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  • Author or Editor: Jack D. Fry x
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A field study was conducted in southern Louisiana to screen several plant growth regulators (PGRs) for efficacy in suppressing centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.] vegetative growth and seedhead production. PGRs were applied in three sequential treatments in 1988 and included ethephon, glyphosate, mefluidide, paclobutrazol, sethoxydim, and sulfometuron methyl. Ethephon (5.0 kg·ha-1) suppressed mean centipedegrass vegetative growth by 15% with no turf injury. Mefluidide (0.6 kg·ha-1) and ethephon reduced mean seedhead number by 55% and 61%, respectively. Glyphosate (0.6 kg·ha-1) suppressed vegetative and reproductive growth, but caused unacceptable phytotoxicity and reduced centipedegrass cover and quality during Spring 1989. Use of ethephon or mefluidide to reduce trimming requirements or mower operation in hazardous areas may be an effective means of inhibiting centipedegrass growth. Chemical names used: N -(phosphonomethyl) glycine (glyphosate); N -[2,4-dimethyl-5-[[(trifluromethyl) sulfonyl]amino] phenyl]acetimide (mefluidide); 2-[1-(ethoxyimino)butyl] -5[2-(ethylthio) propyl]-3-hydroxy-2-cycIohexen-l-one (sethoxy-dim); 2-[[[[(4,6-dimethyl-2 -pyrimidinyl) amino] carbonyl]amino] sulfonyl]benzoic acid (sulfometuron methyl); (2-chloroethyl) phosphoric acid (ethephon); (±)-(R*R*)β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(l,l-dimethylethyl) -1 H -l,2,4-triazole-l-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Abstract

Small weighing lysimeters were used to determine potential evapotranspiration (ET) (i.e., ET when soil water is not limiting) rates of turf weeds and ground-covers. When ET was monitored during two consecutive summers, white clover (Trifolium repens L.) had the highest mean water use rate (7.4 mm·day-1). Dichondra (Dichondra repens J.R. Forst. and G. Forst.), a low-growing C4 dicot, and barnyardgrass [Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv.], a C4 monocot, used the least water (3.9 and 4.1 mm·day-1, respectively). ‘Merion’ Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), a C3 species, and yellow foxtail [Setaria glauca (L.) Beauv.] and smooth crabgrass [Digitaria ischaemum (Schreb.) Muhl.], C4 species, exhibited intermediate ET rates. Water use rates of these ground-covers should be considered when using them in landscapes. Eradication of some weeds, such as white clover, in well-watered turf areas may be an effective means of reducing ET.

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Abstract

Field and greenhouse studies were conducted to determine effects of deficit irrigation and pre-plant soil incorporation of a hydrophilic polymer on the establishment of ‘Rebel’ tall fescue. In the field, lysimeters containing a sandy clay loam soil were seeded with tall fescue and irrigated with equivalents of 50% or 100% of the potential evapotranspiration (ETp) (i.e., water used when soil moisture is not limiting) of a mature turf. The low irrigation level resulted in poor germination and stand establishment. Pre-plant incorporation of a hydrophilic polymer (98 kg·ha-1) was ineffective in enhancing seedling survival under dry soil conditions. Greenhouse studies evaluating higher levels of polymer application on tall fescue establishment during drought revealed that the polymer did not reduce plant stress until occupying at least 1.0% of the soil volume to a depth of 12.5 cm. Excessive polymer amounts would be required to achieve this proportion in the field.

Open Access

Abstract

Potential evapotranspiration (ET) (i.e., ET when soil water is not limiting) rates of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) and annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) were determined during two consecutive summers using weighing lysimeters in the field. When evaluated under putting green conditions, significant species differences in ET were observed during several weeks in 1985 and 1986. Differences were small, however, and irrigation requirements should not vary much between these species. Both species exhibited lower water use rates in 1986 when cut at 6 mm (4.6 mm·day-1) than at 12 mm (4.9 mm·day-1). These small differences should not greatly affect water requirements of putting green turf maintained at variable cutting heights. Variability of ET throughout the study periods suggests that water savings could result if ET is monitored, and irrigation adjusted accordingly.

Open Access

Field studies were conducted in south Louisiana to identify plant growth regulators that suppress carpetgrass (Axonopus affinis Chase.) seedhead development. In an initial study, best results were obtained with sethoxydim (0.11 kg·ha-1) and sulfometuron methyl (0.6 kg·ha-1), which reduced seedhead development by 88% and 86%, respectively, compared to untreated plots 21 days after treatment. Sulfometuron methyl caused unacceptable carpetgrass injury, however. Evaluation of seven sethoxydim application levels between 0 and 0.34 kg a.i./ha showed that carpetgrass seedhead number and elongation rate declined with increasing sethoxydim amount [SEEDHEAD NUMBER (m-2) = 515 – 1340 (kg), R 2 = 0.82; ELONGATION (cm) = 25.3 – 151 (kg) + 276 (kg2), R 2 = 0.77]. Carpetgrass seedhead production was restricted up to 6 weeks after sethoxydim (0.17 and 0.22 kg·ha-1) application. Chemical names used: (2-[1-(ethoxyimino)butyl]-5-[2-ethylthio)propyl)-3-hydroxy-2-cyclohexen-1-one) (seth-oxydim); (2-[[[[(4,6-dimethyl-2-pyrimidinyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoic acid) (sulfometuron methyl).

