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  • Author or Editor: J. A. King x
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Abstract

‘Puget Gold’ is a partially self-fruitful apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) that has been more prolific and reliable in bearing than other cultivars tested at Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center, Mount Vernon. Since planting in 1979, it has produced a moderate to heavy crop every year, compared to ‘Skaha’ which did not crop at all in two seasons and set only a few fruits in most years. Because weather conditions at bloom time in early spring can inhibit pollination activity by insects, resulting in poor fruit set, the climate of the cool, moist Puget Sound region is not well suited to apricot production. Moisture-borne fungus diseases also can destroy blossoms and maturing fruit. Seven years' evaluation have shown ‘Puget Gold’ trees to be much better adapted to these adverse conditions than existing cultivars. ‘Puget Gold’ can fill a useful place in home orchards and gardens of western Washington, or other cool maritime climates.

Open Access

Ammonium and NO3 uptake from hydroponic solutions containing 1 mm each of (NH4)2SO4 and Ca(NO3)2 were measured during development of Dendranthema ×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura `Iridon', `Sequoia', and `Sequest'. Nitrogen depletion from solutions approximated a 1 NH4: 1 NO3 ratio throughout a 90-day growth cycle (r = 0.96). Although harvest date cultivar interactions were significant for both forms of N, overall patterns of N uptake were similar among cultivars. Nitrogen removal from hydroponic solutions (milligrams per plant) was greatest from days 40 to 60; however, N removal (milligrams per gram of tissue dry weight) was greatest in the first month of development and decreased steadily until day 90. From day 40 to 60, new leaf development ceased while inflorescence buds developed to ≈1.0 cm in diameter. After this time, N uptake decreased rapidly as inflorescences expanded. Correlations between morphological changes and N demand could maximize the efficiency of applied N by matching form and application timing with plant needs.

Free access

Abstract

Researchers working with strawberries often find it necessary to size, grade, count, and weigh the fruit (1, 2, 3, 4). These tasks present problems when the research involves a large number of test plots. Size-yield classifications of hand-sorted fruit are not only time-consuming, but are subject to human error. A strawberry sorter for research use was developed to reduce these problems.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliar applications at 3, 6, and 9 kg ai/ha of 10 plant growth inhibitors were evaluated on 2- to 3-year-old seedlings of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) under greenhouse conditions. Effective retardation or inhibition without terminal injury was obtained on silver maple with the high rates of ancymidol and MH and the low rate of fluoridamid. Ancymidol at 6 and 9 kg ai/ha, Krenite at 9 kg ai/ha and the combination, chlorflurenol + maleic hydrazide (MH) at 3 and 6 kg ai/ha, gave the best control of stem elongation on green ash without excessive injury.

Open Access

Seventy-one amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), 93 sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), and 14 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to extend an initial genetic linkage map for watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai]. The initial map was based on 151 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and 30 and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. A testcross population previously used for mapping of RAPD and ISSR markers was used in this study: {plant accession Griffin 14113 [C. lanatus var. citroide (L.H. Bailey) Mansf.] × the watermelon cultivar New Hampshire Midget (C. lanatus var. lanatus)} × PI 386015 [C. colocynthis (L.) Schrad.]. The linkage map contains 360 DNA markers distributed on 19 linkage groups, and covers a genetic distance of 1976 cM with an average distance of 5.8 cM between two markers. A genomic DNA clone representing 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC-) synthase gene, involved in ethylene biosynthesis, was also mapped. As in previous mapping studies for watermelon, a large number of AFLP and SRAP markers were skewed away from the 1:1 segregation ratio, and had to be excluded from the final mapping analysis. The stringent mapping criteria (JoinMap 3.0 mapping program) produced linkage groups with marker order consistent with those reported in previous mapping study for watermelon.

Free access

Genetic linkage map is being constructed for watermelon based on a testcross population and an F2 population. About 51.0% and 31.8% of the markers in the testcross and F2 populations are skewed form the expected segregation ratios. AFLP markers appeared to be clustered on linkage regions, while ISSR and RAPD markers are randomly dispersed on the genome. AFLP markers also have greater genetic distances as compared with ISSR and RAPD markers, resulting in significant increase of map distance. An initial genetic map (based on the testcross population) that contains 27 ISSR and 141 RAPD markers has a total linkage distance of 1,166.2 cM. The addition of 2 ISSR, 8 RAPD and 77 AFLP markers increased the genetic distance of the map to 2,509.9 cM. Similar results with AFLP markers were also shown in mapping experiments with an F2S7 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population that was recently constructed for watermelon. Although the skewed segregation, marker order appeared to be consistent in linkage groups of the testcross and the F2 population. Experiments with SSR, and EST markers are being conducted to saturate the linkage map of watermelon genome.

