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Glenn R. Wehtje, Charles H. Gilliam and Ben F. Hajek

Adsorption of 14C-labeled oxadiazon was evaluated in three soilless media and a mineral soil at concentrations between 0.1 and 100 mg·kg-1. Adsorption, which was at least 96%, was not influenced by absorbent type (medium vs. soil) or by oxadiazon concentration. However, desorption was greater in the media than in the soil. After five water extractions, 5.4% of the applied oxadiazon was recovered from media, but only 0.4% was recovered from the soil. In the soil and in two of the media, leaching with water failed to displace oxadiazon 2 cm below the surface to which it had been applied. No oxadiazon was detected below 4 cm in the third medium. Oxadiazon is sufficiently adsorbed to resist leaching-based displacement. Oxadiazon is not likely to enter the environment by escaping from treated containers. Chemical name used: 3-[2,4-dichloro-5-(1-methylethoxy)phenyl]-5-(1,1-di-methylethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-(3H)-one (oxadiazon).

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Glenn R. Wehtje, Charles H. Gilliam and Ben F. Hajek

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Glenn R. Wehtje, Joey N. Shaw, Robert H. Walker and Walker Williams

Various inorganic soil amendments have been promoted as a means of improving the chemical and physical properties of certain soils. To test this hypothesis, a marginally productive soil was supplemented with 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% (v/v) of either selected inorganic amendments or sand. Amendments consisted of commercially available diatomaceous earth, calcined clay, zeolite, and crystalline SiO2. The soil material was extracted from the argillic horizon of a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludults). Ability of these soil-amendment mixtures to promote `Tifway' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt Davy] growth was evaluated under greenhouse conditions, and contrasted to that obtained in nonamended soil. Selected chemical and physical properties that are pertinent to plant growth were also evaluated. The experiment, which was conducted 3×, began with a §60-day period in which both water and nutrients were optimum. This was followed by a 30-day drought. During optimum water and nutrients, no soil-amendment treatment(s) consistently resulted in superior bermudagrass growth compared to soil alone. However, <2% of the bermudagrass tissue that was produced during the drought became green and succulent with the resumption of irrigation in nonamended soil. This percentage was exceeded by all treatments that contained either ≥60% diatomaceous earth (Axis), or ≥40% calcined clay (Profile); and by 100% zeolite (Clinolite) and 100% silica (Green's Choice). Drought-sustaining ability of soil-amendment mixtures was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with water-holding ability, soil strength, bulk density, and oxygen diffusion rate, but not correlated with either pH or cation exchange capacity (CEC). While certain inorganic amendments did improve the drought-sustaining ability of soil, the amount required was generally ≥40%.

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Wheeler G. Foshee III, Collin W. Adcock, Glenn R. Wehtje, Charles H. Gilliam and Larry W. Wells

Effects of combining labeled rates of halosulfuron (Sandea) and s-metolachlor (Dual Magnum) were evaluated as a preemergence (PRE) application in a randomized complete block designed experiment at the Wiregrass Experiment Station in southeastern Alabama. Treatments were assigned in a factorial arrangement of four levels of halosulfuron (0.0, 0.009, 0.018, and 0.036 lbs. a.i./acre) and six levels of s-metolachlor (0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 lbs. a.i/acre). The purpose of the study was to ascertain possible synergistic effects from combining these two herbicides to control nutsedge at a possible lower cost. Two repetitions were completed in 2005 with data pooled in analysis. Results found no interaction between the halosulfuron and the s-metolachlor and therefore no synergistic affects. Analysis of the main effects revealed that the highest labeled rate of either herbicide gave the highest percent control relative to the nontreated control. Soil activity of halosulfuron in controlling nutsedge has been shown to be less effective than foliar applications. Our own LD90 greenhouse studies confirmed this to be true. We examined four application techniques of halosulfuron (POST both soil and foliar, POST foliar only, POST soil only, and PRE soil only) to determine the LD90. Results revealed that halosulfuron had the lowest LD90 from the treatments with a foliar application. However, some soil activity was observed. Results from field studies indicated that PRE applications of halosulfuron must be at the highest labeled rate to provide effective control. S-metolachlor was equal to halosulfuron on percent control and is lower in cost on a per acre basis.

