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  • Author or Editor: John Lipe x
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Abstract

Butanedioic acid mono-(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide) applied to ‘Humble’ blackberries (Rubus arvensis Bailey) 2000, 4000 and 6000 mg/liter at full bloom reduced production and delayed ripening. Daminozide applied 3-weeks after bloom did not affect production or berry size with 2000 and 4000 mg/liter, but ripening was delayed. Production was unaffected when (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) at 250 to 4000 mg/liter was applied 1 to 3 days before harvest. Sodium 2,3:4,6-di-0-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonate (dikegulac) at 200 and 2000 mg/liter had no effect on production or harvest season distribution.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Humble’ blackberry (Rubus arvenis Bailey) extractable ethylene content reached more than 7.0 mg/liter shortly after full bloom and dropped to well under 1.0 mg/liter for the remainder of fruit development. The low ethylene levels during the latter stages of fruit development suggests that blackberries are nonclimacteric. ‘Tifblue’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) extractable ethylene was more than 5.0 mg/liter approximately 2 weeks after bloom, declined to near 1.0 mg/liter during green fruit development and peaked at 3.7 mg/liter in reddish-green (ripening) berries. The increased level of ethylene in ripening fruits suggests that rabbiteye blueberries are climacteric.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

In the paper entitled “Ethylene in Fruits of Blackberry and Rabbiteye Blueberry” by John A. Lipe (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 103(1):76-77. 1978) ethylene concentrations in the text are erronously expressed as mg/liter. These units should be ppm of μl/liter

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

In the paper, Ethylene in fruits of blackberry and rabbiteye blueberry by John A. Lipe (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 103(1):76-77, 1978), the ethylene concentration in the text expressed as mg/liter should be μl/liter or ppm.

Open Access

Abstract

Ethylene evolution by detached pecan fruits was measured periodically from mid-season until the completion of shuck dehiscence. Less than 1 µ1 ethylene per kg fresh wt/hr was produced until approximately 1 wk before the initiation of shuck dehiscence, when a maximum rate of almost 20 µ1. per kg/hr was attained. The timing and magnitude of the ethylene peak suggests that ethylene may be a hormonal regulator of dehiscence.

Open Access

Abstract

Pre-germinated onion (Allium cepa L. cv. New Mexico White Grano) seeds, sown in Olton sandy loam soils at 1.7–7.3°C began to emerge after 7 days compared with 30 days for dry non-germinated seeds. Plant stands were established with pre-germinated seeds 12 days earlier than with non-germinated dry seeded onions. The earlier emergence and more rapid growth achieved by pre-germinated seedlings resulted in 10 to 12 days earlier maturity and a 37.5% increase in bulb diameter at harvest. Increased bulb diameter placed 58% of the yield in the 5.1–7.7 cm (2-3 inch) diameter grade compared to 29% for checks and yield of marketable onions was significantly improved.

Open Access

Abstract

Treatments of 0, 2% and 4% Folicote in water were applied to runoff at 0, 7 and 16 days after bloom (DAB) on ‘Norgold Russet’ potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown in the greenhouse. Folicote is a wax emulsion antitranspirant (AT) containing 60% solids. Treatments at 0, 7 and 16 DAB with 2% AT reduced water uptake by >20% for 4, 8, and 14 days respectively, following application. AT treatment at 4% reduced water uptake >40% for 10-14 days. There was no significant reduction of tuber yield even at the higher concentration.

Open Access

Abstract

Three basic types of blackberries (Rubus spp.) are grown in the United States: 1) erect and semierect, 2) western trailing, and 3) southeastern trailing, commonly called “dewberries” (22).

Open Access

Abstract

Almost 100% of the large volume of ethylene produced by dehiscing pecan fruits comes from the seed (kernel) suggesting that the responding tissue (the shuck) receives its message to dehisce directly as ethylene made in the kernel.

Open Access

This research was set up to determine the effectiveness of hydrogen cyanamide as a bloom thinner on peaches and apples. When applied at full bloom hydrogen cyanamide at 0.5 to 1% was effective at reducing fruit set on several varieties of peaches and apples in two different years. Yields were not effected when the lower rates were used. These results indicate that hydrogen cyanamide holds potential as a bloom thinner for both stone fruit and apples when used at the proper rates and timing.

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