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  • Author or Editor: John M. Labavitch x
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Discs from outer pericarp of mature green (MG) and light red (LR) tomatoes were incubated with 13C6-glucose as precursor to cell wall constituents, to determine biosynthetic capacity of the outer 2mm (including cuticle) and adjacent inner 2mm of tissue. Cell wall material was fractionated into pectic and hemicellulosic classes by sequential extraction, and alditol acetates and partially-methylated alditol acetates were prepared. Neutral sugars (NS), glycosidic linkage compositions and incorporation of label were determined by GC-FID and GC-MS. Rhamnose, arabinose and galactose accounted for ca. 90% of both labeled and total NS in the pectic fractions (sugar ratios within ripeness stage were the same for labeled and total NS). Xylose and glucose accounted for ca. 70% of both labeled and total NS in the hemicellulosic fraction (sugar ratios within ripeness stage were different between labeled and total NS). In the crude cell wall, galactose and glucose contents were significantly higher in the inner than in outer tissues for both MG and LR tomatoes. Loss of galactose during ripening was higher from outer tissues. These results show compositional differences between inner and outer tissues, and suggest that ripening-related wall synthesis may give rise to pectic polymers similar in NS composition to existing polysaccharides, and hemicellulosic polymers which may differ in composition.

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Acid hydrolysis-generated pectic oligomers have been shown to affect ripening of tomato fruit by inducing both acceleration of reddening and increased ethylene biosynthesis (Campbell & Labavitch, 1991 Plant Physiol 97:706-713). In the present work, homogeneous size classes of these oligomers were demonstrated to have different impacts on ethylene production of tomato fruit pericarp discs. Endogenous oligomeric material of the same size classes was isolated from ripening tomato tissues and also tested for biological activity. They promoted some aspects of ripening as shown by increased ACC and ethylene production, which suggests that pectic oligomers are potential regulators of the ripening process in tomatoes. A metabolic origin for these oligomers is suggested by the fact that they are produced by in vitro polygalacturonase I treatment of polygalacturonic acid or tomato pectin.

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Abstract

A method was devised for quantitation of methylated indoleacetic (MeIAA) using a nitrogen-phosphorus (N-P) detector gas chromatograph with sensitivity greater than 5 pg MeIAA. Parameters are described for use conditions of the N-P detector.

Open Access

Abstract

A gas chromatograph equipped with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector was used for quantitation of cytokinins. The described system, utilizing permethylated derivatives, will detect as little as 0.1 pg adenine, isopentenyl adenine, benzylamino purine, and kinetin, and 10 pg zeatin. As with all highly sensitive instrumentation, scrupulous procedures for sample preparation are essential.

Open Access

Commercially grown Granny Smith apples were stored at 0°C in air or 1% O2, and 2 sets of samples were taken every 4 weeks over a 28 week period. One set was immediately analysed for weight loss, firmness, color, soluble solids, pH and titratable acidity. Alcohol-insoluble substances were analysed for starch, water-soluble uronides, water-insoluble uronides, cellulose and neutral sugars. The second set of samples was kept in air at 20°C for an additional week, during which respiration and ethylene production rates were measured, prior to the above analyses. Storage in 1% O2 led to the improved maintenance of firmness, reduced respiration and ethylene production rates in ambient air, and a reduced content of water-soluble uronides, suggesting a reduced degree of hydrolysis. The correlation between firmness and water-soluble uronide content was not very strong. The predominant neutral sugars present in the wall were arabinose and galactose, and activities of putative hydrolyses that may be involved in the metabolism of polymers containing these sugars will be discussed.

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Commercially grown Granny Smith apples were stored at 0°C in air or 1% O2, and 2 sets of samples were taken every 4 weeks over a 28 week period. One set was immediately analysed for weight loss, firmness, color, soluble solids, pH and titratable acidity. Alcohol-insoluble substances were analysed for starch, water-soluble uronides, water-insoluble uronides, cellulose and neutral sugars. The second set of samples was kept in air at 20°C for an additional week, during which respiration and ethylene production rates were measured, prior to the above analyses. Storage in 1% O2 led to the improved maintenance of firmness, reduced respiration and ethylene production rates in ambient air, and a reduced content of water-soluble uronides, suggesting a reduced degree of hydrolysis. The correlation between firmness and water-soluble uronide content was not very strong. The predominant neutral sugars present in the wall were arabinose and galactose, and activities of putative hydrolyses that may be involved in the metabolism of polymers containing these sugars will be discussed.

Free access

Abstract

Intact almond fruits [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb.] showed a transient increase in ethylene production at the time of gum duct initiation. Treatment with ethylene promoted gum duct formation if applied 1 week before natural duct initiation, but had no effect when applied earlier. Silver thiosulfate, applied either as a spray or through bark-feeding, was found to delay natural duct initiation. AO A also delayed duct initiation when applied through bark-feeding, but not when applied as a spray. Chemical name used: aminooxyacetic acid (AOA).

Open Access

Abstract

Cell wall-degrading enzymes were extracted from the cell wall free space of mesocarp tissue from immature almonds [Prunus dulcis(Mill.)D.A. Webb, ‘Nonpareil’]. The activities of several of these enzymes were found to correlate with the development of gum ducts in this tissue. Polygalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.15) and 1,3-β-D-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.39) activities rose sharply at, or just prior to, the early schizogenous stage of duct initiation, while increases in α-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.22), β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23), α-arabinosidase (EC 3.2.1.55), and α-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.24) activities were correlated with the later lysigenous stage of duct formation. Cell wall analysis of almond mesocarp tissue sampled the week preceding gum duct formation determined that the predominant noncellulosic sugars present in the mesocarp cell walls are arabinose, galactose, xylose, and glucose, with smaller amounts of rhamnose and mannose also present. The walls also contain a high percentage of galacturonic acid and trace amounts of glucuronic acid. Methylation analysis of the cell walls confirmed that many of the specific glycosidic linkages that are cleaved by the enzymes tested are present in the mesocarp cell walls immediately prior to gum duct formation.

Open Access

Abstract

As the pistachio (Pistacia vera L. cv. Kerman) nut matured, kernel moisture, respiration rate, and total protein content decreased, while kernel dry weight increased. At optimum maturity, ether-extractable fat and total sugar contents reached a peak. Either or both of these constituents may be useful as a maturity index, in addition to ease of hull separation, to determine optimum harvest date for pistachio nuts. Nut quality was acceptable for harvest during a 2- to 3-week period bracketing the time when the hull separates easily from the shell. Compositional analyses of hulls indicated some limitations on their potential use as animal feed.

Open Access

Abstract

The chemical composition and sensory attributes of pistachio nuts (Pistacia vera L.) were studied in relation to genotype, production area, maturity, moisture content, degree of shell staining, and storage conditions. ‘Kerman’ kernals were rated higher in firmness and sweetness, and lower in crispness, bitterness, and rancidity than those of the ‘Red Aleppo’, ‘Trabonella’, and ‘Bronte’ cultivars. Differences in composition and flavor of ‘Kerman’ pistachios harvested from 3 production areas were small. Nuts harvested at near optimum maturity were superior in quality to those harvested earlier or later. Drying nuts to 4–6% moisture levels resulted in the best quality. Shell staining did not influence eating quality of kernels but detrimentally affected shell appearance. Dried pistachio nuts can be kept for 12 months at 20°C. Moisture content influenced crispness and firmness while total sugars content was related to sweetness and overall flavor intensity.

Open Access