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John Masiunas

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John B. Masiunas

Experiments determined the effectiveness of the bipyridinium herbicides paraquat and diquat and of the diphenyl ether herbicide lactofen to desiccate onion (Allium cepa L.) shoots without affecting bulb quality and storage life. Paraquat, applied once, desiccated 80% of onion shoots within 3 days. Diquat desiccated ≈ 60% of onion shoots within 10 days of treatment. Lactofen caused slight necrosis but did not adequately desiccate onion shoots. Diquat and paraquat reduced sprouting of `Red Wethersfield' more than of `White Portugal'. Chemical names used: 6,7-dihydrodipyrido[l,2 2',1'-c] pyrazinediium ion (diquat); (±)2-ethoxy-l-methyl-2-oxoethy1 5-[2chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxyl] -2-nitrobenzoate (lactofen); 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium ion (paraquat).

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Vamsgita Kolasani and John Masiunas

Eastern black nightshade is one of the problematic weeds in vegetables and soybeans in the Midwest. It is representative of a rapidly growing complex of broadleaf weeds where herbicide resistance would be expected to occur. Eastern black nightshade calli lines that are resistant and susceptible to acifluorfen were maintained on the medium without the herbicide. After two years, these lines were tested for tolerance to acifluorfen and paraquat. Tolerance to acifluorfen was maintained in the previously selected lines. The lines were also cross tolerant to paraquat. Plants were regenerated from these calli lines and grown in the greenhouse. 14C-acifluorfen and 14C-paraquat uptake, translocation, and metabolism were studied.

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Chang-Yeon Yu and John Masiunas

The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal and genotypic variation in regenerated plants of Solarium and Lycopersicon. Calli of Lycopersicon peruvianum genotypes PI199380, PI126345, PI251301, and LA1373, along with Solanum ptycanthum were transferred onto media consisting of MS salts with Gamborg vitamins. The shoots formed were rooted in vitro and transferred to greenhouse soil. Actively growing root tips were harvested and pretreated, fixed, hydrolyses and stained. Pollen mother cells were fixed in propionic alcohol solution and stained with aceto-carmine. The number of chromosomes were counted. The greatest variation was in Solanum ptycanthum with chromosome numbers ranging from 18 to 60 (2n=24). Progeny analysis for 12 somaclones of Solarium ptycanthum was done by selfing for two generations. Morphology, shoot height, and weight were determined in each generation. The amount of variation differed among the somaclonal lines.

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Chang-Yeon Yu and John Masiunas

Friable callus of Solanum ptycanthum and L. peruvianum PI199380 clone 149 were subcultured on liquid Murashige and Skoog salts and Gamborg Vitamin medium with 2,4-D (1mg/l) until a fine suspension of cells was obtained. The suspension cultured cells were then plated on selection medium. Twenty-five acifluorfen-tolerant cell lines of Solanum ptycanthum and fourteen tolerant Lycopersicon peruvianum cell lines were obtained by a stepwise increase in concentration of acifluorfen. Acifluorfen-tolerant cell lines were transferred on to regeneration media with the herbicide. Shoot regeneration differed depending on the cell line and acifluorfen concentration, ranging from 0 to 37 plants per calli. As acifluorfen concentration increased in the regeneration media, the number of shoots and shoot height decreased. There was a wide range of variation in shoot morphology, which depended on the cell line.

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Chang-Yeon Yu and John Masiunas

Repeated callus sub-culture reduce the regeneration capacity in many species. Our studies determined the effect of genotype and medium on regeneration of several Solanum and Lycopersicon genotypes from long-term callus cultures. In the first study, 13 genotypes were transferred to regeneration medium, including: Murashige and Skoog plus Gamborg Vitamins (MG); Murashige and Skoog (MS); Gamborg (GM); and white (WM). The greatest shoot regeneration was on the MG medium, containing the highest levels of thiamine. Shoot differentiation was greatest with 0.2 mg/l IAA and 2 mg/l BA. No plants were regenerated on GM or WM medium. In a second study, the effect of thiamine (0 to 200 mg/l) on shoot regeneration of the L. peruvianum genotypes PI199380, PI126945, PI251301, and PI128652, along with Solanum ptycanthum, Solanum nigrum, and L. esculentum `Diego' was evaluated. Shoot regeneration of Solanum ptycanthum, Solanum nigrum, L. peruvianum PI 199380 and PI25301 was best with 20 mg/l of thiamine.

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Michael P. Croster and John B. Masiunas

Studies established the critical period for eastern black nightshade (nightshade) (Solanum ptycanthum Dun.) competition in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and determined the effect of N fertility on pea and nightshade growth. In 1992, pea yields were most affected when nightshade was established at planting and remained for 4 or 6 weeks, while in 1993, competition for 6 weeks caused the greatest reduction in pea yields. In a sand culture study, pea biomass and N content were not affected by three N levels (2.1, 21, and 210 mg·L-1). Nightshade plants were five to six times larger in the highest N treatment than at lower N levels. Nitrogen content of nightshade was 0.76% at 2.1 ppm N and 3.22% at 210 ppm N. Choosing soils with low N levels or reducing the N rates used in pea may decrease nightshade interference and berry contamination of pea.

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Jacqueline A. Ricotta and John B. Masiunas

Black polyethylene mulch and weed control strategies were evaluated for potential use by small acreage herb producers. In both 1988 and 1989, the mulch greatly increased fresh and dry weight yields of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.). Parsley (Petroselinum crispum Nym.) yield did not respond to the mulch. Preplant application of napropamide provided weed control for 2 weeks, but was subsequently not effective on a heavy infestation of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.). Hand-hoed and glyphosate-treated plots (both with and without plastic) produced equivalent yields. Chemical names used: N, N -diethyl-2(1-napthalenoxy)-propanamide (napropamide); N- (phosphonomethyl) glycine (glyphosate).

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Elizabeth A. Wahle and John B. Masiunas

Two experiments were conducted to evaluate processing pumpkin and processing squash tolerance to preemergence herbicides. The experiments were randomized complete block designs with three or four replications. The herbicides were applied after seeding the crop using a CO2-pressurized sprayer delivering 233 L/ha. We evaluated clomazone alone, and in combination with either halosulfuron or sulfentrazone. The first experiment was conducted in Morton, Ill., using `Libby's Select' processing pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata). None of the treatments caused any significant pumpkin phytotoxicity. On 7 July all treatments reduced the number of grass weeds compared to the untreated control. There were no differences in grass control between the herbicide treatments. Broadleaf control was best in sulfentrazone at 0.56 kg/ha or clomazone + halosulfuron at 0.56 + 0.13 kg/ha and worst in the untreated control. Weed control decreased by the 29 July rating; grass and broadleaf weed control was unacceptable in all treatments due to infestation with perennial weeds. Sulfentrazone alone or with clomazone was safe for use on pumpkins in heavier soils. The second experiment, conducted in Champaign, Ill., used `NK530' processing squash (Cucurbita maxima). None of the treatments caused any squash phytotoxicity. The best control on 14 July was with combinations of clomazone and sulfentrazone. On 10 Aug., all herbicide treatments were similar in their control of broadleaf weeds. Sulfentrazone and halosulfuron do not injure processing pumpkin or squash when applied either alone or in combination with clomazone.