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Open access

John H. Braswell, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Brassaia actinophylla Endl. was larger in growth and better in quality when produced under 828 and 414 μE m−2s−1. Schefflera arboricola Hayata ex Kanehira increased in growth and quality when produced under 414 and 276 μE m−2s−1. Both species increased in growth and generally maintained good quality after a post holding period in an interior environment. Plants produced under the lower production light levels maintained good growth after 3 months indoors under interior light levels of 24, 16 and 8 μE m−2s−1. S. arboricola maintained better quality than B. actinophylla when hdd under the lowest interior light level.

Open access

John H. Braswell, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Plant growth and quality were determined for 2 species of schefflera grown under 3 production light levels and 2 fertilizer treatments. High production light (828 μE m−2s−1) resulted in better growth of Brassaia actinophylla Endl. but generally had no effect on the growth parameters of Schefflera arboricola Hayata ex. Kanehira. Increasing fertilizer levels decreased plant growth and quality for S. arboricola in the production phase but caused no difference for B. actinophylla. However, after 3 months in an interior environment, B. actinophylla produced under the highest light level and S. arboricola produced under the lowest light level (276 μE m−2s−1) maintained better growth and plant quality. Both species receiving the lowest fertilizer treatment (200 mg N/pot·week) were better in growth and quality after 3 months indoors in contrast to the highest fertilizer treatment (400 mg N/pot·week).

Open access

Melissa M. Gibbs, Thomas M. Blessington, James A. Price, and Yin-Tung Wang

Abstract

Flowering performance of crossandra, a potted flowering plant rising in popularity, is not always satisfactory under low interior light levels. However, research has not been conducted to determine the response of this species to low light levels and lighting duration. The response of plants to light conditions is variable. Aphelandra plants were taller but had suppressed flowering under low light (5).

Open access

Evamaria E. Neumaier, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

A 2 × 4 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to test the effect of combinations of soluble fertilizer (20N–8.8P–16.6K) and controlled-release fertilizer (14N–6.2P–11.6K, Osmocote) on flowering, growth, and quality of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. grown under two light levels, 840 μmol·s-1·m-2 (full sun) and 420 μmol·s-1·m-2 (50% shade). Plants grown in full sun flowered earlier and had a larger number of buds and flowers than those in partial shade; how ever, flower diameter was greater with 50% shade. Plants grown in 50% shade were larger and had a darker green color and higher plant quality than those grown in full sun. Light level determined the effect of soluble fertilizer on number of buds, flowers, plant size, leaf area, fresh weight, foliar color, and plant quality. The effect of controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) on flower diameter, leaf area, and foliar color was influenced by light level. Soluble fertilizer and CRF interacted on total buds, flowers, plant size, foliar color, and plant quality. The optimum conditions for growth of high-quality hibiscus plants was found to be 50% shade and a fertilizer combination of 200 ppm N/12 g CRF per 18-cm pot.

Open access

Evamaria E. Neumaier, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted with double-flowering Persian violet (Exacum affine Balf.) to evaluate the effet of gibberellic acid (GA) applied at different flower bud sizes, developmental stages (ages) of the plant, and application frequencies. In Expt. 1, the greatest number of flowers was produced in plants with 8-mm bud size, with the largest flower diameter obtained with 4-mm bud size. Treatment with GA increased the number of flowers. Flower diameter was greatest with a GA concentration of 125 ppm. Plant quality of GA-treated plants was best when sprayed at 8-mm bud size with a concentration of 125 ppm. In Expt. 2, plants treated at 12 weeks after transplanting had the most flowers. Flower diameter decreased for all treated plants and all age groups in comparison with non treated plants. GA at 125 ppm produced the largest increase in number of flowers and maintained a large flower diameter. Plants treated 8 weeks after transplanting with 125 ppm GA had the most desirable plant size and flowering characteristics. In Expt. 3, a single application of 125 ppm GA was the most effective in contrast to multiple applications for flower induction, number of flowers, and flower diameter.

