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Abstract

Methazole [2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methy1-1,2,4-oxadiazolidine-3,5-dione] napropamide [2-(α-naphthoxy)-N,N-diethylpropionamide], oryzalin [3,5-dinitro-N4 ,N4 -dipropyl-sulfanilamide], oxadiazon [2-tert-butyl-4-(2,4-dichloro-5-isopropoxyphenyl)-∆2-l,3,4-oxadiazolin-5-one], and simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine] each at 4.5 kg/ha were applied preemergence on June 17, 1976 in a nursery of 6-month-old seedlings of peach [Prunus persica (l.) Batsch cv. Nemaguard]. Though simazine and oryzalin provided better weed control, oxadiazon increased seedling height and trunk diameter from 25 to 89 days after application. All treatments impeded bark adhesion (slippage) 25 days after application but not after either 56 or 89 days. No phytotoxicity was observed from any treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Melfluidide [N-{2,4-dimethyl–5-[[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amino]phenyl} acetamide] applied at 0, 0.9, 1.9, 3.7, 5.6 and 7.5g/liter to 2nd leaf peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch cv. June Gold] on June 14,1976 induced a dwarfing effect on tree height 70 days following treatment which was maintained for the duration of the experiment (471 days). The number of lateral branches increased as early as 100 days after treatment. Lateral branch length was less than that of the check trees. Mefluidide reduced trunk diameter growth over the control. The lowest rate of mefluidide produced slight phytotoxicity but increasing rates caused severe defoliation and other types of phytotoxicity including tree mortality.

Open Access

Leaves of chilled `Moss-Agate' Episcia (Mart.) plants exhibited direct chilling injury (i.e., watersoaked browning of leaf blade interveinal areas within 24 h of exposure to low temperature) immediately following exposure in darkness to 10C for 0.5 or 1.0 h. Chlorophyll fluorescence peak: initial ratios and terminal: peak ratios of chilled Episcia were -reduced 20% and 25%, respectively, 3 h after chilling, a result suggesting possible photosystem II damage. Total leaf chlorophyll content was reduced by 17% within 3 h of chilling and CO2uptake also was reduced at this time. Leaves of chilled `Rudolph Roehrs' Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) (D. Roehrsii Hort.) plants expressed no visible injury within 24 h of 1.2C chilling in darkness for 36,48, or 60 h, but CO2uptake was reduced by 70% compared to the control 3 h after chilling. Visible injury began to appear 27 h after chilling, and the older leaf blades of all chilled plants exhibited a watersoaked appearance 75 h after chilling. Chlorophyll fluorescence peak: initial ratios of chilled Dieffenbachia did not vary, and terminal: peak ratios were not reduced until 147 h after chilling, when the injured tissue was extremely flaccid and translucent. Chilling reduced the chlorophyll content of Dieffenbachia by 10% in some plants 27 h after chilling and by 35%. in all plants 75 h after chilling. Transpiration rate was reduced and stomata] diffusive resistance increased 27 h after chilling.

Free access

Abstract

Anatomical and morphological similarities in flower and fruit development exist among cultivars of peach and nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch ‘June Gold’, ‘Harvester’, and ‘ArmKing’] and some other members of Rosaceae. The abscission of peach and nectarine fruit involves events at 3 recognizable zones between the fruit and the stem. Of these 3 zones, the most distal is the most complex and does not form a discrete separation layer. The basal zone is predominant in samples treated with the ethylene releasing compound, CGA-15281 [(2-chloroethyl) methyl-bis (phenlymethoxy) silane]. Mature fruit from untreated plants generally abscise at the most distal zone.

Open Access

An interdisciplinary team of Clemson Univ. faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students partnered with the South Carolina Botanical Garden staff and children from the “Sprouting Wings” after-school garden program to plan and design a 2.5-acre Children's Garden. Imaginative and educational, the plans call for a series of outdoor theme gardens. Proposals for 13 theme gardens include a “Dinosaur Dig”, a “Food for Thought Garden”, a “Hide-and-Seek Garden”, a “Terraced Sitting Garden”, an “Ethnobotany Garden”, a “Wonders of Water Garden”, a “Learning from Nature Outdoor Classroom”, a “Carolina Fence Garden”, a “Cottage Garden”, a “Bold View Butterfly Garden”, a “Woodland Wonderland”, a “Playful Plaza Garden,” and an “Arbored Entrance and Exit Garden.” Project methodology included research, case studies, site analysis, program development, preliminary plans, master plan, and individual garden designs with plan views, elevation drawings, detail drawings, and plant lists. Using an experiential learning pedagogy, a design class of 15 students contributed an estimated 2,000 hours of work while learning about landscape design. Results included 30 drawing boards depicting research, analysis, and design proposals, which were presented to the South Carolina Botanical Garden Staff for approval in Fall 2003. Note: This material is based upon work supported by the cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, under Agreement No. 2002-38411-122122. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

Free access