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  • Author or Editor: J. C. Tu x
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Abstract

The effect of soil compaction on nodulation, nodule efficiency, and growth of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was investigated in a controlled environment. There was an inverse relationship between soil compaction and root biomass, shoot growth and total leaf area of plant. Fresh weight and number of nodules per plant, nitrogenase activity, and leghemoglobin content per unit weight of nodule decreased in both soybean and white bean as bulk density of soil increased from 1.2 to 1.6 g·cm–3.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

In the article “Soil Compaction Reduces Nodulation, Nodule Efficiency, and Growth of Soybean and White Bean”, by J.C. Tu and B.R. Buttery [HortScience 23(4):722–724, August 1988], the words “Modulation” and “Module” were used in the title instead of the correct “Nodulation” and “Nodule”. The title as noted here is correct.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Sanilac’ has been a popular white dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Ontario, Canada, as well as in Michigan, U.S.A. It is resistant to anthracnose incited by alpha, beta, and gamma races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magn.) Briosi & Cav. and race 1 of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) (1). ‘Sanilac’, however, is susceptible to race 15 of BCMV (2) and to races delta and lambda of C. lindemuthianum (5, 6, 7), and it was included in a backcrossing project to incorporate additional resistance genes. The new breeding line, designated Sanilac BC6-Are has broader resistances than ‘Sanilac’. Since several recently developed cultivars outyield ‘Sanilac’, Sanilac BC6-Are is being released only as germplasm.

Open Access