Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: H. C. Mohr x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

Abstract

The development of short-internode cantaloupes has been of interest for a number of years because of the obvious advantages of potentially larger plant populations and, more recently, mechanical harvest. In those areas where furrow irrigation is practiced, the savings in labor requirement to keep vines trained up on the beds is also a factor.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Tomato seedlings of a selection from the plant introduction PI 244956 and the cultivar, ‘Floralou’, were grown for 5 weeks following cotyledon expansion under 2 different temperatures regimes, i.e., 42 to 56°F, and 68 to 80° and subsequently grown in the greenhouse at 68 to 80°. Plants of the PI selection grown at the 42 to 56° range as seedling bore more deformed fruits on the first and second clusters than those grown at 68 to 80°. The PI plants produced more deformed fruits in both temperature regimes than did ‘Floralou’ plants. Most fruits from ‘Floralou’ plants appeared normal regardless of seedling temperature. Flower buds from the first and second clusters of both warm and cold-treated plants were studied histologically. Buds with abnormal ovary development exhibited breakdown of tissue at the stylar base. Ovaries of such buds developed into abnormal fruits that were not marketable.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Two varieties of tall bearded iris, ‘Color Carnival’ and ‘First Violet’, were grown at minimum temperatures above 20° F throughout the fall and winter months. Groups of these plants were transferred periodically to a 65° house where they received either long or short-day treatments. Plants of ‘Color Carnival’ flowered under long days, regardless of the length of the vernalization period; under short days, some flowering occurred if the plants received more than 8 weeks of vernalization. Plants receiving 16 or more weeks of vernalization flowered equally well under long days or short days. Plants of ‘First Violet’ did not flower under flowering did not occur until the plants had long days unless the plants had received 16 or more weeks of vernalization; under short days received 20 or more weeks of vernalization. The longer the plants had been held at the minimum temperature, the shorter the time required for flowering after being transferred to 65°.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

When 2 mutant dwarf watermelons were crossed, the F1 was of normal vine type, indicating that these genes for dwarfness were non-allelic. The F2 segregated 9:3:3:1, with the double recessive a plant form hitherto unreported. The designated genotype of this digenic recessive dwarf is dw 1 dw 1 dw 2 dw 2. It has much shorter internodes than either parent, the crown branching characteristic of 1 parent and the naked bud characteristic of the other, and it was later in maturity than either parent.

Breeding lines derived from double recessive plants show promise of horticultural value as cultivars for the home garden and intensive commercial culture with the possibility of a mechanized harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Dwarfness in ‘K70’ a dwarf cultivar of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), is due to internodes that are shorter than those of the tall, indeterminate ‘Stono’. Both plant types had the same no. of internodes after 15 weeks growth. Associated with short internodes is a greater no. of smaller cells per unit area of leaf tissue. The darker green appearance of ‘K70’ leaves is due to greater no. of cells, not difference in chlorophyll content.

Open Access

Abstract

The rhizomes of 3 cultivars of tall bearded irises (Iris spp.)—‘Cayenne Capers’, ‘Babbling Brook’, and ‘Stepping Out’—were stored at 2°C for 9, 14, and 18 weeks and then forced to anthesis in a greenhouse. During vernalization, rhizomes were either planted into pots or placed on cooler shelves. Rhizomes of ‘Cayenne Capers’ required no vernalization to develop the flower bud, yet vernalization was required for ‘Babbling Brook’ and ‘Stepping Out’. The longer the vernalization period, the shorter the time to flower after being removed to the forcing environment. Rhizomes not planted during vernalization required more time to flower than those which were planted.

Open Access