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  • Author or Editor: J. K. Greig x
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Abstract

‘Kennebec’ and ‘Irish Cobbler’ potatoes were irrigated when 1/3 or 2/3 of available soil moisture was depleted in a 3-year study. Control plots were not irrigated. Soil temperatures at 4-inch depth were equal in irrigated and non-irrigated soils one year and 2° and 7°F (1.1° and 3.9°C) cooler in irrigated soils the other 2 seasons.

U.S. No. 1 yield of ‘Kennebec’ was greater with irrigation when 1/3 available moisture was depleted in a low rainfall and high temperature season. ‘Irish Cobbler’, the same season, produced greatest yield by irrigating when 2/3 available moisture was depleted. Number of U.S. No. 1 tubers differed between seasons and followed yield trends. Specific gravity and number and weight of tubers were all inversely related to air and soil temperatures. Air and soil temperatures apparently are the major factors affecting potato yield under Kansas growing conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

In 1976, pruning and transplanting at 11 weeks increased the number of early marketable fruit from all cultivars compared to 11-week, nonpruned plants and plants transplanted at 8 weeks, whether pruned or not. Eight-week, nonpruned plants produced larger fruits than 11-week plants in early season regardless of cultivar. Effect of transplant treatments on fruit-set varied with cultivar. The greatest fruit-set was on 8-week, nonpruned ‘Bell Boy’ transplants and the least on 8-week, nonpruned ‘Emerald Giant’ transplants. Eleven-week-old transplants generally set more fruit than 8-week transplants, regardless of cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

A Single foliar spray of 5-chloro,-2-thenyl, tri-n-butyl-phosphonium chloride (CTBP), 90% soluble powder; tetrahydrofur-furyl isothiocyanate (CHE 8570), 47% emulsifiable concentrate; 5-bromo,2-thenyl,tributyl-ammonium chloride (CHE 9064), 50% wettable powder; or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 14.2% emulsifiable concentrate, was applied when first flowers opened of ‘Salem’ and ‘Top Crop’ snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Treatments of CHE 9064 at 8.72 g/ha and TIBA at 2.32 g/ha significantly increased yield of spring-planted ‘Salem’ in 1971. Treatments of CHE 8570 and CHE 9064 at 11.62 g/ha significantly increased yields of spring-planted ‘Top Crop’ in 1972 due to increased pod set Foliage samples at harvest showed no physiologically significant increase in P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, or Zn for the treated plants compared with the controls.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Fall-planted spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Bloomsdale Long Standing), field grown 2 successive years in Plant Hardiness Zone (PHZ) 5 at Manhattan, Kansas, under 13 soil fertility treatments, withstood as low as −21°C and yielded satisfactorily a month earlier than when spring planted. There were no significant differences in yield due to soil fertility treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

Growth studies of field-seeded hybrid and open-pollinated asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) were conducted to determine the differences in shoot, bud, and crown growth during the first season after seeding and to determine growth relationships between shoot and crown variables that indicate critical periods of bud and crown production. F1 hybrid (UC 157) and UC800 open-pollinated (OP) asparagus seedlings emerged 4 to 6 weeks after seeding. A lag phase of shoot and root growth lasted 4 to 5 weeks after emergence in both cultivars. UC157 initiated more roots and accumulated more fern and crown fresh weight than UC800 early in the season, but by harvest crowns were not different in root and bud number, fresh weight, or fructose content (crown quality). Root/shoot ratios increased from a 2:1 ratio 6 weeks after emergence to 8:1 (UC157) and 6:1 (UC800) 23 weeks after emergence. Shoot/bud ratios stabilized from an approximate 2:1 ratio initially to an approximate 1:2 ratio 18 weeks after emergence. Bud production in the F1 and OP cultivars increased 6 and 10 weeks after emergence, respectively, and continued unabated up to crown harvest 23 weeks after emergence. Shoot number and fresh weight were not correlated highly with bud number. The number of roots vs. buds and the crown vs. fern fresh weights were correlated highly and were the best indicators of quality crown production. Vigorous fern development throughout the growing season increased the potential to produce higher-quality large crowns.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of soil applications of Zn as ZnSO4 at 2, 4, 6, and 8 ppm and as ZnNa2-EDTA (disodium zinc ethylenediamine tetraacetate dihydrate) at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 ppm on Allium cepa L. cv. Sweet Spanish dry matter and mineral composition were investigated in the greenhouse. Soil used was a sandy loam with pH 7.6, cation exchange capacity of 4.2 meq/100 g and available Zn of 0.63 ppm.

