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J. R. Baggett and D. Kean

An abnormal pod condition, in which bean pods are twisted, sometimes as much as 360°, was discovered in a selection of OSU 5256, a Bush Lake breeding line. The amount of twisting of affected pods and the number of affected pods/plant are both variable. F2 progenies from crosses between twisted pod line 5256-1 and two normal bush Blue Lake cultivars segregate 3 normal:1 twisted, showing that the twisted mutant is controlled by a single recessive gene.

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J.R. Baggett and D. Kean

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J.R. Baggett and D. Kean

Inheritance of a twisted pod characteristic, in which bean pods develop with a twist that sometimes exceeds 360°, was studied in crosses between round-podded green bean cultivars. In crosses between `Oregon 91G' (normal) or `Oregon 54' (normal) and OSU 5256-1 (twisted), the F1 was normal. Segregation in F2 populations, tested over a 4-year period and including 4,995 plants, clearly fit a 3 normal: 1 twisted ratio. All plants of backcrosses of the F, to the normal parent were normal and backcrosses of the F1 to the twisted parent segregated 1 normal: 1 twisted. The ratios observed indicated that twisted pods are conditioned by a single recessive gene for which the symbol tw is proposed.

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Rebecca J. McGee and James R. Baggett

There was no difference in percentage in vitro germination of pollen from stringless pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Sugar Daddy and stringy `Oregon Sugarpod II' (OSP) and `OSU 705' (705). However, pollen tubes of `Sugar Daddy' grew more slowly in vitro than those of OSP or 705. Differences in pollen tube growth rate were demonstrated in vivo following time-course pollinations involving reciprocal crosses of `Sugar Daddy' with OSP and 705, along with the selfed parents. After 8 hours, pollen tubes from stringless peas (“stringless” pollen) had entered 13% of the ovules compared with 51% for those from stringy peas (“stringy” pollen). Stringless pollen tubes entered 29% and stringy pollen tubes 66% of the ovules after 10 hours. The slower growth of stringless compared with stringy pollen tubes is a plausible explanation for previously observed deficiencies of stringless plants in segregating populations.

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Rebecca J. McGee and James R. Baggett

In crosses between stringless and stringy podded pea cultivars, all plants of the F1 and backcross to the stringy parent had stringy pods. F2 ratios varied widely among crosses, and populations always had more stringy plants than expected, based on a single locus. The ratio of nonsegregating (stringy): segregating F3 families derived from stringy F2 plants fit a single-gene hypothesis in half of the crosses. Backcrosses of F1 to the stringless parent fit the expected 1:1 ratio when the pollen parent was stringless, but the reciprocal backcrosses showed a deficiency of stringless plants, suggesting that poor competitive ability of pollen bearing the stringless factor was the reason for deficiencies of stringless plants. It is concluded that stringlessness is controlled by a single recessive gene for which the designation sin-2 is proposed. A reduction in pod size, plant height, and number of wrinkled seed segregates was associated with stringlessness.

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K. Kasimor, J.R. Baggett and R.O. Hampton

Commercial pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, plant introduction (PI) lines, and Oregon State Univ. (OSU) breeding lines were tested for resistance to pathotype P2 (lentil strain) and pathotype P1 (type strain) of pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV) and to bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) to assess the relative proportion of resistant and susceptible pea genotypes. Of the 161 commercial cultivars tested, 117 (73%) were resistant and 44 were susceptible to PSbMV-P2. Of these PSbMV-P2-resistant cultivars, 115 were tested for resistance to BYMV and all were resistant. Of the 44 PSbMV-P2-susceptible cultivars, 43 were tested for BYMV susceptibility and all were infected except two, `Quincy' and `Avon', both of which were susceptible to a BYMV isolate in another laboratory. Of 138 commercial cultivars inoculated with PSbMV-P1, all were susceptible. All PI lines and OSU breeding lines that were resistant to PSbMV-P1 were resistant also to PSbMV-P2. The high percentage of commercial cultivars resistant to PSbMV-P2 was probably attributable to the close linkage of genes sbm-2 and mo and the widespread use by breeders of BYMV-resistant `Perfection' and `Dark Skin Perfection' in developing new pea cultivars. Segregation ratios in progenies of three separate crosses between PSbMV-P2-resistant and PSbMV-P2-susceptible cultivars closely fit the expected 3 susceptible: 1 resistant ratio expected for resistance conferred by a single recessive gene.

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J.R. Baggett, D. Kean and N.S. Mansour

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J.R. Baggett, N.S. Mansour and D. Kean