Free access

A genetic linkage map was constructed for watermelon based on a testcross population and an F2 population. The testcross map includes 312 markers (RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, SSR, and ASRP). This map covered a genetic distance of 1385 cM, and identified 11 large (50.7-155.2 cm), five intermediate (37.5-46.2 cm), and 16 small linkage groups (4.2-31.4 cm). Most AFLP markers are clustered in two linkage regions, while all other markers are randomly dispersed throughout the genome. Many of the markers in this study were skewed from the classical (Mendelian) segregation ratio of 1:1 in the testcross or 3:1 in the F2 population. The order of the markers within linkage groups was similar in the testcross and F2 populations. Additionally, a cDNA library was constructed using RNA isolated from watermelon flesh 1 week (rapid cell division stage), 2 weeks (cell growth and storage deposition stage), 4 weeks (maturation stage), and 5 weeks (mature fruit) after pollination. More than 1020 cDNA clones were sequenced, and analyzed using the basic local alignment search Tool (BLAST). The sequenced cDNA clones were designated as expressed sequenced tag (EST). The ESTs were searched for simple sequence repeats. About 7% of the ESTs contained SSR motifs. The ESTs containing SSRs are being used to design PCR primers and the putative markers are being tested for polymorphism among the parental lines of the mapping populations. Polymorphic markers will then be mapped using the mapping populations.

Free access

Two-year-old, field-grown golden kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) and fuzzy kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) plants were evaluated for injury following an early freeze event of −4.1 °C on 14 Nov. 2018 in Burleson County, TX. Plant material included seven cultivars: one seed-propagated [Sungold™ (ZESY002)] and three cutting-propagated golden kiwifruit (AU Golden Dragon, AU Golden Sunshine, CK03), and one seed-propagated (Hayward) and two cutting-propagated fuzzy kiwifruit (AU Authur and AU Fitzgerald). Observations were made 5 weeks after the frost event. Base trunk diameter (BD) and maximum trunk diameter damaged (MDD) provided a reference of plant size and crude measurement of damage intensity, as evident by presence of water-soaked necrotic and/or dehydrated tissue following the removal of a thin slice of periderm, vascular cambium, phloem, and xylem. Percent of base diameter damaged (PBDD) was calculated as MDD divided by BD and provided an assessment of damage, unbiased by plant size. Percent of shoot damaged (PSD) was visually evaluated as the percentage of entire shoot system exhibiting damage. In addition, presence of basal damage (DB) and basal cracking (CB) were recorded. A strong cultivar response was observed for BD, MDD, PBDD, and PSD. Mean cultivar values for PSD ranged from 79% and 19% for AU Authur and Sungold™ seedlings, respectively, which represented extremes among cultivars. Fuzzy kiwifruit exhibited greater injury (PBDD, PSD, DB, and CB) as compared with golden kiwifruit cultivars. Basal damage and basal cracking proved unique to fuzzy kiwifruit, as DB ranged from 0% in Sungold™ seedlings to 100% in fuzzy kiwifruit ‘AU Authur’ and ‘AU Fitzgerald’. In spite of having greater vigor, golden kiwifruit plants sustained less injury. Method of propagation had no effect on injury. PBDD and PSD proved to be reliable field assays for documenting injury, based on their strong correlation value (r = 0.92). Greater relative autumn frost tolerance of golden kiwifruit over fuzzy kiwifruit cultivars is previously unreported.

Open Access

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) is dedicated to farming systems that are environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable. Established in 1994 at the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (NCDACS) Cherry Farm near Goldsboro, N.C.; CEFS operations extend over a land area of about 800 ha (2000 acres) [400 ha (1000 acres) cleared]. This unique center is a partnership among North Carolina State University (NCSU), North Carolina Agriculture and Technical State University (NCATSU), NCDACS, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), other state and federal agencies, farmers and citizens. Long-term approaches that integrate the broad range of factors involved in agricultural systems are the focus of the Farming Systems Research Unit. The goal is to provide the empirical framework to address landscape-scale issues that impact long-run sustainability of North Carolina's agriculture. To this end, data collection and analyses include soil parameters (biological, chemical, physical), pests and predators (weeds, insects and disease), crop factors (growth, yield, and quality), economic factors, and energy issues. Five systems are being compared: a successional ecosystem, a plantation forestry-woodlot, an integrated crop-animal production system, an organic production system, and a cash-grain [best management practice (BMP)] cropping system. An interdisciplinary team of scientistsfrom the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NCSU and NCATSU, along with individuals from the NCDACS, NGO representatives, and farmers are collaborating in this endeavor. Experimental design and protocol are discussed, in addition to challenges and opportunities in designing and implementing long-term farming systems trials.

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