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  • Author or Editor: J.L. Bowers x
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Abstract

The correlation between each of the green fruit characters: carpel separation, firmness, and skin toughness with balloon bloating in salt stock was significant. As percentage of carpel separation increased the percentage of balloon bloating increased. As fruit firmness and skin toughness increased the percentage of balloon bloaters decreased. Firmness and skin toughness measurements on green fruit were significantly correlated with the same measurements on brine stock.

There was no significant correlation between lens bloating and any one of the three green fruit characters. The multiple correlation coefficient between carpel separation, fruit firmness, and lens bloating was significant. The regression equation of Ȳ = −1.21A −8.42B + 248.79 is useable in predicting lens bloating where A is percent carpel separation and B is firmness of green fruit. The estimate of lens bloating from use of this equation was just as reliable as the equation using all three green fruit characters.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Elite’ (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.), has been released by the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, to meet the needs of gardeners and commercial processors for a well adapted cream type.

Open Access

Abstract

Plant production was increased by treating ‘Centennial’ and ‘Julian’ sweetpotato roots with 250 to 1000 ppm GA or 1000 to 4000 ppm CEPA (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid). In general, GA treated plants were taller than controls and CEPA treated plants were shorter. Cutting roots into sections also increased plant production regardless of chemical treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

The Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of ‘Fall Green’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). ‘Fall Green’ offers the potential of a high level of resistance to many of the common, destructive spinach diseases.

Open Access

Abstract

The Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of ‘Encore’ southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp], ‘Encore’ has potential as both a commercial and home garden cultivar because of its high yield (Table 1), concentrated set, and bush plant habit (Fig. 1).

Open Access

Southernpeas are an important crop to Arkansas processors, market gardeners and home gardeners. While the bulk of the acreage produced in the state is pinkeye purple hull types, there is a demand for other horticultural types. At present some processors consider `White Acre' to be the standard of cream pea quality, but under Arkansas conditions, `White Acre' produces excessive vine growth, is very late to mature and is susceptible to bacterial blight. For these reasons, the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of `Early Acre'. `Early Acre' has been widely tested under the designation Arkansas 84-154 and produces a very compact bush plant that has seed similar in size and shape to `White Acre', but matures 8-10 days earlier under Arkansas conditions. Although the plant type is well suited to narrow row spacing, `Early Acre' has produced yields similar to `White Acre' when both are planted at conventional row spacings. Samples have been canned by the Dept. of Food Science at the University of Arkansas and the samples have been rated equal to `White Acre' in processed quality. “Early Acre' has exhibited high levels of resistance to bacterial blight in replicated yield trials under field epidemics in both Arkansas and Texas.

Free access