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  • Author or Editor: J. A. Rigney x
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Abstract

I approach the subject of “Education for Foreign Students” with considerable misgivings, partially because this topic has been under discussion by groups like this for the past 15 years. The very process of re-examining programs that are appropriate for foreign students implies that we have had some second thoughts about what the professional goals of these students are or should be. Alternatively, perhaps this re-examination results from a feeling that our original views on student goals were accurate but that we adopted poor strategies in achieving such goals. In either case we leave ourselves open to the charge of being presumptious in imputing a set of goals to other people on the basis of our prejudices. If the experience of the past 15 years of technical assistance has taught us anything, it is that we simply cannot successfully impose our own judgement on what other people should do with their own lives and resources. Therefore, it is my hope that some of my colleagues on this panel will be able to shed more light on what the foreign students themselves really feel about the quality of the graduate programs they have encountered in the United States apart from the superficial frustrations they experienced. Let me leave this side of the question to them with only one caveat, namely: the opportunity to study in the United States is by far the most highly prized form of technical assistance in the eyes of the developing nations, and this opportunity will likely have a more lasting effect than anything else we have done.

Open Access

Abstract

Respiration and ethylene production were determined daily on fruit of A. atemoya Hort. stored at 20°C from preclimacteric to postclimacteric stages. At 5 stages, fruit were analyzed for water, sugars, starch, organic acids, Vitamin C, thiamin, titratable acidity, pH, and total soluble solids. The major changes during ripening were a continuous decrease in starch, a continuous increase in fructose and glucose, an increase in sucrose to a maximum at the climacteric, an increase in malic acid early in the climacteric rise, and a decrease in Vitamin C after the climacteric. Eating quality was optimal 2 days after the climacteric and the levels of protein, fat, dietary fiber, ash, sodium, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, riboflavin, niacin, α-carotene, β-carotene, cryptoxanathin, energy content, and edible portion were determined at this stage. Fruit were stored at temperatures from 0° to 25°. The safe range of storage temperature was between 15° and 25° with 20° being the optimum for the development of eating quality but with 15° giving the longest delay in ripening. Storage at lower temperatures gave rise to symptoms typical of chilling injury.

Open Access