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Greenhouse studies were conducted on three warm-season turfgrasses, `Midlawn' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy], `Prairie' buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.], and `Meyer' zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.), and a cool-season turfgrass, `Mustang' tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) to determine 1) water relations and drought tolerance characteristics by subjecting container-grown grasses to drought and 2) potential relationships between osmotic adjustment (OA) and turf recovery after severe drought. Tall fescue was clipped at 6.3 cm once weekly, whereas warm-season grasses were clipped at 4.5 cm twice weekly. The threshold volumetric soil water content (SWC) at which a sharp decline in leaf water potential (ψL) occurred was higher for tall fescue than for warm-season grasses. Buffalograss exhibited the lowest and tall fescue exhibited the highest reduction in leaf pressure potential (ψP) per unit decline in ψL during dry down. Ranking of grasses for magnitude of OA was buffalograss (0.84 MPa) = zoysiagrass (0.77 MPa) > bermudagrass (0.60 MPa) > tall fescue (0.34 MPa). Grass coverage 2 weeks after irrigation was resumed was correlated positively with magnitude of OA (r = 0.66, P < 0.05).

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Establishment of seeded `Zenith' zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) in an existing sward of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is difficult, and chemicals arising from perennial ryegrass leaf and root tissue may contribute to establishment failure. Experiments were done to evaluate zoysiagrass emergence and growth in soil amended with perennial ryegrass leaves or roots, or after irrigation with water in which perennial ryegrass leaves or roots had previously been soaked. Compared to unamended soil, soil amended with perennial ryegrass leaves at 12% and 23% by weight reduced zoysiagrass seedling number 20% and 26%, respectively; root area and mass were reduced 50% when amendments comprised 12% of soil weight. Similar reductions in zoysiagrass seedling emergence and growth were observed in a second soil amendment study, regardless of whether perennial ryegrass was treated with glyphosate or not. Soil mixed with perennial ryegrass leaves, but not roots, at 12% by weight had a high soil conductivity (5.1 dS·m–1), which could have contributed to reduced zoysiagrass emergence and growth. More than 50% fewer zoysiagrass seedlings emerged and root mass was up to 65% lower when irrigated with water in which perennial ryegrass leaves or roots at 5, 10, or 20 g·L–1 were previously soaked for 48 hours. Zoysiagrass leaf area, and root length and area, were also lower when irrigated with water previously containing perennial ryegrass roots. Perennial ryegrass leaves and roots have the capacity to inhibit emergence and growth of `Zenith' zoysiagrass seedlings, which could negatively affect stand establishment.

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Zoysiagrass, in general, has few insect pest problems but may suffer significant damage from infestations of the bluegrass billbug (Sphenophorus parvulus Gyllenhal). This study evaluated ‘Meyer’ and DALZ 0102 zoysiagrass (both Zoysia japonica Steud.) and 31 experimental zoysiagrass progeny, including reciprocal crosses between Z. japonica × Z. matrella (L.) Merr. or crosses between ‘Emerald’ (Z. japonica × Z. pacifica Goudsw.) × Z. japonica. These grasses were evaluated in adjacent experiments with 18 progeny in one and 13 in another. Plots were maintained under golf course fairway conditions and experienced natural infestations of the bluegrass billbug in 2009 and 2010 with larval damage primarily evident in June and continuing throughout the remainder of the growing season. ‘Meyer’ suffered the highest level of damage on each of six rating dates, ranging from 17% to 38% of the experimental plot area affected. Among the zoysiagrass progeny, damage ranged from 0% to 35% with most showing less than 15% damage. Overall, zoysiagrass progeny associated with reciprocal crosses of Z. japonica × Z. matrella or ‘Emerald’ × Z. japonica were less susceptible to bluegrass billbug than ‘Meyer’.

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In 1992 and 1993, 12 postemergence herbicide treatments were applied to field-grown buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] seedlings having 1 to 3 leaves and 2 to 4 tillers, respectively. The only herbicide treatments that did not cause plant injury at 1 or 2 weeks after treatment (WAT) or reduce turf coverage 4 or 6 WAT compared to nontreated plots (in 1992 or 1993) were (in kg·ha–1) 0.6 dithiopyr, 0.8 quinclorac, 2.2 MSMA, and 0.8 clorpyralid. Evaluated only in 1993, metsulfuron methyl (0.04 kg·ha–1) also caused no plant injury or reduction in coverage. Fenoxaprop-ethyl (0.2 kg·ha–1) caused severe plant injury and reduced coverage by >95% at 6 WAT. Dicamba reduced coverage by 11% at 6 WAT in 1992 but not 1993. The chemicals (in kg·ha–1) triclopyr (0.6), 2,4-D (0.8), triclopyr (1.1) + 2,4-D (2.8), 2,4-D (3.1) + triclopyr (0.3) + clorpyralid (0.2), and 2,4-D (2.0) + mecoprop (1.1) + dicamba (0.2) caused plant injury at 1 or 2 WAT in 1992 or 1993, but coverage was similar to that of nontreated turf by 6 WAT. Chemical names used: 3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (clorpyralid); 3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid (dicamba); (+/–)-2-[4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenoxy]propanoic acid (diclofop); 3,5-pyridinedicarbothioic acid, 2-(difluoromethyl)-4-(2-methylpropyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)-S,S-dimethyl ester (dithiopyr); 2-[4-[(6-chloro-2-benzoxazolyl)oxy]phenoxy] propanoate (fenoxaprop-ethyl); 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid (mecoprop); methyl 2-[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoate (metsulfuron methyl); monosodium salt of methylarsonic acid (MSMA); 3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinclorac); [(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy] acetic acid (triclopyr); (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D).

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