Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: J. Nienhuis x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

C.L. Boehm, H.C. Harrison, G. Jung, and J. Nienhuis

Genetic differences among eleven cultivated and eight wild-type populations of North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.) and four cultivated populations of South Korean ginseng (P. ginseng C.A. Meyer) were estimated using RAPD markers. Cultivated P. ginseng population samples were collected from four regions of S. Korea. Cultivated P. quinquefolium population samples were collected from three regions in North America: Wisconsin, the Southeastern Appalachian region of the United States, and Canada. Wild-type P. quinquefolium was collected from three states in the United States: Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. Evaluation of germplasm with 10 decamer primers resulted in 100 polymorphic bands. Genetic differences among populations indicate heterogeneity. The genetic distance among individuals was estimated using the ratio of discordant bands to total bands scored. Multidimensional scaling of the relationship matrix showed independent clusters corresponding to the distinction of species, geographical region, and wild versus cultivated types. The integrity of the clusters was confirmed using pooled chi-square tests for fragment homogeneity.

Free access

Kathryn R. Kleiner, John J. Frett, and James Nienhuis

Lima beans are an important vegetable crop to the processing industry in Delaware, but yields in Delaware are below other areas due to heat. The objective was to correlate RAPD markers from heat-tolerant and intolerant cultivars with phenotypic data. Twenty-five primers were used, 10 of which generated 25 polymorphic bands among 11 cultivars. MDS analysis of genetic distance among the cultivars shows segregation into two major clusters, with Kingston as a distant outlier. Kingston's position can be correlated to published data reporting its consistently good yields even when temperatures are high. The results of this study indicate RAPD markers may be used to screen for cultivars that have high yield potentials despite high temperatures. Further studies to screen F, and inbreeds will determine the usefulness of these markers in breeding programs.

Free access

C.L. Boehm, H.C. Harrison, G. Jung, and J. Nienhuis

The magnitude of genetic differences among and the heterogeneity within cultivated and wild American ginseng populations is unknown. Variation among individual plants from 16 geographically separated, cultivated populations and 21 geographically separated, wild populations were evaluated using RAPD markers. Cultivated populations from the midwestern U.S., the southern U.S., and Canada were examined. Wild populations from the midwestern U.S., the southern U.S., and the eastern U.S. were examined. Polymorphic bands were observed for 15 RAPD primers, which resulted in 100 scored bands. Variation was found within and among populations, indicating that the selected populations are heterogeneous with respect to RAPD markers. The genetic relationships among individual genotypes were estimated using the ratio of discordant bands to total bands scored. Multidimensional scaling of the relationship matrix showed independent clusters corresponding to the geographical and cultural origins of the populations. The integrity of the clusters were confirmed using pooled chi-squares for fragment homogeneity. Average gene diversity (Hs) was calculated for each population sample, and a one-way analysis of variance showed significant differences among populations. Overall, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the RAPD procedure for evaluating genetic relationships and comparing levels of genetic diversity among populations of American ginseng genotypes.

Free access

Gino E. Beltrán, Geunwha Jung, James Nienhuis, and Mark J. Bassett

The development of a complete linkage map, including both classical (visible) and molecular markers, is important to understand the genetic relationships among different traits in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objective of this study was to integrate classical marker genes into previously constructed molecular linkage maps in common bean. Bulked segregant analysis was used to identify 10 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to genes for five classical marker traits: dark green savoy leaf (dgs), blue flower (blu), silvery [Latin: argentum] green pod (arg), yellow wax pod (y) and flat pod (a spontaneous mutation from round to flat pod in `Hialeah' snap bean). The genes for dark green savoy leaf (dgs) and blue flower (blu) were located in a previously constructed molecular linkage map. These results indicate that classical marker genes and molecular markers can be integrated to form a more complete and informative genetic linkage map. Most of the RAPD markers were not polymorphic in the two mapping populations used, and molecular markers from those mapping populations were not polymorphic in the F2 populations used to develop the RAPD markers. Alternative genetic hypotheses for the pod shape mutation in `Hialeah' are discussed, and the experimental difficulties of pod shape classification are described.

