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  • Author or Editor: Ilana Kobiler x
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Abstract

Seal-packaging of individual fruits of ‘Shamouti’ and ‘Valencia’ oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), grapefruit (C. paradisi Macf cv. Marsh) and lemons (C. limon Burm. f. cv. Eureka) with a film of high-density polyethylene (0.01 mm) markedly delayed their deterioration as measured by peel shrinkage, softening, deformation and loss of flavor. This film was applied to fruit that had received conventional treatments of disinfection with sodium orthophenylphenate and waxing. Sealed fruit maintained their fresh appearance more than twice as long as conventionally handled fruit. Weight loss of fruit was reduced about five-fold. Sealed fruit at 20° were firmer and lost less weight than non-sealed fruit at the lowest optimal temperature. Sealing various citrus fruits in high density polyethylene reduced both their respiratory activity and ethylene production. CO2 and O2 content in the internal atmosphere of the sealed and control fruit were similar but ethylene content was lower in the sealed fruit.

Open Access

Abstract

Seal packaging of orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cvs. Valencia and Shamouti], grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Marsh) and lemons (Citrus limon Burnt, f. cv. Eureka) with high-density polyethylene (HOPE) film (0.01 mm in thickness) delayed softening and inhibited weight loss and deformation of the fruit more than cooling. Sealed fruit at 20°C and 85% relative humidity (RH) had better appearance and were firmer than non-sealed fruit at their lowest temperature possible without chilling injury and 85–90% RH. HOPE seal-packaging also inhibited chilling injury of grapefruit and lemons stored at 5° and 2°C, respectively. The C02 content of grapefruit was unaffected by seal-packaging, hut it was lower at cooler temperatures. Decay of citrus fruit depended more on the storage temperature than on the type of packaging. However, in storage up to 1 month, no significant difference was found in most experiments in decay percentage between orange, grapefruit, and lemon sealed with HOPE and stored in a packing house (13 to 25°C), and non-sealed fruits, at the lowest temperatures possible without chilling injury of 2, 10 and 14°C, respectively.

Open Access

Abstract

Conventional degreening of fruits of lemon [Citrus limon (L.) Burm f.] by ethylene gas or treating with the ethylene-releasing agents (2-chloroethyl) phosphonic acid (ethephon) or 2-chloroethyl-tris(2-methoxyethoxy)silane, aggravates the development of various blemishes resulting, at times, in a loss of more than half of the fruit. Seal-packaging of lemons in 10 μm-thick film of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) markedly inhibited the development of blemishes. After 3 weeks’ storage, fruit commercially degreened with ethylene was 19.8 % blemished when unpackaged and 6.3% blemished when sealed in HDPE. Furthermore, this treatment delayed deterioration of fruit for a period longer than 6 months, much beyond that required for marketing. Spoilage resulting from blemishes, decay, softening, or overripe-coloration was much lower in sealed than in the non-sealed fruit. The combination of treatment with ethylene-releasing agents and HDPE seal-packaging permits degreening of lemons.

Open Access