Total dry matter (TD) increased with Zn up to 6 ppm as ZnSO4 but decreased significantly at 8 ppm, indicating Zn toxicity 108 days after planting. TD, however, was less than the control at all levels of Zn as ZnNa2-EDTA tested, and 1.5 and 2.0 ppm killed plants 87 days after they were sowed; that also suggested serious Zn toxicity. Zinc concentrations in all plant parts sampled increased with Zn applications. Leaf Zn concentrations correlated significantly with bulb dry matter. For correlations with bulb dry matter, leaf tissue determined Zn status of bulb onion better than did pseudostem or leaf plus pseudostem. Zinc distribution was influenced by Zn source. For the ZnSO4 source, bulb Zn was higher than leaf Zn; the reverse was true for the ZnNa2-EDTA source, at both 69 and 108 days after sowing. Zinc as ZnNa2-EDTA significantly increased Na concentrations in bulbs. Zn at high rates depressed leaf tissue concentrations of Fe, Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg. NPK increased tissue content of Zn, P, Fe, Cu, Mn, Ca, Mg, and Na in the control plots in which NPK was supplied.

Open Access

Abstract

Seed of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) germinated normally after 2 months of constant freezing (-10°C) or chilling (4°) under water-saturated conditions in laboratory germination studies. However, temperatures cycling weekly from chilling to freezing for 2 months reduced germination to less than 50%, and temperatures cycling weekly from warm (21°/16°, day/night) to chilling to freezing for 2 months reduced germination to 0. The stands of asparagus, field-seeded in November and December, were reduced 85% by winterkill in comparison to spring seeding in March and April. Seeding densities from 10 to 40 seed/m did not compensate for stand loss. The greatest contributor to winterkill apparently was seed rot. March seeding increased plant height, but not crown quality or the number of shoots initiated in comparison to conventional April seeding. High seeding densities did not reduce plant growth or crown yields in the spring plantings. Stand establishment was not different between the spring planting dates. Early March seeding at high densities is recommended.

Open Access

Abstract

Mineral fertilizers increased yield and concn of N in leaf tissue more than organic fertilizers when nutrients were applied to make mineral and organic rates identical. All 3 types of fertilizer treatments increased N concn in plant tissues over the control plots. Organic fertilizer resulted in significantly higher P concn in plant tissue than did MF or MFSN for every crop. Mineral fertilizer increased Ca uptake the 1st and 3rd crops, but significantly reversed those results in the 2nd (overwintered) crop. Organic fertilizers increased Fe uptake significantly over MF the 2nd and 3rd crops and significantly increased Na uptake more than either MF or MFSN every crop. Of the 13 variables studied, concn of 10 variables was greater in the overwintered crop than in the spring planted crops.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Pod yields, nutrient content of plant tissues, and NO3-N accumulation in pods were determined for snap beans grown at 4 N and 2 P-K levels in the spring and fall seasons of 1968 and 1969. Increased N applications resulted in increased pod yields, higher levels of K, Ca, Mg, and Zn in the plants, and accumulation of NO3 in pods; however, the NO3 effects varied between years. Applied P-K reduced pod yield, increased Fe content of plants but antagonized Mg and Zn uptake. Of plant parts, pods accumulated the most N, P, and Zn; leaves, the most K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn; and stems, the most Cu. Seasonal influence of N and P-K application rate on yield was not consistent. In general, beans had higher nutrient content in the spring than in the fall. Translocation of K, Ca, Fe, and Cu was influenced by season.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Maximum yield was obtained from 120 lb. N/A; while, P and K had no favorable influence on yield. Fruit yield varied between years, probably because of rainfall variation.

Nitrogen and Cu levels of plants increased but P, Ca, and Zn levels decreased with N application. Applied P-K increased only P and K levels of the plants. Levels of N, Mg, and Cu were higher in 1969 than in 1968, but Fe showed a reverse trend. Nitrogen applications increased NO3 - accumulation in the fruit. Phosphorus and K concn were max in fruits; N, Zn, and Mn were high in leaves; and Ca and Mg concn were higher in green stems than in other tissues. Copper content was equally high in fruits and green stems. Roots contained max Fe, suggesting that okra plants tend to accumulate Fe in roots without translocating much to above-ground plant parts.

Open Access