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  • Author or Editor: Janice R. Seibel x
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Abstract

Ethylene evolution from excised plant parts was tested as an indicator of stage of seasonal development in red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L., syn. C. stolonifera Michx.). A reduction in ethylene production occurs several weeks prior to the time when defoliation can be safely accomplished. This reduction occurs synchronously over the length of the plant, although ethylene production by basipetal tissues prior to the decrease was lower than that by more acropetal tissues. The pattern of change in ethylene production by nodal tissue, which included the axillary buds and about 5 mm of petiole, seemed to be least affected by environmental growing conditions. Ethylene could be used as a predictor for vegetative maturity stage in red-osier dogwood.

Open Access

Abstract

Potted plants of red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L., syn. C. stolonifera Michx) were grown under 3 different dormancy-inducing regimes. Each week 5 plants per group were defoliated and placed in a warm greenhouse. Plants were checked daily for regrowth and new leaves were removed. When defoliation ceased to induce bud break, the plants were considered to be in a state of winter dormancy. Plants were observed for damage the following spring to determine when they had reached vegetative maturity, and it was found that vegetative maturity corresponded to winter dormancy development in all 3 growing conditions.

Open Access