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  • Author or Editor: H. C. De Roo x
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Abstract

Raw mycelial sludge produced by the pharmaceutical industry, containing 34% gypsum on a dry weight basis injured and suppressed early growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Rutgers) when incorporated into a loamy sand at the rate of 27 or 242 ton (wet weight)/ha. Equivalent amounts of gypsum, 3 or 27 ton/ha added to soil in a greenhouse experiment produced no ill-effects indicating that the gypsum per se, contained in these fermentation wastes, was not responsible for injury and suppressed growth of tomato.

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Abstract

The water economy of plants often is seriously unbalanced by root destruction or vascular occlusion induced by various rot organisms. Water absorption by the roots and water transport within the plants is impeded and wilting follows. Beckman (1) reviewed the literature on the histological and physiological changes in host plants infected with pathological wilts. Dimond and Edgington (2), studying the mechanics of water transport in healthy and Fusarium-vrilted tomato plants, pointed out the tremendous pressure deficits that are required to maintain normal water flow into leaves through partially plugged vessels.

Open Access