of educating the public about the importance of water conservation through xeriscaping. One was designed and implemented for a temporary exhibit at the South Carolina State Fair in October of 1991. The exhibit was cosponsored by the Clemson University Extension Service and Master Gardener programs.

The second garden has been designed for the Clemson University Botanical Garden. This will be a permanant addition to the botanical garden soley for display purposes. It is designed to be a model for students, professors, and the general public to observe and study principles associated with water conservation in the landscape.

Free access

The City of Clemson, South Carolina recently received funding from America the Beautiful to develop a community/government/educational partnership. The purpose of this project was to promote tree planting initiatives and awareness for future generations as well as to enhance our city and its roadsides. The project involved completing a tree inventory and landscape design for Highway 123, a major highway into Clemson. Presentations were made to city officials and approvals obtained by the highway department before implementation took place. Over 100 trees were planted and an educational pamphlet was published to illustrate the streetscape project and to serve as a guide for city officials. My presentation outlines the goals, methodology and results of this project.

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A program called “Writing Across the Curriculum” has been initiated in many universities across the nation. In response to this initiative, the Horticulture Department at Clemson University is promoting writing in all areas of study. As part of this effort, an independent study was conducted to produce an educational booklet providing an account of a major landscape project. The project involved a tree inventory, landscape designs, and tree plantings along Highway 123. This interdisciplinary effort was completed by the City of Clemson and Clemson University's Horticulture 308 Landscape Design class with funding from America the Beautiful.

Included in the booklet are student articles, concepts, and designs, as well as an account of the process they followed. Layout was completed on the Macintosh IIsi with Pagemaker software.

The South Carolina Forestry Commission is publishing the booklet, which will be used by local officials as they implement future phases of the project. It will also be distributed to communities throughout the South to be used as an educational tool, showing the process our city followed in enhancing our urban tree cover.

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Landscape trees are frequently planted with their root collars below grade, and it has been suggested that such deep planting predisposes trees to transplant failure and girdling root formation. The objective of the present research was to examine the effect of planting depth on the health, survival, and root development of two popular landscape trees, red maple (Acer rubrum) and `Yoshino' cherry (Prunus ×yedoensis). Trees were transplanted with their root flares at grade, 15 cm below grade or 31 cm below grade. Deep planting had a strong negative effect on the short-term survival of `Yoshino' cherries. Two years posttransplant, 50% of the 15-cm- and 31-cm-deep planted cherries had died, whereas all the control cherries had survived (P< 0.001; 2). Short-term survival of maples was not affected by planting depth. Deep-planted trees of both species exhibited little fine root regrowth into the upper soil layers during the first year after transplant. Four years posttransplant, control maples had 14% ± 19% of their trunk circumference encircled by girdling or potentially-girdling roots; this number rose to 48% ± 29% and 71% ± 21% for 15-cm- and 31-cm-deep planted maples, respectively (P< 0.01; ANOVA main effect). There were no treatment-related differences in girdling root development in the cherries.

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