Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: J. B. Storey x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

Abstract

Ten day-old seedling pecans (Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch) grown in square plastic pots, speedling containers and styrene cylinders were treated with 1000 mg/liter 6-benzyIamino-purine (BA) and 5000 mg/liter gibberellic acid (GA3) singly and in combination. GA3 at 5000 mg/liter promoted stem diameter enlargement of seedlings grown in cylinders and pots but had no effect on stems of speedling-grown seedlings. BA and container design had no influence on stem diameter. “Air-pruning” of roots which occurred in speedling-grown seedlings produced a compact, fibrous root system. Stem diameter and height were not significantly reduced by root “air-pruning.” GA3 significantly reduced root dry weight of seedlings grown in cylinders.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Milam’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) has been released for public use to provide an alternative cultivar to ‘Loring’ especially in areas where ‘Loring’ is unadapted. Fruit of ‘Milam’ (Fig. 1) mature in about the same season at that of ‘Loring’ but ‘Milam’ is productive over a greater part of Texas than ‘Loring’.

Open Access

Pecan nuts from eleven different locations ranging from 1000 heat units at Chetopa, Kansas during the twelve weeks prior to shuck split to 1675 heat units in Zavala County, TX. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased and decreased respectively in `Mohawk' in 1991 and 1992 as the temperature increased during the kernel development period Fatty acids in `Pawnee' responded the same as in `Mohawk' in 1992 but were variable in 1991. Limited data showed a reversal of mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids in `Osage' in response to kernel development temperature. Higher temperatures caused the testas of `Cheyenne' to be darker in 1991 and 1992. Total oil content of `Mohawk' increased heat units. However, higher temperatures decreased oil content in `Pawnee'. Clinical evaluation of pecans is needed to confirm Grundy's safflower work.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Heading-back of about 50% of the previous season’ shoot growth increased leaflet area, internode length and total N of the leaflets. Heading-back did not affect P, K, Zn content of the leaflets or nut yield and quality. SADH increased Zn content of the leaflets, with no effect on N, P, and K. Internode length was reduced with increases in concn of SADH and leaflet area was not affected. Yield and quality were not affected the year of application, but 4,000 ppm significantly increased the yield the next year, an off-production year.

Open Access

Abstract

Chilling requirements for 3 pecan cultivars are reported for the first time. Stem cuttings with 4 buds of ‘Desirable’, ‘Mahan’, and ‘Stuart’ pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch) were forced in a greenhouse after each 100 hours of field chilling below 7.2°C during the 1969-70, 1970-71 and 1971-72 dormant seasons and bud break measured 21 days later. A chilling requirement of 500 hours was determined for ‘Desirable’ and ‘Mahan’, and 600 hours for Stuart.

Open Access

Abstract

Adaxial and abaxial leaflet surfaces of juvenile and adult pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch] leaves were characterized in relation to leaf age. Three types of trichomes were found. Nonglandular hairs (acicular and fasciculate) were the most common trichome type on juvenile-phase leaves and reached their greatest density on the abaxial surface of immature leaves. Peltate scales were present in two forms: vesicular scales and concave scales. The two were distinguished on the basis of size and shape. Both types were more common on the abaxial than the adaxial surface. The vesicular scales were more common on immature than mature leaves, whereas the occurrence of concave scales were unaffected by leaf age. Capitate glands were observed on the veins of immature leaves in both juvenile and adult phase. Laminai stomata of two sizes and unusual veinal stomata were observed, the latter being confined to the abaxial surface of immature leaves.

Open Access

Abstract

Zinc solutions applied by aircraft did not increase the zinc concentration in leaflets of pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch] above the deficiency level. Solutions applied by a hydraulic sprayer increased leaflet zinc concentration above that resulting from aerial application. Zinc concentration of pecan leaflets was not enhanced by addition of a surfactant or chelate but was enhanced by the use of zinc-urea-surfactant solutions. Data indicate that aerial foliar applications of solutions do not usually increase leaflet zinc concentration to the minimum level of 60 ppm required for normal growth.

Open Access

Abstract

Nitrogen zinc nitrate solution was applied to 18 species of container-grown woody ornamentals to determine if Zn levels could be increased and related to increased growth and plant quality. In 13 species there was an increase in Zn concentration as compared to untreated plants. Quality was improved in 3 species without a related increase in Zn content. Fe and Mn concentrations were unaffected in most species and no phytotoxicity was observed.

Open Access

Growth and B uptake of five pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] seedling cultivars were evaluated in two greenhouse experiments. Seedlings were exposed for 7 to 8 months to various B-containing irrigation solutions. In one study, the growth of `Apache', `Riverside', and `Burkett' seedlings declined significantly with a 5.0-mg B/liter application that provided 12.3 mg B/liter in the soil saturation extract. In the second study, B application of 2.5 mg·1iter-1 (6.4 mg·liter-1 in the saturation extract) reduced growth of `Western' and Wichita' seedlings. Seedling sources differed in susceptibility to B applications. `Apache' and `Wichita' seedlings were the more sensitive cultivars in the experiments. Leaf B concentrations increased linearly with concentrations in the saturation extract (r = 0.96 to 0.99), but did not depend on the cultivar. Boron toxicity (leaf interveinal chlorosis and tip necrosis) occurred within several weeks following B application of 1.25 to 2.5 mg·liter-1 (2.8 to 6.6 mg·liter-1 in the saturation extract, depending on cultivar). Three months later, chlorotic areas became necrotic in leaves containing >900 mg B/kg dry weight. Severe necrosis and some defoliation occurred when B concentrations were increased further. Leaves with no injury contained ≤325 mg B/kg.

Free access