Open access

Barry L. Bequette, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Codiaeum variegatum (L.) Blume var. pictum (Lodd.) Mull, Agr. ‘Bravo’ and ‘Normal’ were produced for 8 months under light levels of 950, 650, or 350 μmol s-1m-2 before being held for 4 months indoors under 6, 12, or 24 hr light duration using either cool-white fluorescent (CWF) or incandescent (INC) lamps. After 8 months of growth in production, plant width and leaf length increased whereas leaf number, thickness, and variegation decreased as production light level decreased. The best quality plants with moderate variegation and adequate growth were those produced under 650 μmol s-1m-2. After 4 months indoors, ‘Bravo’ tolerated interior light conditions more successfully than ‘Norma’. Plants previously produced under 350 μmol s-lm-2 retained more leaves and maintained better plant quality than other production light treatments. Leaf retention was best with 12 hr of postproduction light duration. Adequate lighting to maintain the quality of properly acclimatized plants was provided by either CWF or INC lamps.

Open access

Melissa M. Gibbs, Thomas M. Blessington, James A. Price, and Yin-Tung Wang

Abstract

Pot-grown ‘Angie Physic’ hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.) plants at the tight bud and blooming stages were stored in darkness for 3, 6, or 9 days at 4.5, 10.0, 15.5, 21.0, 26.5, or 32.0C, and then placed in a greenhouse for 21 days. Plants showed the least amount of damage at 10.0 or 15.5C or when stored for 3 days. Plants stored at 10.0 or 15.5C had delayed flowering, larger and more flowers, less flower bud and leaf abscission, and a higher plant quality. Storage for 6 or 9 days resulted in plants with smaller and fewer flowers, greater bud and leaf abscission, less fresh weight, and a lower quality.

Open access

Lelia F. Scott, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. cvs. Mikkel Improved Rochford (MIR), Annette Hegg Dark Red (AHDR), and Gutbier V-14 Glory (GV14) were subjected to 2 storage methods (24 hours/day light or 24 hours/day darkness) for 2, 4, 6, or 8 days, and then held for a 14-day postharvest evaluation period in the greenhouse. Light-stored MIR and AHDR plants had a lower leaf drop but a higher cyathium drop as compared to dark-stored plants. GV14 was unaffected by storage methods. All cultivars retained better postharvest quality when stored for a minimal duration of time.

Open access

Lelia F. Scott, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

Plant width and bract color were greater after the production period for ‘Annette Hegg Dark Red’ and ‘Gutbier V-14 Glory’ poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) when fertilized with Osmocote 14N-6.1P-11.6K than Osmocote 18N-2.6P-10K. Plant height, width, bract color, foliar color, and plant quality increased as fertilizer rates increased from 3 to 9 g/pot. Plants fertilized with 14N-6.1P-11.6K had the least bract loss, greater fresh weight, and the best plant quality after the 30-day postharvest period. Poinsettias fertilized with the lowest rate of 3 g/pot and held for the shortest storage duration had the least leaf, bract, and cyathium loss and highest fresh weight and plant quality. Plants illuminated with the incandescent (INC) light source had the lowest leaf loss and highest fresh weight when compared to cool-white fluorescent (CWF).

Open access

Lelia F. Scott, Thomas M. Blessington, and James A. Price

Abstract

After 4 weeks indoors, ‘Annette Hegg Dark Red’ (‘AHDR’) and ‘Gutbier V-14 Glory’ (‘GV14’) had higher leaf abscission than ‘Mikkel Improved Roch-ford’ (‘MIR’). ‘AHDR’ abscised more bracts than ‘MIR’ or ‘GV14’. Plant grade was highest for ‘GV14’. Fritted Trace Elements-treated (FTE) and Micromax-treated (MICROMAX) plants lost fewer leaves and bracts and had a higher plant grade than Perk-treated (PERK) or Soluble Trace Element Mix-treated (STEM) plants. Plants held in dark storage for 3 or 6 days had greater leaf abscission than plants not subjected to storage. Bract drop was highest for 6 days storage. Dark storage of 0 or 3 days had higher plant grade than 6 days dark storage.