Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Howard J. Brooks x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Under the auspices of the Agreement Between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Exchanges in the Scientific, Technical, Educational, Cultural, and Other Fields in 1966-67, I collected wild fruits in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in the summer of 1967. I travelled with Dr. Willis Skrdla, Research Agronomist, U.S. Regional Plant Introduction Station, Ames, Iowa, who collected seed of legume and forage crops. We arrived in Moscow August 15 and departed October 1.

Open Access

Abstract

Administrators of State and Federal horticultural research programs have a legal responsibility to serve both taxpayers and horticultural industries. Our horticultural industries have a moral responsibility to help provide for their own research needs. I think these responsibilities are well understood. But what are the responsibilities, implied or otherwise, in the administration of funds provided by industry to support public research programs? These responsibilities are not clearly defined and the administration of industry funds may be a source of misunderstanding between research institutions and horticultural industries they serve. I will discuss this subject, delicate as it is, with the hope that opportunities for better understanding and better administration of industry funds can be identified.

Open Access

Abstract

A questionnaire on genetics and breeding of horticultural crops, in conjunction with our responsibilities to the National Plant Genetics Resources Board (an advisory board to the Secretary of Agriculture under authority of Secretary’s Memorandum 1875 Revised dated 23 Feb. 1978), was sent to appropriate department chairmen or program leaders in Land Grant Universities, 1890 institutions, and the USD A Agricultural Research Service (ARS). The purpose of the questionnaire was to survey past, present, and anticipated programs on breeding and genetics of horticultural crops and to solicit views on national needs for germplasm of horticultural crops. Responses on the status of programs were received from all 98 questionnaires, and 74 respondents made comments on national needs.

Open Access

Abstract

The tremendous success of the fruit and nut breeding programs in this country has been largely due to the accessibility of a wide range of germplasm. Much of this germplasm was brought in from other countries since most fruit and nut crops are not indigenous to the U.S. Each breeder made his own arrangements and provided for his own program needs. There has been no national plan for coordinating the introduction, evaluation, maintenance, and preservation of this germplasm which requires distinctly different propagation methods than those used for seed crops. This paper describes a plan to establish a national fruit and nut germplasm repository system.

Open Access