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  • Author or Editor: Jonathan D. Phillips x
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Three intercept surveys were conducted at the Penn State Southeast Research and Extension Center in Landisville, Pa., at three separate field days during the period of 28 July 2004 to 4 Aug. 2004 to determine grower (n = 78), retailer (n = 52), and consumer (n = 55) preference for annual planters. Survey participants were self-selected and asked to answer questions evaluating both their preference for and past experience with purchasing annual planters, as well as sociographic and demographic questions. Growers who were 45 years of age or younger were more likely to take price into consideration when creating an annual planter (68.8%) than those who were 46 years of age or older (43.3%), but less likely to use point-of-purchase material to educate consumers on proper container care (45.2% and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, retailers whose business was 89% retail or less were less likely to consider price when creating annual planters (53.3%) than those participants whose business was 90% retail or greater (84.2%), and were also found to be less likely to use point-of-purchase material to educate consumers on proper container care (46.7% and 72.2%, respectively). Consumers were more likely to consider price when purchasing an annual planter if they were female (92.7%) than if they were male (66.7%). Consumer participants who resided in single-family homes were more likely to take the color combination into consideration when purchasing annual planters (100.0%) than those who live in another form of housing (e.g., apartment or mobile home; 66.7%). Additionally, consumers who live in single-adult households were less likely to consider color combination when purchasing an annual planter (88.9%) than those who live in households with two or more adults (100.0%).

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