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Michael B. Thomas, Jonathan H. Crane, James J. Ferguson, Howard W. Beck and Joseph W. Noling

The TFRUIT·Xpert and CIT·Xpert computerbased diagnostic programs can quickly assist commercial producers, extension agents, and homeowners in the diagnosis of diseases, insect pest problems and physiological disorders. The CIT·Xpert system focuses on citrus (Citrus spp.), whereas the TFRUIT·Xpert system focuses on avocado (Persea americana Mill.), carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.), lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.), mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.), and `Tahiti' lime (Citrus latifolia Tan.). The systems were developed in cooperation with research and extension specialists with expertise in the area of diagnosing diseases, disorders, and pest problems of citrus and tropical fruit. The systems' methodology reproduces the diagnostic reasoning process of these experts. Reviews of extension and research literature and 35-mm color slide images were completed to obtain representative information and slide images illustrative of diseases, disorders, and pest problems specific to Florida. The diagnostic programs operate under Microsoft-Windows. Full-screen color images are linked to symptoms (87 for CIT·Xpert and 167 for TFRUIT·Xpert) of diseases, disorders, and insect pest problems of citrus and tropical fruit, respectively. Users can also refer to summary documents and retrieve management information from the Univ. of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences extension publications through hypertext links. The programs are available separately on CD-ROM and each contains over 150 digital color images of symptoms.

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Camille E. Esmel, Bielinski M. Santos, Eric H. Simonne, Jack E. Rechcigl and Joseph W. Noling

A renewed interest in sulfur (S) deficiency has occurred because of reductions in atmospheric depositions of S caused by implementation of clean air regulations around the world. In vegetable production systems, other sources of S exist, such as soil S, fertilizers, and irrigation water. While soil testing and fertilizer labels impart information on quantity of S, it is unknown how much S within the irrigation water contributes to the total crop requirement. Two studies were conducted to determine the influence of elemental S fertilization rates and irrigation programs on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) growth and yield. Irrigation volumes were 3528, 5292, and 7056 gal/acre per day and preplant S rates were 0, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 lb/acre. Data showed that neither plant height, leaf greenness, soil pH nor total soil S content was consistently affected by preplant S rates. During both seasons, early marketable fruit weight increased sharply when plots were treated with at least 25 lb/acre of preplant S in comparison with the nontreated control. Early fruit weight of extralarge and all marketable grades increased by 1.5 and 1.7 tons/acre, respectively, with the application of 25 lb/acre of S. There were no early fruit weight differences, regardless of marketable fruit grade, among preplant S rates from 25 to 200 lb/acre. Based upon this result, adding preplant S to the fertilization programs in sandy soils improves tomato yield and fall within the current recommended application range of S (30 lb/acre) for vegetables in Florida. At the same time, irrigation volumes did not consistently influence soil S concentration, soil pH, leaf S concentrations or tomato yield, which suggested that irrigation water with levels of S similar to this location [58 mg·L−1 of sulfate (SO4) or 19 mg·L−1 of S] may not meet tomato S requirement during a short cropping seasons of 12 weeks, possibly because microbes need longer periods of time to oxidize the current S species in the water to the absorbed SO4 form.

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James P. Gilreath, Timothy N. Motis, Bielinski M. Santos, Joseph W. Noling, Salvadore J. Locascio and Daniel O. Chellemi

Field studies were conducted during four consecutive tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) -cucumber (Cucumis sativus) rotations to examine the longterm residual effects of tomato methyl bromide (MBr) alternatives on soilborne pests in double-cropped cucumber. Four treatments were established in tomato fields: a) nontreated control; b) MBr + chloropicrin (Pic) (67:33 by weight) at a rate of 350 lb/acre; c) tank-mixed pebulate + napropamide at 4 and 2 lb/acre, respectively, followed by 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) + Pic (83:17 by volume) at 40 gal/acre; and d) napropamide at 2 lb/acre followed by soil solarization for 7 to 8 weeks. Each of the following seasons, cucumber was planted in the same tomato plots without removing mulch films. For nutsedge [purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) and yellow nutsedge (C. esculentus)] densities, napropamide followed by solarization plots had equal control (≤15 plants/m2) as MBr + Pic during all four cropping seasons. However, nematode control with solarization was inconsistent. Marketable yield data proved that fumigation in tomato fields with either MBr + Pic or pebulate + napropamide followed by 1,3-D + Pic had a long-term effect on double-cropped cucumber.

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James P. Gilreath, Bielinski M. Santos, Joseph W. Noling, Salvadore J. Locascio, Donald W. Dickson, Erin N. Rosskopf and Steven M. Olson

Field studies were conducted in three Florida locations (Bradenton, Gainesville, and Quincy) during 1998-99 and 1999-2000 to: 1) compare the performance of two transplant systems under diverse MBr alternative programs in `Chandler' strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), and 2) determine the efficacy of these treatments on soilborne pest control in strawberry. Fumigant treatments were: 1) nonfumigated control, 2) methyl bromide plus chloropicrin (MBr + Pic) at a rate of 350 lb/acre, 3) Pic at 300 lb/acre and napropamide at 4 lb/acre, 4) 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) plus Pic at 35 gal/acre and napropamide at 4 lb/acre, 5) metam sodium (MNa) at 60 gal/acre and napropamide at 4 lb/acre, and 6) MNa followed by 1,3-D at 60 and 12 gal/acre and napropamide at 4 lb/acre, respectively. Strawberry transplants were either bare-root or containerized plugs. There were no significant fumigant by transplant type interactions for strawberry plant vigor and root weight per plant, whereas ring nematode (Criconema spp.) and nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus and C. esculentus) populations, and total marketable fruit weight were only infl uenced by fumigant application. The nonfumigated plots had the lowest strawberry plant vigor and root weight per plant in all three locations. In most cases, plant vigor and root biomass per plant increased as a response to any fumigant application. With regard to the transplant type, bare-root transplants had similar plant vigor as plugs in two of the three locations. Fumigation improved nutsedge and ring nematode control. All fumigants had higher early and total marketable yield than the nonfumigated control, whereas transplant type had no effect on total fruit weight.