Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: J.A. Murphy x
Clear All Modify Search

Interest in the health benefits of vegetables prompted an investigation of the levels of carotenoids in commercial varieties and UA breeding lines of spinach. Plant carotenoids perform a critical function as antioxidants, providing protection against a variety of reactive oxygen species generated primarily during photosynthesis. When ingested by humans, these compounds maintain their antioxidant activities and are receiving considerable attention in relation to multiple health benefits, including cancer prevention. While the best-known and most-studied carotenoid is beta-carotene, other carotenoids are now receiving attention due to their higher antioxidant activity compared to beta-carotene. Most dark-green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale, are relatively high in carotenoids, especially lutein. In this study, significant differences in average content of both lutein and beta-carotene were found between genetic lines of spinach. Some lines exhibited considerable variation between plants, while others were highly uniform. There was a very high correlation (r 2 = 0.96) between lutein content and betacarotene content. The significant difference between spinach lines suggests that improvement of general carotenoid antioxidants and lutein could be obtained through a breeding program.

Free access

A method for measuring soil water potential in field soils was adapted for use in turfgrass soils. The system uses tensiometers installed flush with the soil surface and permits a measuring depth as shallow as 2.5 to 5.0 cm. Water potential within a tensiometer was measured with a portable pressure transducer. Linear relationships between water potential measured with mercury manometers or vacuum gauge-equipped tensiometers and the pressure transducer were obtained (r2 = 0.99 and 0.97, respectively). The system accurately measures soil water potential of turfgrass soils, while permitting routine cultural practices to be performed.

Free access

Take-all patch, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Sacc.) Arx. & D. Olivier var. avenae (E.M. Turner) Dennis (Gga), is a disease of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera Huds.), which most often is associated with golf courses. Synthesis of ligneous and phenolic compounds by plants requires adequate Mn+2 and Cu+2 nutrition and may be a factor in disease resistance. An experiment was conducted on a creeping bentgrass fairway naturally infested with Gga to determine if foliar applications of Mn+2 (1.02 and 2.04 kg·ha–1 per application) and Cu+2 (0.68 kg·ha–1 per application) would reduce take-all severity. Prior to initiating treatments, soil pH was 6.4 and Mehlich-3 extractable Mn+2 and Cu+2 were 5 mg·kg–1 and 1.7 mg·kg–1, respectively. Manganese and copper sulfate treatments were initiated in July 1995 and foliarly applied every 4 weeks through 1997 with the exception of December, January, and February. Disease incidence was decreased from 20% on untreated turf to 5% with the high rate of MnSO4. For both years, turf treated with the high rate of Mn+2 had less disease than turf receiving the low rate of Mn+2. The application of CuSO4, however, did not influence disease development.

Free access