Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 71 items for

  • Author or Editor: John Ruter x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

A study was conducted with Coreopsis verticillata L. `Moonbeam' and Plumbago auriculata Lam. to evaluate the growth of these perennial plants in 2.6-liter (#1) black plastic containers (BPCs) compared to plants grown in fiber containers with Cu(OH)2 (FCs+) impregnated into the container walls. Coreopsis root and shoot dry weight was unaffected by container type, whereas Plumbago root and shoot dry weight was greater (2.2× and 1.6×, respectively) for plants grown in FCs+ compared to BPCs. The root : shoot ratio of Plumbago increased 30% when plants were grown in FCs+ compared to BPCs. Root circling was effectively controlled for both species grown in the FCs+. FCs remained in salable condition for the duration of the study. In contrast to untreated FCs, FCs+ will have to be removed at transplanting to allow for normal root development.

Full access
Author:

Paclobutrazol was applied as a foliar spray, root-medium drench, and impregnated spike to `New Gold' lantana grown in 2.8-liter pots. Plants were treated 14 June 1993 at rates of 0, 0.5, and 1.0 mg a.i. paclobutrazol/pot and were harvested 27 July 1993 when control plants required further pruning. Impregnated spikes reduced plant size and flowering to a greater degree than spray applications. Drenches reduced root dry weight and biomass compared to spray applications. Plants treated with 0.5 and 1.0 mg a.i. paclobutrazol/pot were not different in regards to plant growth and flowering. Compared to nontreated controls, plants treated with paclobutrazol had a reduced growth index, decreased shoot and root dry weight, and fewer flowers with open florets. All plants in the study were marketable, even though growth control was considered excessive. Lower rates than used in this study should be considered for controlling growth. These results suggest that impregnated spike formulations of paclobutrazol may control plant growth in pine bark-based media.

Full access
Author:

Mouse ear disorder on container-grown river birch (Betulanigra L.) is a national problem caused by a deficiency of nickel. Symptomatic plants have leaves which are small, wrinkled, darker green, cupped, and have necrotic margins. Research showed that mouse ear could be cured by applications of nickel sulfate (Ruter, 2004). Further research was needed to determine optimal rates of application for sprays and drenches and to determine if phytotoxicity occurs at high rates. A study was initiated at a nursery in South Georgia on 25 June 2003, using river birch in their second growing season in #15 containers. Plants were selected for uniformity of mouse ear disorder. Treatments included a control, urea (0.24 g·L-1) + surfactant (1.0 mL·L-1), 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mg·L-1 nickel sulfate sprays, and substrate drenches applied at 150 and 300 mg of Ni/pot. After 30 days, all plants treated with nickel sulfate had 100% normal growth, except the 150 mg of Ni/pot drench, which had 79% of the canopy showing normal growth. No phytotoxicity was noted. Plants receiving foliar sprays had a 66% to 72% increase in leaf area, a 64% to 68% increase in leaf dry mass, a 31% to 44% increase in stem length, and a 9% to 17% increase in specific leaf area compared to nontreated plants. Drench treatments increased leaf area up to 62%, leaf dry mass to 55% and stem length up to 29% over control plants. Nickel in the foliage of nontreated plants was 2.3 mg·kg-1. For the spray treatments, foliar Ni ranged from 5.5 mg·kg-1 for the 250 mg·L-1 treatment to 9.3 mg·kg-1 for the 1000 mg·L-1 treatment. Though plants at the high rate of drench treatment resumed normal growth, foliar Ni levels were not different from control plants. In general, if plants were treated with Ni, then foliar B, Fe, and Zn decreased.

Free access
Author:

Loropetalum chinensevar.rubrum, Chinese fringe-flower, was introduced into the United States in 1989 and quickly became on of the most popular plants in the nursery trade. Growth abnormalities (little-leaf disorder) became a problem on container-grown plants in pine bark substrates during the late 1990s. Symptoms are as follows: darkening of older growth, shortening of internodes, upward cupping of leaves, crinkling of new growth, particularly the distal part of the leaf, decrease in leaf size. In severe cases leaf necrosis occurs along with stem elongation, thus branches appear to be elongating without new leaves. Petioles become very short. Branchlets may also be reflexed or drooping. In Florida, an eriophyid mite has been touted as the causal agent for the disorder. On plants sampled from Georgia nurseries, eriophyid mites have never been detected. `Ruby' consistently has the problem, while it has also been noted on `Sizzling Pink' and `Suzanne'. Plants in the ground do not express the problem. There may be an element present in native soil that is not supplied in sufficient quantity in organic substrates. Foliage from a commercial nursery was sampled for micronutrients concentrations. Initial data indicated that copper, zinc, and nickel were low and could be causing the problem. In May 2005, a study was initiated at a commercial nursery in Grady County, Ga. Copper and zinc sulfate, along with nickel lignonsulfonate, was applied as foliar sprays to symptomatic plants of `Suzanne' growing in #5 containers. Within two weeks after treatment, plants sprayed with copper sulfate resumed normal growth. Control plants, or plants treated with zinc or nickel did not resume normal growth. A second study was initiated in June to evaluate different rates of copper sulfate and Kocide, a copper fungicide. Medium to high rates of copper sulfate and the high label rate of Kocide were effective. The plants in this study had severe symptoms and required repeat applications of copper. Further research is needed on appropriate formulations of copper, rates of application, and rates of incorporation into pine bark substrates to eliminate the problem.

