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Hugh A. Daubeny

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Hugh A. Daubeny

The indigenous North American red raspberry, Rubis strigosus has been neglected in breeding programs. Only four cultivars, `Cuthbert', `Latham', `Herbert' and `Ranere' provide most of the germplasm contained in present-day cultivars; no more than six individual wild genotypes of the species are represented by the four cultivars. In recent years, the B.C. breeding program has screened seedling populations of hitherto unexploited genotypes of the species from various locations in North America. Useful traits identified in selections from the populations include levels of resistance to 1) the North American aphid vector, Amphorophora agathonica, of the raspberry mosaic virus complex, 2) to several cane diseases and 3) to root rot caused by Phytophthora fragariae var rubi, as well as desirable fruit traits, such as bright, non-darkening red color and easy release. Selections with cultivar potential have now been identified in the second and third backcross generations from the species.

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Hugh A. Daubeny and Chaim Kempler

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Hugh A. Daubeny and Angela Anderson

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Hugh A. Daubeny and Chaim Kempler

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Chaim Kempler and Hugh A. Daubeny

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Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Lisa Frey and Tom Walters

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Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Brian Harding and C. Grant Kowalenko

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Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Brian Harding and Chad E. Finn

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Dominique Michaud, Thierry C. Vrain and Hugh A. Daubeny

Transformation of plant genomes with cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) genes represents an attractive option for the biological control of insect pests. However, this strategy must be carefully considered, because the transgenic plant endogenous proteinases may represent potential target enzymes for the exogenous inhibitors produced. For example, we are considering the transformation of strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) with cystatin cDNA clones, to control the Coleoptera pest black vine weevil (BVW; Otiorynchus sulcatus). Electrophoretic analyses of adult BVW proteinases have revealed the involvement of at least five proteinase forms for protein digestion, and the major form was strongly inhibited by oryzacystatins (OCI and OCII), two cystatins isolated from rice seeds. A similar analysis of proteinases showed the existence of OC-sensitive proteinase activity in the leaves of strawberry, suggesting a possible risk of interference of the inhibitors in the transformed plants. In addition, the two rice inhibitors were rapidly hydrolyzed at 25C when incubated with proteinase extracts from either young, mature or senescent leaves. An efficient control of BVW by plant cystatin-expressing transgenic strawberry plants is therefore potentially possible, but the correct targeting of the inhibitors in the plant cells using appropriate signal peptides could be necessary.