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  • Author or Editor: J.R. Baggett x
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‘Oregon 605’ Pea (Pisum sativum L.) was developed primarily for commercial freezing in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. It is resistant to the enation mosaic-red clover vein mosaic virus complex, a limiting factor in Western Oregon pea production. ‘Oregon 605’ is also resisitant to powdery mildew., an advantage in seed production areas and possible processing areas such as Northeastern Oregon and Southeastern Washington. ‘Oregon 605’ was released jointly by the Oregon and Washington Agricultural Experiment Stations.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Oregon 605’ pea (Pisum sativum L.) was developed primarily for commercial freezing in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. It is resistant to the enation mosaic-red clover vein mosaic virus complex, a limiting factor in Western Oregon pea production. ‘Oregon 605’ is also resistant to powdery mildew, an advantage in seed production areas and possible processing areas such as Northeastern Oregon and Southeastern Washington. ‘Oregon 605’ was released jointly by the Oregon and Washington Agricultural Experiment Stations.

Open Access
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‘Corvallis’ pea was developed for home garden use in western Oregon and other areas of the northwest where pea production is limited by a complex of enation mosaic and pea streak viruses. In these areas, susceptible cultivars must be planted in Feb. or March to escape virus infection, and, even then, serious damage occurs in some seasons. Since wet springs typify most of the areas involved and often make the soil unworkable in Feb.-March, resistant cultivars are needed to permit April-June planting.

Open Access
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Clubroot-resistant cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group) inbred breeding lines Oregon 100, 123, 140, and 142 have been released by the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. They were developed at Corvallis, Ore., in field plots with established infestations of Plasmodiophora brassicae Wor., the causal organism of clubroot. The lines have shown useful field resistance to clubroot in British Columbia and northwestern Washington. These lines have good horticultural characteristics, especially short cores and high solidity, and most combinations among them produce F1 hybrids of excellent type. Some F1 hybrid combinations are of acceptable size and quality for sauerkraut use. One or more of these lines may be usable as commercial clubroot-resistant cultivars for market or home garden.

Open Access
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‘Oregon Sugarpod’ edible-pod pea (Pisum sativum L.), was released by the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station in 1971. Initially developed for areas of the Pacific Northwest where enation mosaic virus is a problem, this cultivar appears to be finding wider acceptance because it bears large pods comparable to those of ‘Mammoth Melting Sugar’ but on a dwarf plant similar to the ‘Perfection’ types. In this respect, it may be unique among American cultivars.

Open Access
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Abstract

Pea (Pisum sativum L.) breeding lines Oregon M176, S423, S434, and S441, were released in 1975 by the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. These lines, all of freezing type, were developed primarily for Western Oregon where enation mosaic and pea streak are often seriously damaging to the later plantings of processing peas.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Oregon CR-1’ is a late maturing cultivar of broccoli, Brassica oleracea (Italica group), resistant to clubroot, Plasmodtophora brassicae. Wor. It was released by the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station for commercial production and as a source of clubroot resistance for plant breeders.

Open Access
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Inheritance of a twisted pod characteristic, in which bean pods develop with a twist that sometimes exceeds 360°, was studied in crosses between round-podded green bean cultivars. In crosses between `Oregon 91G' (normal) or `Oregon 54' (normal) and OSU 5256-1 (twisted), the F1 was normal. Segregation in F2 populations, tested over a 4-year period and including 4,995 plants, clearly fit a 3 normal: 1 twisted ratio. All plants of backcrosses of the F, to the normal parent were normal and backcrosses of the F1 to the twisted parent segregated 1 normal: 1 twisted. The ratios observed indicated that twisted pods are conditioned by a single recessive gene for which the symbol tw is proposed.

Free access

Abstract

‘Gallatin 50’, a bush cultivar not of ‘Blue Lake’ background, and ‘Oregon 1604’, a bush cultivar of ‘Blue Lake’ type, were crossed with distortion susceptible lines of ‘Blue Lake’ type. Environment affected distortion expression; the best expression was obtained in the greenhouse while expression was much reduced in the field. Ratios obtained suggested distortion is primarily controlled by a single dominant gene, designated Ld. ‘Oregon 1604’ carries the recessive allele for normal. ‘Gallatin 50’ carries a major dominant gene, designated Ds, that supresses the expression of the dominant gene Ld for leaf distortion tendency. Results also suggested that modifying factors are involved and are responsible for levels of susceptibility among parents and progenies. Additional crosses between susceptible lines showing severe to mild distortion indicated that these lines carried the same major genes for distortion, but differed in modifying factors.

Open Access
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Abstract

Immature white seedcoat (IW), consisting of reduced green color in immature seedcoats and early development of white color in white seeded cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris, is described. IW was found in 9 of 66 commercial cultivars. It occurs irrespective of mature seedcoat colors, pod pigmentation, or wax vs. green pod color. Genetic analyses of progenies from 6 crosses indicated IW is conditioned by a single recessive gene which is not linked with the P locus for mature seedcoat color or with Y for green vs. wax pod. The gene designation iw is proposed for immature white seedcoat.

Open Access