Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: J. B. Gartner x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

R. B. Malek and J. B. Gartner

Abstract

Hardwood bark as a soil amendment for container-grown plants suppressed several species of parasitic nematodes in greenhouse tests. Volumetric bark to soil ratios of 4:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2 greatly reduced incidence of root-knot caused by Meloidogyne hapla Chitwood and M. incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). A 2:1 bark to soil mixture inhibited galling by M. incognita and population development of Pratylenchus penetrans (Cobb) Filipjev and Schuurmans Stekhoven and Trichodorus christiei Allen on Forsythia intermedia Zabel.

Open access

J. E. Klett and J. B. Gartner

Abstract

Total N content in the shoots of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat ‘Bright Golden Anne’ grown in hardwood bark was significantly greater when utilizing (NH4)2SO4 source of N than with KNO3 source. The NH4 + concn in the shoots was greatest at the low pH range when (NH4)2SO4 was the source of N. The NH4 + concn in the media was greatest at the low pH range when utilizing the (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 sources of N.

The greatest dry wt of shoots was obtained if test plants were treated with both NH4 + and NO3 forms of N with NH4NO3 source of N at the higher pH range and without the nitrification inhibitor.

Open access

J. E. Klett, J. B. Gartner, and T. D. Hughes

Abstract

Hardwood bark was used in combination with other materials as media for forsythia and juniper plants in containers with various growing procedures, bark sources, and fertility practices. Based on dry wt, the most rapid growth of forsythia was obtained in a bark and fine sand medium; whereas, the least growth was obtained in soil, peat, and perlite. However, pfitzer juniper plants under 2 different fertility regimes grew most rapidly in a bark, soil, and peat medium, slowest in a bark and torpedo #2 sand medium, and at an intermediate growth rate in soil, peat, and perlite. The standard mix (soil, peat, and perlite) was more acidic than the experimental mixes containing bark and sand. Chlorotic plants were more numerous in acidic mixes. Leaf tissue analyses from the plants grown in the peat amended bark and standard mix had higher Fe and Mn concn than plants grown in a bark-sand mix.

Open access

M. M. Meyer Jr., S. W. Binnie, and J. B. Gartner

Abstract

Dormant plants of Forsythia intermedia, Rosa hybrida, Rosa multiflora and Cornus alba siberica were treated with 2,6 dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil) (0 – 500 ppm) and abscisic acid (ABA) (0 – 250 ppm) to prolong dormancy in storage and increase growth after storage. These treatments were carried out in a common nursery storage and controlled temperature rooms. A factorial treatment arrangement with temperatures 1°, 10°, 21°C and each chemical was completed. Dichlobenil inhibited growth during and after storage. ABA did not affect shoot growth during or after storage. The lower temperatures inhibited growth during storage and resulted in better shoot growth after storage. There was no significant interaction of temperatures and the dormancy prolonging material on growth after storage.

Open access

A. R. Mazur, T. D. Hughes, and J. B. Gartner

Abstract

Physical properties of various hardwood bark-soil mixes for containers were compared to a soil-peat-perlite mix. Bark-soil mixes containing a wide range of bark particle sizes were found to possess superior physical properties initially and remained satisfactory after a 13-month incubation period. However, bark-soil mixes were much less stable and deteriorated to a significantly greater extent. For golf greens, physical properties of hardwood bark or peat and soil and sand mixes were studied following compaction at 40 cm moisture tension. Initially, the bark mixes were superior and this was postulated to be due to a more uniform distribution of bark within the mixes. Based on the deterioration that occurred in bark-soil mixes for containers, it is concluded that use of hardwood bark in golf green mixes does not appear feasible.