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  • Author or Editor: GyeSoon Jeong x
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Trichoderma has been known to control soil-borne pathogens and to enhance plant growth and development. The objective of the study was to evaluate dispersal of Trichoderma via irrigation water in container production. 3.81 × 30 cm PVC pipes were filled with Sunshine Mix #5 up to 25 cm. Ten tomato seeds, boiled and coated with T. harzianum, were placed at 0.5 cm depth in each pipe. All treatments were irrigated carefully with 100 ml of DD water from top every 2 days. Before and one hour after irrigation the potting mix was sampled from 5 depths at 5.5 cm intervals every 2 days for 8 days to determine Trichoderma density. Trichoderma density was significantly higher in after irrigation. Trichoderma dispersed up to 25 cm deep in container potting mix after 4 days via irrigation water. This study successfully demonstrates that Trichoderma can be rapidly dispersed via irrigation water.

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Trichoderm a spp. are currently being investigated for biological control of soil-borne pathogens and their potential to enhance plant growth and development. The influence of T. harzianum and T. hamatum on growth of 7 bedding plant species was Investigated. Trichoderm a formulated in peat moss and wheat bran, was mixed into germination and growing media at 1 × 106 cfu per gram of medium. Seeds were germinated in plugs and later grown in cellpacks containing a treated and non-treated medium until market stage. Plants were evaluated by measuring height, fresh and dry weight, and number and timing of flowering. Growth enhancement was found in marigold (14.8% dw), petunia (15.5% dw) and tomato (38.2% dw), however, no significant differences were seen in celosia, impatiens, salvi a and vinca. Results suggest that growth enhancement by Trichoderm a is species dependent and that Trichoderm a applied in the plug mix remains-effective through marketing stage.

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Toxicity symptom of micronutrients copper, magnesium and zinc were investigated for geranium, marigold, vinca and zinnia. Plants were grown in peat-lite mix in 11 cm plastic pots and watered with nutrient solutions containing 0.05, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 mM concentrations of Cu2+, Mg2+ and Zn2+. In most species, the concentrations of these micronutrients higher than 5 mM greatly reduced plant growth and induced stem and foliar toxicity symptoms. Toxic levels of Cu2+ and Zn2+ reduced plant and leaf sizes without producing leaf spots in all species tested. Toxicity symptom of Mn2+ were characterized by numerous chlorotic or brown leaf spots. Visual leaf toxicity symptoms of these 3 micronutrients in each species are illustrated.

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