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  • Author or Editor: Juan A. Izquierdo x
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Abstract

Seedlings of bean, (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), were separated into scions and rootstocks using a V-shaped razor blade secured in a cutting block and mounted on a pair of electrician's pliers. Precise cuts could be made rapidly and easily, and the use of a hair clip eliminated the need for wrapping and unwrapping the graft. Grafted plants were transplanted in the greenhouse and to the field with a high degree of success. Components of seed yield, plant weight, and harvest index (ratio of seed weight to dry weight of aerial portion of plant) were affected by grafting on either the same strain or other strains used as rootstocks.

Open Access

Abstract

I wish to point out a discrepancy in the conclusion on the value of the J-14 hydraulic press by A.H. Markhart, III, and B. Smit-Spinks [HortScience 19(l):52–54, Feb. 1984] that the J-14 readings prevent reliable predictions of the Scholander pressure bomb for leaf water potential measurements.

Open Access

Abstract

We compared 9 dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) strains characterized by the following architectures for seed filling, yield, and components of yield: small bush, tall erect bush, classic II, and architype. Small and tall erect bush are determinate in growth habit; classic II is indeterminate and produces a short vine. Architype is erect, contains 2–4 branches angled acutely upward, grows to about 75 cm, terminates in a short vine, and does not lodge at maturity. Seed dry weight vs. days after 50% flowering data were fit to a cubic polynomial to calculate the rate and duration of seed filling. Small bush produced the greatest pods/m2 of the groups, but pod set was offset by a high percentage of shriveling and seed abortion. The architype outyielded the tall erect and small bush groups by 34 and 45 %, respectively, which was due to a greater number of seeds/pod, seeds/m2, and heavier seeds. The heavy seeds of the architype compared to the bush appeared to be due to a longer filling duration, because linear seed filling rates were similar. The architype filling duration was 11.3 days compared to 5.7 and 7.0 days for small and tall erect bush, respectively. The longer architype filling duration may be associated with its ability to prolong the duration of photosynthesis. The 17% yield increase of the architype over classic II was due to improved lodging resistance through a modification of the morphology by reducing branches and narrowing the plant canopy.

Open Access