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  • Author or Editor: J.H. Bowen x
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Abstract

‘Milam’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) has been released for public use to provide an alternative cultivar to ‘Loring’ especially in areas where ‘Loring’ is unadapted. Fruit of ‘Milam’ (Fig. 1) mature in about the same season at that of ‘Loring’ but ‘Milam’ is productive over a greater part of Texas than ‘Loring’.

Open Access

Zinc supplied as a fulvic-based Zn compound was absorbed and retranslocated to unsprayed new growth as effectively as zinc sulphate in apple seedlings of low Zn status grown hydroponically in the greenhouse. Similarly, fulvic- and humic-based compounds were as effective as zinc sulphate at improving short-term growth and Zn uptake into new tissues in Zn-deficient apple seedlings, with the best growth occurring at spray concentrations of Zn at 500 mg·L-1. Under field conditions, Zn concentration of peeled and washed `Jonagold' apples at harvest was increased, without phytotoxicity, by two or four postbloom sprays of fulvic Zn. It is therefore possible to use this material safely as an effective Zn-source after bloom. However the mobility of the foliar-applied Zn is limited and any yield response by treated apple orchards of marginal Zn nutrition is unlikely to occur in the short term (within two growing seasons).

Free access

Hot water treatments (HWTs), at a range of temperatures (43 to 55C) and durations (10 sec to 30 min), were applied to floret groups of `Shogun' broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var italica) directly after harvest. Floret groups were then stored at 20C in the dark for 3 days. A range of optimal treatments was found in which yellowing was markedly reduced, and heat damage (water soaking and decay) did not occur. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that in the optimum treatment that prevented yellowing the Fv/Fm ratio following HWT decreased immediately and was maintained at a constant level for the next 3 days. A further experiment examined the effect of HWT durations up to 20 min at 47C on fluorescence and yellowing. Longer durations of HWTs (>5 min) progressively reduced yellowing and the Fv/Fm ratio. From these three experiments a HWT of 47C for 7.5 min was selected as the best treatment. This treatment consistently reduced yellowing for up to 5 days. A decrease in the Fv/Fm ratio may be a useful indicator of broccoli florets response to hot water treatments.

Free access