Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jose Pablo Morales-Payan x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jose Pablo Morales-Payan

Flowering plants of `Kapoho' papaya were sprayed with aqueous solutions of kinetin and folcysteine. Plants were treated four times at 3-week intervals with 0-, 50-, 90-, or 130-ppm solutions of either biostimulant or their combinations. Fruit number, size, and weight were recorded weekly during 15 weeks after treatment. Folcysteine treatment at 90 to 130 ppm significantly increased `Kapoho' papaya yield. Kinetin treatment alone did not significantly affect fruit yield at any rate tested. Moreover, none of the kinetin plus folcysteine combinations significantly differed from the control in terms of fruit yield. These findings suggest that folcysteine rates of 90 to 130 ppm can increase fruit yield in this cultivar, and that kinetin had an antagonistic effect on the activity of folcysteine on the yield of `Kapoho' papaya.

Free access

Jose Pablo Morales-Payan

Field experiments were conducted in the Dominican Republic to determine the effects of different rates of the biostimulants folcysteine and kinetin on fruit yield of `Sunrise' papaya. Aqueous solutions of either 50, 70, 90, 110, or 130 ppm. Four applications were made at 3-week intervals. Fruit number, size, and weight were recorded weekly during 15 weeks after application. Yields for the control and kinetin-treated plants were not significantly different. Significant yield increase was found in plants treated with 70 and 90 ppm of folcysteine solution. Fruit yield in plants treated with 30, 50, 110, or 130 ppm of folcysteine did not differ significantly from that of the control. These results indicate that folcysteine treatment at 70 and 90 ppm at flowering can significantly increase fruit yield in `Sunrise' papaya.

Free access

Bielinski M. Santos and Jose Pablo Morales-Payan

Greenhouse experiments were carried out to determine the tolerance of two radish cultivars to soil-applied B, Mo, and Zn. Sources used were boric acid (0, 54, 108, 216, 324, and 432 ppm), molybdic acid (0, 1.4, 2.8, 5.6, 8.5, and 11.3 ppm), and zinc sulfate (0, 40, 80, 160, 240, and 360 ppm) applied at planting in addition to the control. Plants were grown in plastic containers of 1.5 L, filled with a potting medium composed of 50% vermiculite, 30% sphagnum peat, and 20% perlite. Treatments were arranged within a randomized complete block design with six replications. Fresh weight of commercial roots was not affected by Mo or Zn applications in either cultivar. However, B applications decreased root fresh weight as rate increased. These results suggest that these radish cultivars perform well in a relatively wide range of Mo and Zn application rates, whereas tolerance to B appears to be low.

Free access

Jose Pablo Morales-Payan and Bielinski M. Santos

Field experiments were conducted in the Dominican Republic to determine the effect of combinations of N with folcysteine and gibberellic acid 3 on cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) yield. Nitrogen levels (0, 36, 55, 73, 91 kg·ha–1) in soil application at sowing were combined with foliar spray of the biostimulant folcysteine or gibberellic acid (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 ppm) 15 days after emergence. Treatments were applied in a factorial arrangement on a randomized complete block design with three replications. Fresh weight of the aerial part of the plants was determined 40 days after emergence. No significant difference was found due to folcysteine treatment. Nitrogen had a significant effect, with optimal yield at 55 kg·ha–1. Significant interaction was detected for the combinations of gibberellic acid and N, with yield increasing as the rate of the two factors increased.

Free access

Alyssa H. Cho, Carlene A. Chase, Danielle D. Treadwell, Rosalie L. Koenig, John Bradley Morris and Jose Pablo Morales-Payan

A field study was conducted in 2008 and 2009 in Citra, FL, to evaluate the effects of seeding rate and removal of apical dominance of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) on weed suppression and seed production by sunn hemp. Three seeding rates of sunn hemp were used: a representative seed production rate of 11 kg·ha−1, an intermediate seeding rate of 28 kg·ha−1, and a cover crop seeding rate of 45 kg·ha−1. Cutting the main stem at 3, 4, or 5 weeks after planting to break apical dominance was compared with an uncut treatment. Cutting had no significant effect on shoot biomass, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) penetrating the canopy, and nondestructive leaf area index (LAI). As a result, cutting also had no effect on weed density and biomass in 2008 and very little effect in 2009. Increase in seeding rate resulted in linear decrease in PAR and increase in LAI in both years. Seeding rate had a greater effect on suppression of weed biomass than on suppression of weed density. There was a linear decline in sunn hemp branching with increased seeding rate in 2009 and, averaged across years, flower number decreased linearly with increased seeding rate. Cutting to break apical dominance induced branching but had no effect on flower number. No seed pod production occurred and we postulate that the lack of seed production may be the result of the absence of effective pollinators in fall when short-day varieties of sunn hemp flower in Florida.