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  • Author or Editor: J. N. Corgan x
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Naringenin in peach buds was first reported by Hendershott and Walker (5) in 1959 and later by Dennis and Edgerton (2), Samish and Lavee (8), and Corgan (1). Naringenin is of interest because of its inhibition of wheat coleoptile elongation and possible effect on rest of peach buds.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘NuMex BR1’ is a Yellow Grano-type cultivar of short day onion (Allium cepa L.) resistant to premature seedstalk formation (bolting) and to pink root disease caused by Pyrenochaeta terrestris (Hans), Gorenz, Walker, and Larson. It was developed for fall planting where bolting is a serious problem. ‘NuMex BR1’ may be planted 10 days earlier than other Yellow Grano-type cultivars. The early planting facilitates stand establishment, and the large over-wintering plants sustain relatively low v/inter plants loss (4). On fields heavily infested with P. terrestris, the early planting results in increased yields. With large over-wintering plants and rapid plant development in the late winter and early spring, the early-planted onions attain large size before pink root becomes a serious problem. P. terrestris has a high temperature optimum (about 28°C) (2) and is relatively inactive in cold soils.

Open Access
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(2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) applied to onions (Allium cepa L. cv. Excel) at 5% seedstalk emergence at 2500, 5000, or 10,000 ppm reduced seedstalk height from 94 to 68, 62, and 54 cm, respectively. Lodging at seed harvest was reduced from 53% to 10%. The 2500 and 5000 ppm treatments had no effects on seed yield, but the 10,000 ppm treatment tended to lower it. Seed weight and seed germination were not affected by treatment.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘NuMex Sundial’ and ‘NuMex Suntop’ are bolting-resistant, intermediate-day onion (Allium cepa, L.) cultivars developed for fall planting in areas where seeded onions are overwintered. The cultivars were released in Sept. 1986 by the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘NuMex Sunlite’ is a bolting-resistant, pink root, [Pyrenochaeta terrestris, (Hansen) Gorenz, Walker and Larson] resistant, yellow grano-type onion (Allium cepa L.) developed for early fall planting. The release of ‘NuMex BR1’ as a bolting-resistant, yellow grano-type in 1981 had a significant impact on the New Mexico onion industry. Bolting resistance permits early planting and increases yield potential, and the greater plant development in cool season, resulting from early planting, helps control pink root losses, which are most severe in warm weather. More than one-half the New Mexico short-day crop in 1986 was ‘NuMex BR1’ ‘NuMex Sunlite’ resembles ‘NuMex BR1’ in bolting resistance, plant characteristics, and yield potential. ‘NuMex Sunlite’ has a higher level of pink root resistance than ‘NuMex BR1’ (Table 1), and is suggested for early fall planting on fields severely infested with P. terrestris.

Open Access

Abstract

A growth inhibitor isolated from dormant peach flower buds was identified as abscisic acid (ABA). Peach bud extracts were assayed for relative growth inhibition by the total acid fraction and for growth inhibition of a purified ABA fraction. Inhibition by both the total acid and ABA fractions increased in the fall until about the time of leaf abscission, and inhibition by both fractions decreased near or shortly after the end of the rest period. The inhibition by the total acid fraction decreased relatively more than the ABA fraction, possibly indicating interaction with growth promoting compounds in the total acid fraction. Inhibition increased as buds swelled, after termination of rest.

Open Access

Abstract

Gibberellic acid (GA), when applied to peaches from early August to early September at 200 ppm, resulted in flower thinning, bloom delay, and increased hardiness near bloom. Early August treatments were more effective than earlier or later applications. A morphological study of buds after treatment indicated that GA: delayed flower initiation, delayed development after initiation, resulted in smaller buds, and delayed microsporogenesis.

Open Access

Abstract

Late-winter application of 5000 ppm (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) to fall-seeded short- day onions (Allium cepa L.) retarded leaf growth and inhibited bolting. Bolting inhibition was significantly correlated with bulb diameter at time of treatment. Bolting inhibition was greatest when bulb diameter was 0.9 to 1.6 cm at time of treatment. Bulb diameter in late February or early March was an effective criterion for the effectiveness of ethephon treatment to reduce bolting. When ethephon treatments greatly reduced bolting, the number of harvestable bulbs and yields were increased, but when bolting percentage in control plots was low, ethephon reduced yield by decreasing average bulb weight at harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Fall and late-winter treatments of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) at 2500 or 5000 ppm reduced bolting of fall-planted, short-day cultivars of onion (Allium cepa L.). Ethephon inhibited plant growth and reduced bulb size. Ethephon reduced yields when bolting in control plots was low or when cool spring weather restricted growth. With warm spring weather and 18% bolting in control plots, ethephon reduced bolting to 3% with no effect on yield. Ethephon caused some winter plant loss in 1 of the 3 years. Loss was greatest when higher rates of ethephon were applied in the fall to very young plants.

Open Access
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Abstract

Thirteen different foliar sprays and 1 soil treatment of several chemicals were evaluated for their effects on tipburn of ‘Great Lakes 659’ head lettuce. Succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (5000 ppm), N-6 benzyladenine (25 ppm), simazine (2000 ppm), and 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (100 ppm) plus CaCl2 (2500 ppm) each reduced tipburn. Triiodobenzoic acid (50 ppm) and phenylmercuric acetate (100 ppm) each increased tipburn, while gibberellic acid (50 ppm) plus N-6 benzyladenine (25 ppm), CaCl2 (2500 ppm), urea (2500 ppm), calcium chelate (100 ppm), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 lb./acre) plus CaCl2 (100 lb./acre) soil treatment each had no significant effect on tipburn. Injury symptoms and reduced head weight were noted from simazine and phenylmercuric acetate treatments.

Open Access