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  • Author or Editor: J. L. Robertson x
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Abstract

Traditional methods of harvesting were compared to a once-over bud harvest of standard chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cv. May Shoesmith). Despite greater direct labor and material requirements, once-over bud harvesting resulted in net returns that were 11 to 17% greater than that for traditional flower harvesting. The economic feasibility of bud harvesting was more dependent on potential productivity increases rather than the additional labor and opening area requirements necessary for bud harvesting.

Open Access

Abstract

Gladioli were merchandised in various ways to measure the market acceptance of the gladiolus as a non-funeral flower. The gladiolus was found to have strong consumer acceptance in both arrangements and loose bunches. Consumer segments especially receptive to the gladiolus were males and persons less than 35 years old.

Open Access

Abstract

Survey analysis of the major North American rose producers provided a profile of industry marketing and postharvest management practices. The role of the wholesaler in product distribution has diminished, as more than half of the firms now utilize some form of retail distribution. Although most firms perceived little industry-wide uniformity in rose grading, packaging procedures were uniform, with most firms packaging roses in units of 25. The use of floral preservatives has been widely adopted, as nearly 80% of the firms used preservatives in their production operations, but postharvest storage practices have not been optimal, as nearly 45% of the firms stored roses at non-optimal temperatures levels. Most firms indicated that roses last between 5 and 6 days; however, 47% of the firms indicated that rose vase life should extent to 8 days or longer.

Open Access

Abstract

Color and bunch composition were the most important factors influencing the consumer's purchase decision of loose-bunch merchandising of fresh flowers. Roses had significantly more product appeal than carnations and Marguerite daisies. Price was judged relatively more important for the mixed loose bunches where consumers selected the loose bunch with roses at $5.95 over the loose bunch with 5 roses at $7.95. The addition of a yellow hybrid tea rose increased the marketability of a loose bunch almost as much as the addition of an orange and peach sweetheart and floribunda rose, respectively. For mixed loose bunches, $5.95 to $7.95 was the optimum price range. For the homogeneous bunches, $2.95 to $4.95 was the most popular price range.

Open Access

Abstract

A survey conducted among all wholesale producers of florist crops in Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and St. Louis revealed annual gross sales for 126 firms averaged $183,000 per firm. Retail florists comprised the principal customer type, followed by commission and merchant wholesalers. The number of firms selling entirely to terminal wholesale flower markets has declined appreciably in recent years with a trend toward expansion of sales to mass market outlets. A trend toward increased economic concentration among midwestern wholesale producers was evident Wholesale producers selling direct to retailers had an improved potential market position relative to wholesale producers selling primarily to terminal market wholesalers. Trade practices reflected these differences in market position.

Open Access

Abstract

A quantitative evaluation of interregional competition among foreign and domestic carnation producers in U.S. markets was completed using linear programming. Employing a revised transportation model, parameters included current carnation production costs, transportation rates, domestic consumption, domestic production, and foreign supplies. The sensitivity of the results to changes in parameters was examined through the application of alternative regional supply capabilities capabilities and tariff rates.

Results indicated that under current regional cost relationships, California and Colorado have a competitive advantage in most U.S. markets over producers in all other domestic and foreign production areas. While California and Colorado producers have expanded carnation production in recent years, they have not fully utilized their economic advantage in expanding rapidly enough to meet increases in domestic demand and competition from Latin America. Producers in all domestic production areas except California and Colorado were found to be at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production costs and greater seasonal fluctuations in carnation quality and quantity.

Open Access

Abstract

The demand structure for potted chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) was determined in a Columbus supermarket chain during an 8 week autumn period. Results indicated that the demand for 10 cm and 12½ cm potted chrysanthemums was elastic with respect to price when merchandised in a high consumer traffic retail outlet. Demand for potted chrysanthemums was found to be somewhat inelastic at Thanksgiving and more sensitive to price decreases than price increases. Fifteen cm potted chrysanthemums were found to be less sensitive to price and impulse purchasing.

Open Access

Abstract

A computer simulation was developed to analyze the economic feasibility of over-tree misting based on the interrelationships of daily temperature, bud development and corresponding effects of low temperature on apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) and peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) flower bud kill in Ohio. Utilizing historical temperature data from 1940 through 1972, a revised model for estimating rest and bud development was constructed and the probability and extent of bud kill was simulated. Model validity was tested utilizing 1973-1976 temperature data. Using the 1940 to 1976 period, it was evident that the risk of substantial losses in revenue was reduced when over-tree misting was employed in all Ohio locations. Potential economic returns of the over-tree misting technology were greater for peaches than apples. Need for this risk reduction varies geographically in Ohio for apples and to a lesser extent for peaches.

Open Access

Abstract

Conjoint analysis was used to evaluate the effect of form, composition, flower type, flower color, and price on the marketability of roses. Form was the most important floral product attribute influencing the consumers’ impulse rose purchasing. Mixed rose arrangements with carnations and pompon chrysanthemums were more marketable in an impulse purchasing environment than was the traditional all-rose package. Trade-off analysis of product form, composition and price indicated that as consumer impulse purchasing increased, the red Hybrid Tea rose lost its competitive position at the expense of non-red Floribunda and Sweetheart roses. Male and female subjects were shown to have differing priorities concerning desirable characteristics of the rose product. Price variation was relatively unimportant in the purchase selection of roses.

Open Access

Abstract

Marketability of arrangements of rose (Rosa hybrida L.) was evaluated on the basis of unit size, stem length, cultivar, flower condition including openness, bentneck and discoloration, and price using conjoint analysis. Long stemmed, 12 unit red hybrid tea roses lost competitive position in favor of shorter 9 and 5 unit rose arrangements. Price was the major determinant for the favorable consumer acceptance of the smaller sized, short stemmed roses in arrangements. The cultivar of rose marketed and the degree of flower openness were important factors influencing the consumer's purchase decision. Low priced short stemmed roses (40 cm) in a tight bud-stage were the most highly valued, however, ‘Sonia’ roses evoked strong consumer appeal regardless of price or stage of bud openness.

Open Access