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  • Author or Editor: James D. Williams x
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Transplants of `Ohio 8245' tomato grown in 48-cell plastic trays received 5 potassium chloride concentrations and were stressed by withholding water during the 6th week of growth. Gravimetric water loss differed between treatments with decreased water loss associated with increased potassium chloride concentration. As water was withheld, incidence of wilt was greater and more evident at an earlier stage with plants supplied with lowering KCL concentrations. Root and shoot dry weights, plant height and leaf area were not affected by treatments. This indicates an apparent increase in water use efficiency in tomato transplants supplied with KCL at greater concentrations than supplied under standard fertilizer regimes.

Free access

Abstract

Three hundred and one Extension professionals (88.3% response), working in home horticulture educational programs in the United States in 1984, indicated their greatest areas of inservice education needs in program delivery are: 1) increasing expertise in the various subject matter areas, 2) developing skills in plant disorder diagnosis, 3) managing information files for rapid retrieval and dissemination, and 4) developing and implementing innovative programs. Subject matter areas where respondents have the greatest training need are: 1) pest identification and control, 2) diagnosis of plant disorders, 3) weed identification, 4) home fruit production, 5) information on recommended cultivars, and 6) ornamental plant identification. Home vegetable gardening ranked 1st in respondent perception of importance and perception of proficiency needed for job performance.

Open Access

Abstract

A container growing medium of 2 peat : 1 perlite (v/v) was limed with 0, 0.9, 1.8, 2.7, 3.6, 5.4, 7.2, and 9.0 kg·m–3 dolomite. Media were irrigated with water, providing alkalinity equivalent to 0, 38, and 371 mg·liter–1 CaCO3. Samples were incubated at 25° ± 3°C and pH determined at days 2, 5, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 84. Irrigating with even moderately alkaline water over three months increased pH substantially above levels resulting from dolomite amendments alone.

Open Access

Abstract

Spagnum peat, perlite, vermiculite, and six media formulated (by volume) from these constituents (2:1, 1:1, 1:2 peat: perlite; 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 peat: vermiculite) were limed with 0, 0.9, 1.8, 2.7. 3.6, 5.4, 7.2, and 9.0 kg∙m−3 dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]. Media were wet to container capacity with distilled/deionized (d/d) water, incubated at 25° ±3°C, and pH determined at day 0, 2, 5, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 84. Liming reactions in mixes could not be predicted from reactions occurring in sphagnum peat, perlite, and vermiculite constituents alone. Although sphagnum peat made the major contribution to liming reactions, both perlite and vermiculite were found to contribute to liming responses of media in which they were incorporated. The major portion of pH change due to incorporation of pulverized dolomite in peat-based media occurred within 2 days. Change in pH was complete within 14 days.

Open Access