Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: H. B. Tukey Jr. x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

Abstract

The founding and early administration of the American Society for Horticultural Science was led by those concerned primarily with pomology and to a lesser extent vegetable crops, and these two areas of horticulture dominated Society meetings for half a century. Reports of research with ornamental crops, including both floriculture and nursery plants, did not appear on programs or in the Proceedings for many years, despite the interest of L. H. Bailey, first president of the Society. Bailey mentioned the virtues of floriculture and landscape gardening in his first presidential address (1) and later the “growing taste for ornamental planting” in America (2). Speakers at early meetings summarized research on nursery crops in Europe (16), the benefits of plant exploration in China, and the need for a coordinated effort in establishing a system of plant introduction (2), but it was not until 1913 that Blake's report (3) on roses appeared, the first paper about a floricultural crop. Woody plants were first discussed in 1925-26 (11, 17, 25); but it was not until 1930, 27 years after the founding of the Society, that papers related to nursery plants appeared with any frequency. Thus, the early history in ASHS of growth and development of woody landscape plants is sparse, although at the same time bulletins were being published at several experiment stations and scientists in Europe were publishing regularly.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

Urban Horticulture is a new area of scientific horticulture concerned with functional uses of plants to maintain and improve urban environments. “Functional uses” means that plants are used not only for beauty and ornamentation, but also as screens against wind, headlights, and unpleasant views, to influence climate, perhaps to reduce noise and combat forms of air pollution, for essential food and variation in human diet, and to improve the human psyche in densely populated areas. The constituent audiences for urban horticulture are people who utilize plants, primarily in landscape situations, including landscape maintenance and parks personnel, landscape architects, arborists, highway planters, nursery contractors, members of plant societies, and amateur horticulturists.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

We often use the noun “ornamentals” to describe plants used in landscapes, around homes and other buildings, in parks and public gardens, and along streets and highways. However, “ornamentals” can be perceived quite differently by others outside our profession and with serious consequences.

Open Access

Abstract

Onset of rest, anthocyanin development, and leaf senescence and abscission were delayed in Euonymus alatus Sieb. ‘Compactus’ grown under intermittent mist. Leaf and bud tissues of misted plants contained less extractable abscisic acid (ABA) than did leaves and buds of non-misted plants. Mist leached endogenous and applied ABA from Euonymus leaves. Application of synthetic racemic ABA to growing Euonymus plants hastened onset of rest and increased anthocyanin development. This suggests that the observed responses of Euonymus to intermittent mist may be due to leaching of endogenous ABA.

Open Access

Abstract

Abscisic acid (ABA) content of Euonymus alatus leaves increased in response to increasing moisture stress. In excised leaves, ABA content rose rapidly following loss of 7-10% of the initial fresh weight In intact plants, the ABA increase was triggered at a xylem pressure potential of −10 to −12 bars. Non-misted Euonymus plants contained significantly greater amounts of ABA than misted plants; however, xylem pressure potentials of the misted and non-misted plants did not differ. Thus, leaching of ABA, rather than reduced moisture stress, is apparently the cause of decreased ABA content of misted Euonymus, as previously proposed.

Open Access

Abstract

Root growth and nutrient absorption by dormant plants were studied in root temperature chambers placed in growth rooms so that root and shoot temperatures could be controlled. The roots of dormant Ligustrum ibolium and Euonymus alatus ‘Compactus’ grew at root temperatures of 12.8°C, but were limited at 7.2° and 1.7°. Uptake and translocation of 32P to the dormant shoots were influenced somewhat by root temperature. However, increasing the shoot temperature from 1.7° to 7.2° resulted in a considerable increase in the movement of the isotope to the dormant shoots of both species. Field experiments indicated that nutrients applied in the fall could be absorbed by the plants, contributing to the dormant reserves which could enhance growth the following spring.

Open Access

Abstract

Chrysanthemum morifolium, Ram. cuttings were rooted in special containers so that the stems and foliage were exposed to intermittent nutrient mist at the same time that the basal ends of the stems and developing roots were irrigated with 32P-labeled nutrient solution. Analyses of the radioactive and non-radioactive P contents of the cuttings revealed that almost all of the P absorbed by the cuttings during propagation was absorbed by the stems and foliage from the nutrient mist and either utilized in new growth of the foliage or translocated into the developing roots. Absorption of P from the rooting medium was of importance only during the last 2 days of propagation when new roots were well developed, and even then, was less than foliar absorption. Applications of nutrients to herbaceous and softwood cuttings are made more efficiently through nutrient mist than to the rooting medium directly.

Open Access

Abstract

A foliar application of 5 × 10−5 M phenylmercuric acetate plus a wetting agent reduced water loss by transpiration from chrysanthemum plants by more than 30% for a period of 4 days following treatment without causing tissue damage or inhibiting growth and flowering. This reduction of transpiration was associated with a reduction of stomatal pore size. However, treatment concentration was critical, as foliar damage and reduction in growth occurred at high concentrations of PMA.

Open Access

Abstract

Rooted cuttings of Pilea cadierei Gagnep. & Guillaum., Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cv. Giant #4 Indianapolis White, Hedera helix L. cv. Thorndale, Pachysandra terminalis Siebold & Zucc. and young plants of Juniperus chinensis L. cv. Mint Julep and Ligustrum X vicaryi were exposed for 3 weeks to either water mist or mist to which a complete all soluble fertilizer (23N-8P-14K) was added; roots and root medium were protected from the mist. The N, P and usually K content of all plants increased after foliar application of nutrients. Pilea, pachysandra and Hedera increased in height, dry weight, and number of lateral breaks; privet increased in height and overall greening of the foliage occurred. The optimum concentration of foliar-applied nutrients was 600 ppm for Pilea, 750 ppm for Hedera and pachysandra and 300 ppm for Ligustrum; higher concentrations caused foliage injury. Injury occurred to chrysanthemum and juniper at all concentrations studied. Cuticle thickness and plant tolerance to foliar nutrition were not correlated.

Open Access

Abstract

Solution pH differentially affected the foliar absorption of phosphorus compounds by Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat cv. Giant #4 Indianapolis White. All phosphates were absorbed readily at pH 2, which was accompanied by necrosis of the treated area of the leaf. Maximum absorption occurred with Na phosphate at pH 3-6, K phosphate at pH 7-10, and NH4 phosphate at all pH values (3-10), whereas Ca phosphate was not readily absorbed. The results could be explained by pH dictating the phosphate form present in solution; solubility, moisture retention, and crystallization on the leaf surface of the predominant phosphate salt were the factors determining the degree of absorption.

Open Access