Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Joe Maranto x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Dan E. Parfitt, Craig E. Kallsen, and Joe Maranto

`Golden Hills' is a new female pistachio cultivar with improved performance characteristics compared to the standard female cultivar Kerman. `Golden Hills' produces a greater yield and higher percentage of split, edible nuts than `Kerman' while maintaining a similar low percentage of loose shells and kernels. Harvest date is 2–4 weeks earlier than `Kerman', which will permit growers to extend their harvest period and better utilize their harvesting equipment and personnel. Earlier harvest may reduce disease in the northern production areas of California by permitting an earlier harvest before fall rains, as well as reducing navel orangeworm infestations. The cultivar requires less chilling than `Kerman', which improves uniformity of foliation, bloom, nut set, nut fill, and uniformity of nut maturity at harvest in years with insufficient chilling for `Kerman'. Based on all of our evaluations, this cultivar appears to be an exceptional producer and has the potential to increase grower profits by more than 40%.

Free access

Dan E. Parfitt, Craig E. Kallsen, and Joe Maranto

`Lost Hills' is a new female pistachio cultivar that is being released as a potential replacement for `Kerman', the industry standard female cultivar. `Lost Hills' produced substantially higher percentages of split, edible nuts than `Kerman' in 2003 when split percentages for `Kerman' were very poor due to reduced winter chilling, a condition that is likely to be more frequent in the future. Nut size for `Lost Hills' is larger than for `Kerman'. Harvest date is 2–4 weeks earlier than `Kerman', which will permit growers to extend their harvest period and better utilize their harvesting equipment and personnel. Earlier harvest may reduce disease in the northern production areas of California by permitting an earlier harvest before fall rains, as well as reducing navel orangeworm infestations. The cultivar requires less chilling than `Kerman', which improves uniformity of foliation, bloom, nut set, nut fill, and uniformity of nut maturity at harvest in years with insufficient chilling for `Kerman'. This cultivar could increase grower profits by more than 20% above that received for `Kerman'.

Free access

Dan E. Parfitt, Craig E. Kallsen, and Joe Maranto

`Randy' is an early flowering male pistachio that will be used as a pollenizer for `West Hills' and `Lost Hills'. It has excellent flowering synchrony with `West Hills' and `Lost Hills' and can be used to cover the earlier part of the `Kerman' flowering period during seasons in which `Kerman' flowering is extended. This generally occurs during seasons of low chill, which are expected to become more frequent in the future due to continued global warming. `Peters', the standard male used to pollenize `Kerman', often flowers too late to cover the earlier part of the `Kerman' bloom period under these conditions or to serve as an effective pollenizer for the new female cultivars. `Randy' was selected for high pollen viability, pollen durability, and a high level of pollen production (based on visual evaluation). `Randy' flowers 1–3 weeks earlier than `Peters', the standard pollenizer for `Kerman'.

Free access

Chih-Cheng T. Chao, Dan E. Parfitt, Louise Ferguson, Craig Kallsen, and Joe Maranto

Trunk cross-sectional area from a population of 6192 pistachio trees was used to estimate tree growth from 1995 to 1997. The narrow-sense heritabilities of trunk cross-sectional area were near zero across multiple locations based on analyses of progenies from 20 half-sib families. However, within individual location, there were values from 0.20 to 0.56 for 1995, 1996, and 1997, respectively. Broad-sense heritability estimates were considerably higher, from 0.36 to 0.64 at multiple locations and 0.51 to 1.35 for individual locations. These results suggest that dominance and significant interaction effects, epistatic and genotype by environment, were important. Breeding strategies should emphasize selection of superior parents based on individual performance, and parents should be selected in the environment in which the progeny are intended to be used.

Free access

Dan E. Parfitt, Chih-Cheng T. Chao, Craig Kallsen, Joe Maranto, and Louise Ferguson

A pistachio breeding program was initiated in 1989 to develop new cultivars for the California industry. The program was begun with an initial set of 1940 progeny from 78 crosses. In 1990, an additional 5470 seedlings were produced from 176 controlled crosses. Progeny were planted at Winters, Calif., Kearney Agr. Center, and a plot near Bakersfield in a randomized block design with crosses as treatments. Fifty-three, 962, and 2943 genotypes flowered in 1994, 1995, and 1996, respectively. Data on flowering, flowering date, sex, tree size as measured by trunk cross-section area, and disease status were collected on all trees in the breeding program at the three field locations. Nuts were collected and evaluated for number of nuts/tree, % splits, % blanks, wet and dry weight, kernel weight, and volume. Heritability estimates for nut characters, tree size, and Alternaria resistance were ranged from 0.30 to 0.76. Several parents were identified that apparently provide a high level of resistance to Alternaria. Relationships among various nut parameters and the relationship of tree size to flowering and parentage were also investigated and evaluated statistically. Replicated advanced selection trials will be established in 1997.