Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for

  • Author or Editor: John F. Kelly x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

At Michigan State Univ., the Dept. of Horticulture curriculum has been restructured simultaneously both toward and away from specialization. The traditional commodity orientation has been eliminated in the main track Horticulture option. At the same time, a new highly structured Landscape Design–Construction and Management option has been created. Both of these changes were made in response to industry needs. Additional optional Specializations in Environmental Studies, Agribusiness, and Biotechnology also are available. These require students to take 18–20 credits from specified course lists. These credits may be part of the required courses for the Horticulture major, or may be in addition to that requirement.

Free access
Author:

Abstract

During the past two years as Presidentelect and President of ASHS, I have heard from many of our Members relative to what some have labeled, “The Demise of Horticulture Departments”. Feature articles, editorials, and letters to editors have addressed the subject. Although we cannot deny that many changes have occurred in our applied science units—both private and public, academic and nonacademic—the vast majority of these changes represent progress.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

From 3600 bean cultivars, lines and single plant selections grown at Rancocas, New Jersey, in 1968, 82 were selected as having greater than 33% higher microbiologically available methionine in the mature seed than the ‘Sanilac’ standard. Of these, 63 again assayed more than 33% higher in 1969. Methionine levels varied more within lines of mixed lots than pure lines. A highly significant correlation existed between methionine levels in seed from 2 or 3 crop years. Commercial cultivars, regardless of the seed source, tended to have relatively uniform levels of available methionine. The level of methionine in mature seeds of the common bean is determined genetically and sufficient variation exists within the species to permit improvement through hybridization and selection.

Open Access

Abstract

Michigan State Univ. (MSU) has a long history of rendering outstanding service to the citizens of Michigan, the nation, and the world. Founded in 1855 as the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, the teaching institution soon began its tripartite mission of instruction, research, and public service. In 1862, the college became a prototype for the 68 land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act. Now, 132 years later, MSU has 11 baccalaureate-granting colleges that offer more than 125 programs, many of these offering multiple fields of concentration, and an enrollment of ≈42,000 students.

Open Access

Over the past few years, studies have been conducted exploring the variability in iron nutritional quality from a tropical vegetable, Amaranthus. In order to confirm previous iron bioavailability data, A. cruentus, A. hypochondriacus and A. tricolor lines were grown at the MSU Horticulture Research Center and then analyzed for total and in vitro bioavailable iron. Leaves were harvested 39 days after transplanting, washed, lyophilized and ground. Total iron levels were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy and bioavailable iron estimates derived using an in vitro assay simulating gastrointestinal digestion. Among the lines tested, total iron concentrations ranged from 145 to 506 ppm. Bioavailable iron ranged from 44 to 70 ppm. Both the total and bioavailable iron measured were highest in A. tricolor, similar to results of previous years. Total iron values were lower for all of the lines than detected previously, but the range of bioavailable iron was similar to earlier work. Bioavailable iron estimated using the in vitro procedure does not appear to be greatly influenced by fluctuations in total iron content. Amaranth could provide between 44 and 70 mg Fe/100 gm fresh weight, equal to 20-35% of the daily Fe requirement for women, and 40-70% for men. Future experiments will utilize an animal bioassay to verify differences detected in bioavailable iron.

Free access
Authors: and

Net photosynthesis from whole plants of eight asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) genotypes was measured at two locations in an open infrared gas analysis system. Measurements started at about the completion of full fern growth, which occurred at the end of July and lasted through the season until fern senescence in late September. Net photosynthesis of the eight genotypes ranged from 15.67 to 27.79 μmol·m-2·s-1. Significant differences (P < 0.1) in net photosynthesis were found among the eight genotypes. Both yield and specific leaf mass (SLM) were correlated significantly with net photosynthesis. We suggest that specific leaf mass can be used as a criterion for selecting genotype of high photosynthetic ability. Daily photosynthetic rate patterns were studied and appear to be related to daily changes of stomatal conductance. Seasonal changes of asparagus' photosynthetic activity were studied. High photosynthetic activity was observed from July through August. Photosynthetic activity decreased greatly in September along with the fern maturation and unfavorable changes in environmental conditions.

Free access

Genetic variability in iron bioavailability was examined in different species of Amaranthus, in order to attempt to improve the iron nutritional quality of this vegetable. 35 lines of Amaranthus, surveying 12 species, were selected from the collection at the plant introduction station at Ames, Iowa. These lines were direct seeded at the MSU Horticulture Research Center. 18 lines were harvested on days 28, 35, and 42 after planting, and the other lines were harvested only on day 35. Lyophilized leaf material was analyzed for total iron using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Bioavailable iron was estimated using an invitro assay simulating gastrointestinal digestion. Statistically significant differences in both total and available iron were detected among species and between harvest dates. Total iron concentrations increased from day 28 to 35 and then were decreased on day 42 for all species except A. tricolor. This species accumulated the highest concentration of iron in the leaves of all species examined, increasing to day 42. The bioavailable iron measured was also highest in A. tricolor, yet as a percent of the total iron, this species had the smallest fraction of iron available.

Free access

Abstract

A sketch of Eustace Hall is on the cover of this issue of HortScience. Eustace Hall was designed by Liberty Hyde Bailey and was the first building in the United States devoted exclusively to the study and teaching of horticulture. It was completed in 1888—the year of the founding of the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. It was named Eustace Hall in memory of Harry J. Eustace, Department Head from 1908–1919. In addition to offices and classrooms, the twostory brick structure contained a photographic darkroom and rooms for grafting and storage of nursery stock. Now the home of the University College, it is the second oldest building on campus.

Open Access

Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is used to measure in situ soil moisture content and salinity of porous media. Commercially available TDR systems used for field measurements have limited use in laboratory scale experiments where short high resolution probes are needed. A short TDR probe was designed for use with high bandwidth TDR instruments currently available. The probes are designed from SMA bulkhead connectors using gold-plated stainless steel wire 0.035 inches in diameter. A 20.GHz digital sampling oscilloscope (11801; Tektronix, Beaverton, Ore.) with an SD-24 TDR sampling head is used with the probes to determine water content and ion concentrations in porous media. The 7.5- and 3.0-cm-long probes were used to measure soil moisture content and ion concentrations in laboratory columns. Fertilizer and water gradients were observed by using bromide salts brought into contact with the top of laboratory columns, 7.6 cm in diameter and 18 cm long, packed with container media [1 peat: 1 vermiculite v/v)]. Soil moisture measurements in the presence of high concentrations of salts were made by insulating the probes with Teflon heat-shrinkable tubing to minimize conductivity losses.

Free access