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  • Author or Editor: Jericó J. Bello-Bello x
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Intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to evaluate the effects of in vitro culture on genetic variation in Habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) regeneration protocols. A total of 219 ISSR clear and reproducible fragments were generated with 13 ISSR primers in direct organogenesis, direct and indirect somatic embryos, and the embryogenic callus system. A cluster analysis was performed to express in the form of dendrogram the relationships among different regeneration systems and the genetic variability detected. Genetic distance analysis indicated that our regeneration protocols are inappropriate for micropropagation, conservation, or genetic transformation; however, they may be applicable to breeding. This is the first report on the use of molecular analysis to evaluate genetic variation of in vitro-regenerated plants of Habanero pepper using ISSR markers.

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This article describes the performance of nodal segments from Habanero pepper (Capsicum. chinense) during shoot induction and elongation under different semisolid and liquid culture conditions with various degrees of ventilation in which they were exposed to different levels of immersion and growth regulators. The ethylene content in non-ventilated containers, the age of the explant donor plants as well as the effect of thidiazuron and paclobutrazol on shoot induction and of gibberellic acid and AgNO3 on shoot elongation were also evaluated. A temporary immersion bioreactor (BioMINT™) was used for the multiplication and elongation of isolated shoots with very good results. We report an efficient protocol for the in vitro propagation of Habanero pepper that produces plants with a high survival rate when transplanted to soil.

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Malanga (Colocasia esculenta) is a plant genetic resource that requires biotechnological strategies for conservation and propagation. One time-, labor-, and space-saving option is in vitro conservation and regeneration. The objective of this study was to develop a protocol for in vitro regeneration and conservation of germplasm of C. esculenta var. criolla. For conservation through minimal growth, we assessed several concentrations of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium (one-third, one-half, and three-quarter strength), the growth retardant ancymidol (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg·L−1), and the osmoregulator polyethylene glycol (PEG-8000 mw) at different concentrations (0, 10, 20, and 30 g·L−1). For in vitro conservation, the percent survival, shoot number and length, and number of leaves and roots per explant were evaluated after 24 weeks. For in vitro regeneration, different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ: 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mg·L−1) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP; 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mg·L−1) were evaluated. After 4 weeks of cultivation, the percent response, shoot number, and number of leaves per explant were recorded. During in vitro conservation, it was noted that the treatment including 2 mg·L−1 ancymidol resulted in a retarded development, without affecting the survival of the C. esculenta germplasm. With regard to shoot regeneration, 7.60 shoots per explant were obtained using 2 mg·L−1 TDZ. Finally, 98% survival was achieved during the acclimatization process. This study will contribute to the establishment of genetic improvement programs through in vitro conservation and propagation of this valuable plant genetic resource.

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