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  • Author or Editor: John M. Wells x
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Abstract

Postharvest decay and weight loss of peaches (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) coated with a nonemulsified, water-insoluble blend of mineral oil, petrolatum, and paraffin (wax) containing 5000 ppm Botran and 2500 ppm benomyl was unaffected by subsequent hydrocooling. Botran residues on peaches waxed and hydrocooled under experimental conditions averaged 2.8 ppm, significantly less than those on peaches that were waxed but not hydro-cooled (4.2 ppm). Under commercial conditions, however, Botran residues were slightly less (2.1 to 2.2 ppm) but not significantly different than those on unhydrocooled fruit (2.5 ppm). Therefore weight loss and decay of peaches can be controlled if a nonemulsified wax containing adequate fungicide is applied prior to hydrocooling.

Open Access

Abstract

Hand thinning during late June drop increased fruit size and improved quality of ‘Stanley’ plum as indexed by soluble solids and color development. Crop load within the range of 200 to 990 g of mature fruit per cm2 trunk cross-sectional area was negatively correlated with fruit size, soluble solids and color. The percentage of mature fruits with cheek diameter less than 35 mm increased as crop load increased. Total flower buds and flowers per spur, and flowers per flower bud, were not significantly affected by fruit load in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 fruits per spur the previous season. However, a weak negative relationship was found between fruits per spur and flower buds produced per spur with a wider range (0 to 8 fruits/spur) in fruit load.

Open Access

Abstract

Cantaloupes treated with 135° F water for 15, 30, or 60 seconds had significantly less stem-scar mold and surface mold than melons treated with 71° water (wet check). A 30-sec immersion controlled stem-scar mold slightly better than a 15-sec immersion. The addition of 600 ppm captan to the water at 135° significantly reduced stem-scar mold and surface mold compared to the hot-water treatment alone. Alternaria, Fusarium, and Rhizopus spp. were the fungi most frequently associated with these infections. Quality was evaluated after holding the melons for 7 days at 46° plus an additional 3 days at 72°.

In 3 of the 6 tests, the hot-water treatments significantly increased suture browning of the melons compared to the wet check. The fungicide did not influence suture browning.

General appearance of the melons treated at 130°, 135° or 145° was significantly better than that of the wet check (71°) melons, because of mold control by the hot water.

Open Access

Abstract

A new technique, termed hydraircooling, was evaluated for precooling fruit of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) packed in DU-ALL or similar type containers. Cooling rate was determined with respect to air and waterflow. Waterflow rates of 3.63 and 5.44 ml/minute were tested at each of 4 airflow rates (1070, 2140, 3210 and 4280 ml/second). Half-cooling times, with respect to airflow, ranged from 0.460 to 0.348 hour on top and 0.672 to 0.451 hour on the bottom of the container at 3.63 ml/minute waterflow. At the 5.44 ml/minute waterflow, respective half-cooling times ranged from 0.470 to 0.328 hour on top and 0.511 to 0.249 hour on the bottom. The peaches in these tests were 6.35 cm in diameter. In tests to compare hydraircooling with forced-air precooling, using 7 cm diameter peaches, respective half-cooling times were 0.433 hour compared to 0.516 hour on top and 0.523 hour compared to 0.731 hour on the bottom at an airflow of 2140 ml/second and a waterflow in the hydraircooler of 3.63 ml/minute. Cooling rate increased in relation to air and waterflow with the greater significance being obtained in relation to waterflow.

Open Access