Open access

Wesley Gartner, Paul C. Bethke, Theodore J. Kisha, and James Nienhuis

Sugars, including glucose, fructose, and sucrose, contribute significantly to the flavor and consumer acceptance of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Sugar accumulation and changes in sugar profiles during snap bean development contribute to overall assessments of quality for breeding lines and cultivars. Developing fruit from a diverse group of four snap bean cultivars containing Andean germplasm and one Mesoamerican dry bean cultivar were sampled at 5-day intervals from 10 to 30 days after flowering over 2 years. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose in pod and seed tissue was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Percent seed mass relative to pod mass increased with days after flowering, but the rate of increase was heterogeneous among cultivars. Significant differences in sugar accumulation patterns of mono- and disaccharides were observed with time of development and between pods and seeds. Glucose and fructose decreased rapidly in pods and seeds with time after flowering. In contrast, sucrose concentration increased in pod tissue but remained constant in seeds of the snap bean cultivars with time after flowering. The patterns of changes in pod and seed sugar concentrations with time after flowering were similar among all snap bean cultivars. In contrast to the snap beans, seed sucrose increased with time after flowering in the Mesoamerican dry bean cultivar Puebla 152. No year by day after flowering interactions were observed for sugar accumulation patterns or sugar concentrations. Younger snap beans had the highest sweetness index based on observed sugar concentrations, percent seed mass, and perception of relative sweetness by the human palate. Although mean sweetness varied between cultivars, the rate of decrease in sweetness with time was the same for all five cultivars. These findings indicate that variation for sweetness exists in snap beans and can be exploited by breeding to develop cultivars with a potentially more desirable, sweet flavor.

Free access

J.G. Tivang, J. Nienhuis, O.S. Smith, and J.S.C. Smith

The statistical properties associated with molecular markers are important when used to characterize germplasm. Evaluation of these properties are necessary for informed selection of one marker system over another. Five different molecular marker systems, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLPs), Arbitrary Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (AP-PCR), Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPDs), Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLPs), and Isozymes were used to evaluate 39 elite corn belt inbreds. Each system was characterized for fragment frequency distribution, and band correlation distribution as a measure of independence. A regression model estimating resolution and rate of information addition was constructed using the sampling variance. All marker systems were evaluated according to this model. The model facilitated genetic relationships among the inbreds to be compared at equivalent performance level among all marker systems. Four performance levels resulted in 10 comparisons. Pairwise test of significance were conducted using t tests where the null-distributions were obtained by the bootstrap procedure. The maker system were ranked, assisting breeders in selecting marker systems for germplasm organization.

Free access

J.M. Quintana, H.C. Harrison, J. Nienhuis, J.P. Palta, K. Kmiecik, and E. Miglioranza

To understand the genetics that control pod Ca concentration in snap beans, two snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) populations consisting of 60 genotypes, plus 4 commercial cultivars used as checks, were evaluated during Summers 1995 and 1996 at Hancock, Wis. These populations were CA2 (`Evergreen' × `Top Crop') and CA3 (`Evergreen' × `Slimgreen'). The experimental design was an 8×8 double lattice repeated each year. No Ca was added to the plants grown in a sandy loam soil with 1% organic matter and an average of 540 ppm Ca. To ensure proper comparison for pod Ca concentration among cultivars, only commercial sieve size no. 4 pods (a premium grade, 8.3 to 9.5 mm in diameter) were sampled and used for Ca extractions. After Ca was extracted, readings for Ca concentration were done via atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In both populations, genotypes and years differed for pod Ca concentration (P = 0.001). Several snap bean genotypes showed pod Ca concentrations higher than the best of the checks. Overall mean pod Ca concentration ranged from a low of 3.82 to a high of 6.80 mg·g-1 dry weight. No differences were detected between the populations. Significant year×genotype interaction was observed in CA2 (P = 0.1), but was not present in CA3. Population variances proved to be homogeneous. Heritability for pod Ca concentration ranged from 0.48 (CA2) to 0.50 (CA3). Evidently enhancement of pod Ca concentration in beans can successfully be accomplished through plant breeding.

