Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 1 of 1 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jim Enis x
Clear All Modify Search

Watermelon growers are advised to grow melons in a given field no more than 1 year out of 4. Bermudagrass pastures are abundant in the southern U.S., but ranchers are reluctant to destroy a pasture for 1 year and plant it with melons if they must then re-establish a sod. A project was designed to develop a system for growing watermelon in a permanent pasture with only a minimal amount of tillage, and without destroying the established forages in the pasture. The approach is to compare and evaluate several techniques for growing watermelons in strip-tilled areas within a permanent pasture. These techniques include cultivation, plastic mulches, and herbicides applied to 2-m strips separated by untilled bermudagrass. Research was done in 1996 at two university research centers in Oklahoma and Texas. The treatments with greatest watermelon yields, in decreasing order, were black polyethylene mulch, hand-weeded control, photodegradable mulch, biodegradable mulch, cultivation plus sethoxydim, sethoxydim alone, cultivation alone, and the weedy check. At harvest, 63% of the area in the cultivation alone treatment, 40% of the area in the plastic mulch treatment, and 1% of the area in the sethoxydim treatment were covered with a regrowth of bermudagrass. Forage was also collected from row areas of plots. Forage amounts, in decreasing order, were from cultivation alone, weedy check, sethoxydim alone, photodegradable mulch, polyethylene mulch, biodegradable mulch, cultivation plus sethoxydim, and the clean control.

Free access