Free access
Author:

Membrane thermostability of Heritage river birch (Betula nigra L. Heritage) was measured by electrolyte leakage from excised roots of plants grown in pot-in-pot (PIP) and conventional aboveground production systems (CPS). The predicted critical midpoint temperature (Tm) for a 30-min exposure was 54.6 ± 0.2 °C for PIP and 56.2 ± 0.6 °C for CPS plants. Plants grown PIP had a steeper slope through the predicted Tm, suggesting a decreased tolerance to high root-zone temperatures in relation to plants grown aboveground. Since the root systems of Heritage river birch grown PIP are damaged at lower temperatures than plants grown aboveground, growers should prevent exposure of root systems to high temperatures during postproduction handling of plants grown PIP.

Free access
Author:

A study was conducted with Prunus × incamp `Okame' to evaluate the effects of a pot-in-pot production system compared to a conventional above-ground system and cyclic irrigation on plant growth and water loss. Plants were grown in #7 (26-L) containers with a 8:1 pinebark:sand (v/v) substrate. Cyclic irrigation provided the same total volume of water, but was applied one, three, or four times per day. Final plant height and stem diameter, shoot and root dry weight, total biomass, and root:shoot ratio were all increased for plants grown pot-in-pot compared to above-ground. Multiple irrigation cycles increased stem diameter, shoot dry weight, and total biomass, compared to a single irrigation application. Multiple irrigation cycles decreased the root:shoot ratio. Evapotranspiration was influenced by production system, irrigation, and date. Amount of water lost as leachate was influenced by irrigation and date. Cyclic irrigation resulted in a two-fold decrease in leachate volume. Soluble salts and nitrate-nitrogen in the leachate were influenced by an interaction between production system, irrigation, and date.

Free access
Author:

The long-term effects of paclobutrazol applied to container-grown `Mojave' pyracantha (Pyracantha ×) and `San Jose' juniper (Juniperus chinensis L.) were investigated. Paclobutrazol was applied as a drench to container-grown (2.8 liter) plants at the rates of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg a.i./pot in June 1991, and plants were transplanted to the field in Feb. 1992. Pyracantha plant height, shoot and root dry weight, and total biomass (shoot dry weight + root dry weight) decreased quadratically as rate of paclobutrazol increased during nursery production. Paclobutrazol had no effect on plant height or shoot dry weight of Juniperus, although width indices were reduced. Ratings for root quality for Juniperus in containers increased as rate of paclobutrazol increased. After 9 months in the landscape, paclobutrazol still influenced plant height, width, and shoot dry weight for Pyracantha but had no effect on Juniperus. As rate of application increased, fruit retention on Pyracantha increased. Paclobutrazol applied as a container medium drench at 5 mg a.i./pot was excessive during nursery production of Pyracantha and Juniperus. Chemical name used: [(2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-yl)penten-3-ol] (paclobutrazol).

Free access
Author:

Temperatures producing heat damage in leaves of Ilex ×meserveae S.Y. Hu `Blue Prince' and Ilex rugosa × cornuta Lindl. & Paxt. `Mesdob' (China Boy) were evaluated using electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques. Whole leaves were exposed to temperatures from 30 to 65C for 30 minutes to determine critical midpoint heat-killing temperatures (TJ using electrolyte leakage techniques. The Tm for `Blue Prince' and `Mesdob' was 52.4 ± 0.lC and 53.8 ± 0.lC, respectively. Dark-adapted leaves were heated for 30 minutes in darkness at temperatures between 30 and 57C before chlorophyll fluorescence was measured. Initial (F0) and peak fluorescence measurements were higher at 54 and 55C for `Mesdob' than for `Blue Prince'. Cultivar had no effect on variable fluorescence (F,). Based on the Fv: Fo ratio, `Mesdob' was estimated to have a higher optimal plant growth temperature than `Blue Prince'. The physiologic data support the hypothesis that I. cornuta as a parent conferred heat tolerance to the interspecific hybrid in this study.

Free access
Author:

Granular and liquid formulations of paclobutrazol were tested to evaluate the growth and flowering response of butterfly bush (Buddleia davidii Franch. 'Dubonnet'). At the rates tested (5, 10, 20, and 40 mg ai·pot–1), the granular formulation reduced the growth index, plant height, shoot dry weight, total plant biomass, number of panicles and panicle length to a greater degree than the liquid formulation applied as a drench. Both formulations reduced total plant biomass and increased the root:shoot ratio compared to the control. All rates of the granular formulation above 5 mg ai · pot–1 produced non-marketable plants. Since no phytotoxicity was observed with any treatment, the application of paclobutrazol to control the growth of butterfly-bush may be useful if the correct formulation and rate of application are chosen.

Free access