Free access

J.M. Quintana, H.C. Harrison, J.P. Palta, J. Nienhuis, K. Kmiecik, and E. Miglioranza

Two commercial snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars (Hystyle and Labrador) that differ in pod Ca concentration were grown aeroponically to assess physiological factors associated with these differences. Xylem flow rate, Ca absorbed, and Ca concentration in sieve sap and pods (all and commercial size no. 4) were measured. Flow rate, Ca absorption and pod Ca concentration, but not sap Ca concentration, differed between cultivars, and this suggests that genetic variability in pod Ca concentration is caused mainly by differences in flow rate, rather than differences in sap Ca concentration. `Hystyle' showed 1.6 times greater flow rate, 1.5 times greater pod Ca concentration, and 1.7 times greater Ca absorbed than `Labrador'. Flow rate correlated positively with Ca absorbed (R = 0.90), Ca concentration in pods of size no. 4 (R = 0.55), and total pods (R = 0.65). Plant maturity influenced sap Ca concentration and Ca translocated increased as plant matured. These results provide evidence that flow rate differences may cause variability for pod Ca concentration in snap beans.

Free access

J.M. Quintana, H.C. Harrison, J. Nienhuis, J.P. Palta, and K. Kmiecik

This study was designed to compare snap and dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for pod Ca concentration, and to identify genetic resources that might be useful in breeding programs directed to increase Ca concentration in bean pods. Pods from eight snap bean and eight dry bean cultivars were evaluated for Ca concentration during 1995 and 1996 at Hancock, Wis. A randomized complete-block design was utilized with three replications in 1995 and six in 1996. Beans were planted in June and hand-harvested in August for both experiments. Soil Ca at planting time was 580 mg·kg–1 in 1995 and 500 mg·kg–1 in 1996. No additional Ca was added. Plots consisted of 10 plants each. At harvest, a pooled sample of 10 to 15 size no. 4 pods was collected from each plot. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine Ca content. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.01) were detected among and within bean types (dry and snap). Although bean type × year interaction was nonsignificant, a strong year effect was observed (P ≤ 0.01). Snap beans (4.6 ± 0.7 mg·g–1 dry weight) had significantly higher pod Ca concentration than did dry beans (4.2 ± 0.6 mg·g–1 dry weight). Within snap beans, `Checkmate' had the highest pod Ca concentration (5.5 ± 0.3 mg·g–1 dry weight) and `Nelson' the lowest (3.8 ± 0.3 mg·g–1 dry weight). Within dry beans, `GO122' had the highest (5.1 ± 0.4 mg·g–1 dry weight) and `Porrillo 70' the lowest pod Ca concentration (3.6 ± 0.3 mg·g–1 dry weight). Six cultivars had pod Ca concentrations significantly (P ≤ 0.01) higher than the overall mean (4.4 ± 0.3 mg·g–1 dry weight).

Free access

J.M. Quintana, H.C. Harrison, J.P. Palta, J. Nienhuis, and K. Kmiecik

To measure the effect of added Ca fertilizer on the Ca concentration of snap bean pods, four snap bean cultivars were grown during Summer 1996 and 1997 at Hancock, Wis. Fertilizer treatments consisted of 80 kg of Ca per hectare applied as Ca sulfate (CaSO4·2H2O) or Ca nitrate [Ca(NO3)2], and the control (no Ca applied. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with a factorial set of treatments (4 × 3). Calcium sulfate was applied at planting, whereas Ca nitrate was split applied four times at weekly intervals starting 1 week before flowering. Yield and Ca concentration in pods were determined. The statistical analysis showed no significant effect of Ca fertilizers on pod Ca concentration or yield. A strong cultivar effect was detected for both parameters measured. `Evergreen' (5.47 mg Ca per gram dry weight) had the highest pod Ca concentration and `Labrador' (4.10 mg Ca per gram dry weight) the lowest. No significant fertilizer × cultivar interactions were observed. Results for pod Ca concentration remained consistent, even when significant year effects were found for both parameters.