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  • Author or Editor: H. N. Sox x
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Abstract

Fruits of several cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cultivars were analyzed for sugar and dry matter content shortly after harvest and after a 3-day storage period (16°C). The storage period produced no consistent pattern of differences in reducing and total sugar and dry matter content Large fruits (3.81–5.08 cm diameter) had more sugar than small fruits (<2.70 cm diameter). Fructose, glucose and sucrose were shown to be present Storage had little quantitative effect on sugar concentration. Additional data from other seasons confirmed that nearly all of the sugar present was reducing sugar. Correlations between refractive index and reducing sugar were from .42 to .93 in one experiment and from .05 to .84 in another. The sugar concentration was higher in locule tissue than in the carpel wall tissue. The sugar concentration of the fruit was generally less than 3% and refractive index expressed as percent soluble solids does not appear to be an accurate indicator of sugar content.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruit extracts of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Tiny Tim were found to contains α- and β-galactosidase, a- and β-glucosidase, α- and β-mannosidase, and α- and β-xylosidase activities. All of these enzymes either declined or remained constant in concentration during fruit development and ripening. Activities of β-glucosidase and α-galactosidase were found to be associated with isolated cell wall fragments. No evidence was found for an increase in concentration of the enzymes in the cell wall during ripening. The probability that these enzymes are not involved in fruit softening is discussed.

Open Access

Abstract

Leaves of Cucumis sativus L. contained predominantly, non-reducing sugars which included verbascose, stachyose, raffinose and sucrose. Glucose and fructose were also present. The major sugars of fruit were glucose, fructose, and sucrose. Stachyose was present in small fruit (5 to 7 g fresh weight), but no soluble galactose-containing saccharides were found in larger fruit. Other plant parts also contained the raffinose saccharides. The identities of these sugars were established by partial enzymatic hydrolysis and paper chromatographic examination of the hydrolytic products. Four species of lactic acid bacteria from cucumber fermentations were able to ferment stachyose, raffinose, sucrose, melibiose, galactose, glucose, and fructose.

Open Access