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Harvey E. Arjona and Frank B. Matta

Greenhouse-grown purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) were harvested mature-green 55 or 60 days after anthesis (DAA) and stored for 10 days at 10C. After storage, half the fruit were treated with 10 μl ethylene/liter for 35 hours and then stored at 21C for 48 hours. Juice of treated and nontreated fruit was analyzed for comparison with juice of vine-ripened fruit (harvested 70 to 80 DAA). Sucrose concentration decreased and fructose and glucose concentrations increased after storage, regardless of ethylene treatment. Fruit harvested 55 or 60 DAA, with or without ethylene, had the same sugar and soluble solids concentrations and pH as vine-ripened fruit. Ethylene treatment enhanced surface purple pigmentation of fruit harvested mature-green.

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Harvey E. Arjona and Frank B. Matta

Passion fruit has become a popular addition to our diet and is currently grown in the United States. Passion fruit shelf life could be extended if green mature fruit can be induced to ripen after exposure to ethylene. Greenhouse grown purple passion fruits were harvested in a green mature stage 55 and 60 days after anthesis (DAA) and stored for 10 days at 10°C. After storage half of the fruits were treated with 10 ppm ethylene for 35 hours and stored at room temperature (21°C) for 48 hours. The juice of treated and non-treated fruit was analyzed for comparison with juice of vine-ripened fruit. Total soluble solids and pH of the juice did not differ in green mature fruits harvested 55 and 60 DAA.. compared to vine-ripened fruits (70-80 DAA). Sucrose content decreased and fructose and glucose increased after storage, regardless of ethylene treatment. Fruits harvested 55 and 60 DAA, with or without ethylene and stored for 10 days, developed the same sugar content, soluble solids and pH as those that ripened on the vine.

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Harvey E. Arjona, Frank B. Matta, and James O. Garner Jr.

Fruit growth (diameter) of purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims.) and maypop (P. incarnata L.) followed a sigmoidal growth curve. Passion fruit were larger than either greenhouse-grown or wild maypop fruit. Wild maypop produced larger fruit than greenhouse-grown maypop. Yellow passion fruit had the lowest percentage of pulp and the highest soluble solids concentration (SSC) and greenhouse-grown maypop had the lowest SSC among the four groups tested. Purple and yellow passion fruit had lower juice pH than maypop. Wild maypop fruit had the highest sucrose content and purple passion fruit had the lowest. Yellow and purple passion fruit juice had higher fructose and glucose contents than did maypop juice.

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Harvey E. Arjona, Frank B. Matta, and James O. Garner Jr.

Vine-ripened yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg.) packed and shipped from Homestead, Fla., were stored for 15, 30, or 45 days at 5, 10, or 15C. Fruit analyzed immediately on arrival had the best external appearance and highest fruit weight. Fruit weight loss increased with storage time at all temperatures and the response was linear. Fruit external appearance deteriorated rapidly at 5 and 15C. Pulp percentage at 5C increased linearly with storage duration and did not change at 10C. Pulp percentage at 15C changed quadratically with storage time, increasing up to 30 days and then decreasing by 45 days. Soluble solids concentration did not change at 5 or 10C, but decreased linearly at 15C. Sucrose content decreased quadratically at 5C, linearly at 15C, but increased linearly at 10C. Fructose and glucose content decreased quadratically with storage time at 15C. Glucose content increased linearly at 5 and 10C and fructose content did not change at these temperatures.

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Harvey E. Arjona, Frank B. Matta, and James O. Garner Jr.

Fruit growth and composition of commercial passion fruit types and maypop were compared. Fruit growth (diameter) of purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims.) and maypop (P. incarnata L.) followed a sigmoidal growth curve. Passion fruit were larger than both greenhouse-grown and wild maypop fruit. Wild maypop produced larger fruit compared to greenhouse grown maypop. Yellow passion fruit had the lowest percentage pulp and the highest soluble solids. Greenhouse-grown maypop had the lowest soluble solids. Purple and yellow passion fruit had lower juice pH than maypop. Wild maypop fruit had the highest sucrose and purple passion fruit had the lowest. Yellow and purple passion fruit juice had higher fructose and glucose than did maypop juice.

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Harvey E. Arjona, Frank B. Matta, and James O. Garner Jr.

Physico-chemical characteristics of purple and yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims.) were compared with those of maypop (Passiflora incarnata L.). Fruit diameter of maypop and purple passion fruit followed a typical sigmoidal growth curve. There were no differences in growth rate between the two species during the exponential phase. Growth differences, occurred after the exponential phase (10 and 20 days after anthesis). Fruits of the commercial types were heavier than greenhouse and wild grown maypop. Wild grown maypop produced heavier fruit compared to greenhouse grown maypop. Commercial passion fruit produced heavier rinds and greater pulp weight. Yellow passion fruit had the lowest percentage pulp and the most soluble solids. Greenhouse grown maypop had the lowest soluble solids. No differences in juice pH were found between the two species. Wild maypop fruits had the highest sucrose and greenhouse grown purple passion fruit had the lowest. Yellow and purple passion fruit had higher fructose than maypop. Glucose was significantly different between the two species, but not within species.

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Harvey E. Arjona, Frank B. Matta, and James O. Garner Jr.

Vine-ripened yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg.) were placed in styrofoam trays and wrapped with VF-60 plastic film and stored for 15 and 30 days. Wrapping prevented fruit weight loss while maintaining external appearance. Storage time contributed to quality loss of external appearance. Wrapping maintained fruit glucose and fructose content at 43 and 40 mg·ml-1 up to 15 days, respectively, and did not influence juice pH. Initial sucrose content of wrapped fruit declined 62% after 15 days in storage. Plastic film did not effectively modify O2 or CO2.