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John W. Wilcut, Charles H. Gilliam, Glenn R. Wehtje, T. Vint Hicks and Diane L. Berchielli

Preplant-incorporated, preemergence, and postemergence herbicides were evaluated for yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) control and for phytotoxicity to four container-grown woody plants. Preplant-incorporated or preemergence applications of chlorimuron at 0.07 kg a.i./ha or imazaquin at 1.12 kg a.i./ha provided the greatest control of yellow nutsedge. Imazaquin applied at 0.28, 0.56, 0.84, or 1.12 kg a.i./ha suppressed growth of Rhododendron × `Copperman' azalea and Lagerstroemia indica ×sfauriai `Natchez'. All other herbicides tested were safe on the four woody plants evaluated. Chlorimuron provided the best combination of yellow nutsedge control and tolerance on woody ornamental. Chemical names used: 2-[[[[(4-chloro-6-methoxy-2-pyrimidinyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoic acid (chlorimuron); 2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (imazaquin).

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Paul C. Bartley III, Glenn R. Wehtje, Anna-Marie Murphy, Wheeler G. Foshee III and Charles H. Gilliam

Two commonly used management practices for weed control in container plant production are hand pulling and herbicide applications. There are problems associated with these methods including crop phytotoxicity and environmental concerns associated with off-target movement of herbicides. Other nonchemical weed control methods could reduce herbicide-based environmental concerns, mitigate herbicide-resistance development, and improve the overall level of weed control in container nursery production. Readily available tree-mulch species, eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), ground whole loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) were harvested, chipped, and evaluated at multiple depths with and without the herbicide dimethenamid-p. Pine bark mini-nuggets were also evaluated. Mulches were applied at depths of 1, 2, and 4 inches and evaluated over three 30-day periods for their effectiveness in suppressing spotted spurge (Chamaesyce maculata), long-stalked phyllanthus (Phyllanthus tenellus), and eclipta (Eclipta prostrata). After 30 days, herbicide/mulch combinations, as well as mulch treatments alone, had reduced weed fresh weight 82% to 100% with 1 inch of mulch. By 168 days after treatment, dimethenamid-p had lost all efficacy, and mulch depth was the only factor that still had significant effects, reducing spotted spurge fresh weight by 90%, 99.5%, and 100% with depths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, respectively. The economics of mulch weed control will depend on variables such as available time, nursery layout, location, and availability of resources, equipment, among others. Regardless of variable economic parameters, data from this study reveals that any of these potential mulch species applied at a depth of at least 2 inches will provide long-term weed control in nursery container production.

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Timothy L. Grey, Glenn R. Wehtje, Ben F. Hajek, Charles H. Gilliam, Gary J. Keever and Patrick Pace

Adsorption, mobility, and filtration ability of organic media toward metolachlor were evaluated in a series of laboratory experiments. Experimental variables included media type, metolachlor concentration, and equilibration time. Adsorption isotherms were determined by applying the log form of the Freundlich equation. Mobility was evaluated using glass columns filled with media, which were then surface spiked with metolachlor and then leached daily for 10 consecutive days. Peat, pine bark, combinations of these two media and a mixture of pine bark and sand adsorbed >90% of the 14C metolachlor. Freundlich sorption coefficients were 10.9, 18.2, 13.4, 14.2, and 11.0 for pine bark, peat, 5 pine bark: 1 peat, 3 pine bark: 1 peat, and 5 pine bark: 1 sand, respectively. In a timed exposure experiment using bark, minimum metolachlor adsorption (57%) was at 90 seconds and maximum adsorption (82%) required at least 1440 minutes. In column leaching studies, data for all media indicate that metolachlor is relatively immobile through these substrates. An initial pulse of metolachlor (<1.0 μg·liter-1) was detected with each medium up to the third wetting event with a subsequent decline (>0.5 μg·liter-1 for each medium) in the metolachlor recovered. Filtration efficiency of commercially formulated metolachlor from water passed through different lengths of pine bark filled filters was 0%, 17%, 20%, 22%, 23%, and 29% for filters 4, 20, 12, 8, 16, and 24 cm in length, respectively. These results support the contention that such filtration would be effective provided the residence time of water within the filter was sufficient for adsorption of the contaminant by the media to occur.